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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i love the idea of a nagant revolver as a survival pistol: it fires many different cartriges and you can get the 32 acp conversion cylinder. not to mention how sturdy and rugged it is. does anyone have input on the matter? thanks.
 

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i love the idea of a nagant revolver as a survival pistol: it fires many different cartriges and you can get the 32 acp conversion cylinder. not to mention how sturdy and rugged it is. does anyone have input on the matter? thanks.
No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
 

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No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
you got served dawg!
 

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The M1895 revolver was used extensively by the Russian Imperial Army and later by the Soviet Union after the Russian Revolution. In Russian service, it was known for its extreme sturdiness and ability to withstand abuse. As one former Imperial Russian officer stated, "if anything went wrong with the M1895, you could fix it with a hammer".

It was widely employed by the Bolshevik secret police, the Cheka, as well as its Soviet successor agencies, the OGPU and NKVD. In the police role, it was frequently seen with a cut-down barrel to aid in concealment by plainclothes agents. Despite the advent of the more modern Soviet TT pistol, the M1895 remained in production and use throughout World War II.

The Nagant's sealed firing system meant that the Nagant revolver, unlike most other revolvers, could make effective use of a sound suppressor, and suppressors were sometimes fitted to it.[2] During World War II, a small number of Nagant revolvers used by Russian reconnaissance and scout troops were outfitted with a variety of sound suppressor known as the "Bramit device". Silenced M1895 Nagant revolvers, modified in clandestine workshops, also turned up in the hands of Viet Cong guerrillas during the Vietnam War as assassination weapons. There is an example of a silenced Nagant M1895 in the CIA Museum in Langley, Virginia, USA.

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGdD5Ox...8/**http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagant_M1895
 

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No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
Pistols don't win or loose wars for any army. Especially the Russian armies because a sidearm in all Russian armies was issued to officers/kommissars only. In general, the effectiveness of a sidearm on the battelfield is negligible at best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
it fires 7.62x38r, .32 s&w long, .32 magnum, and .32 s&w short. and the conversion cylinder allows .32 acp. thats 5 different rounds. so your "one specific cartrige" hypothesis just got shot to 5#!+. :thumb:
 

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No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
That's funny, because my Nagant revolver fires ANY .32 handgun cartrige except ACP.
The Nagant revolver can shoot .32 "short" .32 long, and most importantly, .32 H&R magnum. Mine shoots .32 H&R mag almost exclusively. I haven't tried it with the new .327 Fed Mag. That one may be too high pressure. The Nagant revolver is quite versatile, and actually shoots very well with ammo other than 7.62 Nagant.
 

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I like the Nagant revolver for what it is, but I find it difficult to decide that it would be my only defence. A back up, sure, or even a car gun, but it really is a weapon for plinking and generally a fun gun. I would add that it may be just the ticket on the trap line.
 

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Gentlemen your rim diameter is very close and allows you to put the .32 into the nagant but:

The American .32s have a case diameter .020 smaller than the nagant chamber. (which is why the .32 acp falls into the chanber)

And a bullet diameter .022 larger than the nagant bore.

That is not cartridge interchangability!
 

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Mousepad1123
I used a .32 S&W Long for a few years on the trapline. I used shorts for killing animals in the traps(less damage) and Lo ngs for the occasional fox or coyote (or other game) that I saw while out there. A .38 is to big and a .22 seemed to small for some of the shots.
When Ruger brought out the SSM in .32 Mag I got one and still used shorts for kill shots.
I had a friend who trapped and he did a lot of muskrat and beaver trapping, with them you usually make drowning sets (I think it is illegal now to even have a bullet hole in the hide of these species), but he also went after bobcat and coyotes.
One day he got in a situation where he had to drop his boots, pistol belt and anything else to keep from drowning, he got his stuff mostly back including the pistol and belt but only after hours of mucking about. He could have lost the gun in the situation and it seems to me that it would be better to lose a $100 Nagant if nessecary than a $400 S&W.
 

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Gentlemen your rim diameter is very close and allows you to put the .32 into the nagant but:

The American .32s have a case diameter .020 smaller than the nagant chamber. (which is why the .32 acp falls into the chanber)

And a bullet diameter .022 larger than the nagant bore.

That is not cartridge interchangability!
But they chamber and fire just fine. Accurate, too. Sure, the brass bulges a little bit, but the cases still eject just fine. Many, many people shoot .32 H&R mag through the Nagant revolver. It is "interchangeable enough" I guess!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
But they chamber and fire just fine. Accurate, too. Sure, the brass bulges a little bit, but the cases still eject just fine. Many, many people shoot .32 H&R mag through the Nagant revolver. It is "interchangeable enough" I guess!
i'd have to agree with you about safely interchanging calibers in the nagant. although i have never used the mags that you use, plenty of .32 longs have gont through my 1940 specimen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Great piece of history, but wouldn't be my 1st choice for a survival pistol.
i read somewhere that it is STILL USED by some remote police forces in russia (note: these places probably still don't know that russia is no longer communist and that the cold war is over) and some railroad guards. that may have been a wiki source so take it with a grain of salt. although i have no problem that it is still used.
 

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.... The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian. ....
Nagant was a Belgian.

That said, the brass makes up out of .223 hulls, and the fact it can be used with no gas escape at the barrel gap makes it practical for various very neat things to be done at the muzzle.

This is very long. However, I have done it, and it works.

spcwingo; said:
I have found a way to create cheap reliable brass that actually achieves the gas seal! I was just poking around on the net and found this:

Suggested tools and materials:

.223 brass and corresponding shell holder
.30 Carbine reloading dies - mine is an RCBS
reloading press ("O" type, heavy duty type not required; I have also done this
on my Lyman Spar-T)
disk sander (not necessary but it does help to speed things along)
case lube (suggest Motor Honey)
knock-out rod (details in text)
mallet (mine is rawhide)
blank shell holder or metal disc about shell holder diameter
case trimmer with .30 caliber pilot

1. Shorten .223 brass. After trying a number of ways, I found that the
easiest way, and very fast, was to use my disc sander. It takes about 3
seconds per case using a no. 60 grit. No, the disk does not fill up with
brass. Push the case into the sander disk, removing material to about half
way between the neck and the shoulder. This may seem a little short to you,
but the case lengthens considerably as it is swaged.

2. Using a case inside-outside deburrer, remove the burrs. This is done so
that the case mouth may be opened without crushing, using an expander button,
or preferably, a Lyman "M" die.

3. Remove primer decapping pin assembly from the .30 Carbine full length
sizing die. Important! Set the die so that it touches the ram firmly
when the ram is raised.

4. Lube the case liberally (I use Motor Honey) and run it into the .30
Carbine die about 1/3 of the way. Do not force it beyond where it feels
good and tight. Doing so is to assure that a stuck case will result.
Take it from one who learned (several times) the hard way. Back case out
of die.

5. Re-lube case and ram to about 2/3 the way home. Same warning as in 4,
above. Back case out of die.

6. Re-lube case. This time you can run it all the way home. It will back
out pretty easily. Notice that at this point, the swaging process has been
accomplished just past the web of the case -- that's good.

7. Re-lube. Using a blank shell holder, set the sizing die so that it
presses firmly, but not hard, against the shell holder when the ram is
raised fully. The spring of the press, when the case is rammed all the
way home, will assure that the case rim is not swaged. This can also be
done by laying a metal slug, like a slug from a knock-out hole in an
electrical box, on top of any regular shell holder. The blank shell
holder is just a little more convenient.

8. Ram the case all the way home. Use a knock-out rod to remove the
case. Two things are important here.

First is that the knock-out rod should be as large in diameter as
possible. This will depend on the particular sizing die used. My RCBS
die has a 1/4x28 thd decapping rod. It will accommodate a .210" rod
which I made from a very long bolt that originally had 1/4x20 threads
rolled onto its end; one of those rods used to hold cable reels together.
To assure that it will not bend when struck with a mallet, the rod should
be only as long as is necessary to drive out the case. Mine is 3 1/2"
long. The rod head is handy to act as a retainer so that it does not
fall out of the die, but is not necessary. Note that it is not difficult
to drive out the fully swaged case when done as prescribed here, and the
rod need not be hardened as long as it is not too long. Mine is as soft
as any steel gets.

Second, when driving out the case, do not try to emulate Paul Bunyan.
Tapping the rod (I use a rawhide mallet) 3-4 times will remove the case
without bulging out the head. One mighty whack risks messing up the head
spacing, and more important, makes it difficult to get into the .223
shell holder. Out of about 80 cases that I have made so far, only a
couple have given me resistance. They were fixed by chucking into my
drill press and using a quick swipe of a half round file. If there is a
slight rounding of the head, it will not adversely effect the outcome.
This is a good time to wipe the lube off of the cases. Also, decapping
can done any time one chooses. I use a universal decapping die for this
task.

9. Chuck case into your trimmer and set to reduce the case length to 1.51".
Notice that the brass has lengthened significantly as it steps through the
swaging process. If it has been shortened as directed in step 1, only a few
turns of the trimmer handle will be needed.

10. You might want to try chambering your cases now to make sure that
they will fit. My die reduces the very base of this tapered case to
.360-.362". This is as perfect a fit as one can get in my revolver. I
do not know if these guns vary much in chamber diameters.

11. Next use either the provided .30 Carbine RCBS expander die or,
preferably, the Lyman "M" die to prepare the case mouth to receive the
bullet. If you expand prior to chambering for the first time, depending
on how much you bell the mouth, you may be alarmed to discover that the
case will not chamber. This is because of the relatively steep taper of
the case which will not stand for much belling and still chamber. Don't
worry, the loaded cartridge will have this bell removed by the crimp.

It is possible that the case mouth will benefit from annealing to keep it
from splitting but I chose to skip this process until I see need for it.
I have annealed the original brass because of the radical crimp applied
to the factory rounds.

At this point, your brass is ready to load.....
I tried this method and it is kinda slow, but works perfectly!
 

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I use 7.62x38r ($$$), but mostly lots of .32 S&W Long:D:

I do not use .32 H&R Magnum to keep the pressure down.

I would not use it as a shtf pistol unless thats all I had. I like the history and it's a neat fun pistol. I like the way it feels in my hand.
 

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No it dosen't, it fires one specific cartridge that is very difficult to obtain and would be nonexistant in a crisis situation.

By the time you add the cost of the conversion cylinder you could have bought a real gun.

As far as sturdy and rugged, it is one of the most complicated revolvers ever designed. The only reason the Russians adopted it was that it was the only design submitted by a Russian.

Keep in mind that the Russians lost every war they fought while equipped with this pistol as the standard.
No sir you are wrong it was designed and built for some time be for hand by a Belgium designer named Nagant and all so it was used all the way though world war two by the Russian Army and then replaced completely by the tt-33 and as a side note the NVA used them to defeat the French and some where found being used when the US was in engaged in Vietnam :upsidedown:
 

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Also, the Nagant Revolver became so popular in Russia, so well known, that "Nagan" became synonomous for any type of revolver. Kinda like how any facial tissue is a "Kleenex" to us. It was held in very high regard, and still is in use by railroad security in Russia.
 

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Nagant is one of the finer field pistols of the world. Cases can be easily made up from .223 brass, and, just a sec, I said easily, and I should have said, for those of you who are not into wildcatting, practically. If you are interested in the how-to, PM me and we'll work out a way to get you the details.
 
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