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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ordered a 7'X7'X10' poly tunnel for this year's garden. Also got 5 25 gallon grow bags and 5 15 gallon grow bags to plant in. Growing starts from seed in the house and planted two strawberry towers that will eventually go into the new greenhouse. I plan to use reclaimed pallet wood for benches and secure the tunnel to the benches upon which the grow bags will sit. Hopefully the winds we routinely get, and the frequent foraging critters do not destroy the greenhouse before we can harvest. Has anyone else experimented with an inexpensive poly tunnel greenhouse?

 

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Good luck. One question. If that pic is your greenhouse and that is your climate, why bother with a greenhouse? Typically greenhouses are used to start plants before spring arrives or to grow crops and vegetables during colder seasons. Even little tunnels like yours get quite warm in the summer and any plants you keep in it will need to be watered heavily as they will get no rain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good luck. One question. If that pic is your greenhouse and that is your climate, why bother with a greenhouse? Typically greenhouses are used to start plants before spring arrives or to grow crops and vegetables during colder seasons. Even little tunnels like yours get quite warm in the summer and any plants you keep in it will need to be watered heavily as they will get no rain.
Don't have it yet, another few days for delivery. I'll take some pics. 43rd parallel here with oceanic influence (or a 45 degree heat sink two blocks away)..I have the grow bags, will run to the local nursery for a yard of garden soil, as all I have is sand. I've thought about a rain catchment system, but that will have to come later when I have time to drive into the valley where there is a tractor supply.
 

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You know how there will be a few frosts at the end of the growing year, followed by pretty good weather?

THAT is when that sort of greenhouse will shine. After a long hot summer the ground will hold a lot of heat, which will prevent what is inside the greenhouse from freezing. I also cover any plants in there for extra protection. That way my growing season is a month or two longer: obviously kale will do better in the Fall than tomatos. At the end of the growing year the beets and kale will produce greens well past the first few frosts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am considering adding some passive solar like gallon plastic milk containers painted flat black and placing them along the South exposure of the tunnel. The orientation will be length wise with the opening West and the other long side South facing. I can get 48 gallon jugs along that South side positioned where they will not interfere with my plants. Planning to use foam insulation board (4X8 R-6 Thermasheet) along the North side screwed to the frame of the greenhouse, but I have to wait to see if that will work. I want to find something with a reflective facing for that North wall. Also considering an electric fence energizer to deter the local critters (rat, pine squirrel and raccoon).
 

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Good luck. One question. If that pic is your greenhouse and that is your climate, why bother with a greenhouse? Typically greenhouses are used to start plants before spring arrives or to grow crops and vegetables during colder seasons. Even little tunnels like yours get quite warm in the summer and any plants you keep in it will need to be watered heavily as they will get no rain.
Unless you want to keep pests away from your crops.
 

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Unless you want to keep pests away from your crops.
I agree with the keeping pests away but there is also a commensurate loss of pollinators. Might be an issue depending on the crops grown AND the greenhouse may keep some larger pests at bay but there are still plenty of insect pests in a greenhouse to be a bother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I agree with the keeping pests away but there is also a commensurate loss of pollinators. Might be an issue depending on the crops grown AND the greenhouse may keep some larger pests at bay but there are still plenty of insect pests in a greenhouse to be a bother.
Planning on some quality time in the greenhouse with a hand full of cotton swabs. I'll be a busy bee!
 

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If you are planning on pollinating yourself at some point don’t use cotton swabs. The cheap little paintbrushes for kids watercolors work the best. The pollen sticks to cotton swabs too well. Plus you can clean the brush to use on other types of plants and you can’t with a swab.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you are planning on pollinating yourself at some point don’t use cotton swabs. The cheap little paintbrushes for kids watercolors work the best. The pollen sticks to cotton swabs too well. Plus you can clean the brush to use on other types of plants and you can’t with a swab.
Thanks for the heads up! I happen to have several of those little paint brushes, somewhere. Then again there is always the Dollar Store!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ok, I can't help noticing that much of the greenhouse is in the shade. That's not good. Could you put it in another location where it will get more sun?
Pics were taken late in the afternoon, and this is the sunniest spot on the property. I have a string of LED grow lights hung in the greenhouse as of this rainy morning. We'll see if this experiment is successful. Just close to $400 invested to date for the poly tunnel, ground anchors, grow lights and grow bags. Soil will be another $70. Haven't even started building the grow benches yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Got one grow bag shelf made and two indeterminate tomato plants planted, Roma and Sweet 100. I found the poly was pooling rainwater, so I inserted three nine-foot pieces of lath I had from a previous project and secured them with braided nylon twine. Doing a little at a time as the weather here still thinks it is winter. The high today didn't get out of the 50's and winds gusted to 25 mph. Better than yesterday when wind gusts hit 40 with driving rain. At least discovered the tiedowns work!

Mesh Textile Road surface Grey Wood
 
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