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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Fairly New to the site but so I hope this post meets the standards of the quality stuff I read here. Please let me know on how to improve. I bought my first 1911 about a month ago, and figured I would tell you guys about my experience.

I picked up a new Taurus PT1911 about a month ago after about 2 months of research and handling (got to know many gun store employees pretty well haha). My decision to go with Taurus was a difficult one but I believe I made the right choice (so far). For the price I could not find a better 1911 in my area. I paid $530 which from my research was the lowest price I could find. I took it to the range the next day and put 100 rounds through it, cleaned it that night and put another 200 through it the next day. I love the the way this thing shoots, pretty dang accurate and feels great in hands (as most 1911's do). The only malfunction I had was due to a couple messed up reloaded rounds. I do not believe that I have sacrificed quality and so far have nothing bad to say about the gun besides shooting expensive ammo :D:

If anyone has any questions about this gun, whether it be disassemble or or just general questions I can probably be able to help you out but I'm not a professional by any means.

Now for some pics :thumb:
003.jpg
other side
005.jpg

Edit: I think I fixed the images but here are the full res ones
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/MIPUJnjIUm-tRj3Jgiguwg?feat=directlink
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/WLim4zJZ3i1QaIMPyU50ug?feat=directlink
 

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Great looking gun! I have heard nothing but good about the Taurus PT1911, from folks who own and shoot them. The only thing I would change on that gun would be the recoil spring, throw and 18 1/2lb spring on it, really dampens recoil (gets ya back on target quickly) and also makes it cycle cleanly. I read all about doing it and thought, it can't make that much difference... finally did it and was shocked at the difference. I am sure mine had a bit to do with a more worn out stock spring, but it was a great upgrade for me.
 

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Nice looking pistol. And thanks all for the tips.

I've been looking at this gun as one my next purchases. Guess I'm on a .45 kick myself, ever since I picked up a Desert Eagle/Baby Eagle in .45 a couple months back. Solid little gun I might add;)
 

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Congratulations on your new 1911. I like the 1911 and own 3 of them that I bought in 2002. It sounds like you have already put the new weapon through a confidence test fire and it did great.

I am not sure if you used ball ammunition to do the confidence test or the self defense ammunition that you are going to be using full time?

Many 1911 models will fire ball ammunition without any tuning up but it is a different story with hollow point type ammunition, such as Federal Hydrashok ammunition. My Springfield 1911 did fine with ball but I had to have a gunsmith tune it up to fire Hydrashok ammunition without a jam.

I also own a Glock Model 21 .45 ACP and like it to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the great info guys and thanks NHCraigT for the links.

Congratulations on your new 1911. I like the 1911 and own 3 of them that I bought in 2002. It sounds like you have already put the new weapon through a confidence test fire and it did great.

I am not sure if you used ball ammunition to do the confidence test or the self defense ammunition that you are going to be using full time?

Many 1911 models will fire ball ammunition without any tuning up but it is a different story with hollow point type ammunition, such as Federal Hydrashok ammunition. My Springfield 1911 did fine with ball but I had to have a gunsmith tune it up to fire Hydrashok ammunition without a jam.

I also own a Glock Model 21 .45 ACP and like it to.
I have shot 3 kinds of ammo through it. Mostly Magtec 230g ball ammo, but also some 230g reloaded ball ammo. I have also shot 8 rounds of speer gold dot JHP. The gun just ate everything I put in it except for a few messed up reloaded rounds. Now shooting 8 rounds of JHP doesnt mean that it wont have issues and I just got lucky but I only bought one box because of the price ad just wanted to make sure it worked. Maybe if I can come by some more for a decent price I will put some more hollowpoints through it and see how it goes.

How hard is changing out the hammer?
 

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Thanks for the great info guys and thanks NHCraigT for the links.



I have shot 3 kinds of ammo through it. Mostly Magtec 230g ball ammo, but also some 230g reloaded ball ammo. I have also shot 8 rounds of speer gold dot JHP. The gun just ate everything I put in it except for a few messed up reloaded rounds. Now shooting 8 rounds of JHP doesnt mean that it wont have issues and I just got lucky but I only bought one box because of the price ad just wanted to make sure it worked. Maybe if I can come by some more for a decent price I will put some more hollowpoints through it and see how it goes.

How hard is changing out the hammer?
I couldn't help you on that question. I have two Springfield Armory and one Norinco 1911's.

I had a gunsmith do all of the work on my weapons.

Here is a great reference library on 1911's.

http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech_library.htm
 
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I don't want to come off as a know it all, but I do have a lot of experience with 1911's. I would get the heaviest recoil spring that will still let the gun function properly. Check out this site: http://www.wilsoncombat.com/a_springs_recoil.asp

I'd get a 24# and a 20# spring from Wilson. Test the gun with several of the rounds you shoot with each spring. If it still functions w/o error w/ a 24# spring, use that and keep the 20# spring as a back up. I would change springs every 2 to 3 thousand rounds. Wilson sells quality spare parts for 1911's.

For all 1911 owners, most failure to feed issues with 1911's are caused by the magazine. I highly suggest getting the Wilson 47-D magazines for any 1911. JMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I don't want to come off as a know it all, but I do have a lot of experience with 1911's. I would get the heaviest recoil spring that will still let the gun function properly. Check out this site: http://www.wilsoncombat.com/a_springs_recoil.asp

I'd get a 24# and a 20# spring from Wilson. Test the gun with several of the rounds you shoot with each spring. If it still functions w/o error w/ a 24# spring, use that and keep the 20# spring as a back up. I would change springs every 2 to 3 thousand rounds. Wilson sells quality spare parts for 1911's.

For all 1911 owners, most failure to feed issues with 1911's are caused by the magazine. I highly suggest getting the Wilson 47-D magazines for any 1911. JMHO.
What does changing the recoil spring to a heavier one do? New to modifying guns so sorry if I sound ignorant.
 

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What does changing the recoil spring to a heavier one do? New to modifying guns so sorry if I sound ignorant.
This is a better explanation than I would have typed up...

http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech/reliability_secrets.htm


The correct recoil spring poundage is important to the reliability of your pistol. Too light a spring will batter the pistol and weaken the chambering process; too heavy a spring will result in failures to extract and eject, or in "stovepipe" stoppages. A too-heavy spring is also rough on the extractor. A too-quick closing of the slide will force the extractor over the rim of the cartridge, rather than allowing the cartridge to move up under the extractor in a controlled feed. It also has the effect of battering the slide stop unduly. The stock recoil spring in a standard 1911 is rated at 16 pounds. Moving up one notch to 18 ½ pounds will be about right for most pistols shooting hardball and other full-power defense ammo. Anything heavier is too much. Be sure to test the new recoil spring by shooting the pistol one-handed and loosely. It should function positively. If not, go back to the 16-pound spring.

An extra-power recoil spring also aids in preventing the slide from opening too soon. You may have seen "skid marks" on primers, caused by the firing pin still being extended against the primer when the slide unlocks. Eventually, this could break the firing pin. The use of a heavier recoil spring often cures this problem.

Commander-size pistols do well with a 20-pound spring for full-power ammo, and Officer’s-size pistols utilize a 24-pound spring well for the same purpose. As long as it’s not overdone, a stiffer recoil spring will aid in positive chambering and lengthen the life of the pistol. If the slide becomes difficult to retract using a stiffer spring, consider using one of the progressive-rate springs which are easier to get started at the start of the slide’s recoil stroke. The jury is out as far as the so-called "shock buffers" are concerned. These little polymer doughnuts slip over the recoil spring guide and cushion the shock of the slide banging against the end of the recoil spring guide. To this extent they are good, but they must be replaced regularly as they get chewed up. Having one disintegrate inside a defense pistol in a pucker situation is not something I would want to have happen, and for that reason I don’t use them. Likewise, there is controversy over the use of a full-length recoil spring guide in a defense pistol. Theoretically, the full-length guide keeps the recoil spring from kinking in its channel, and assures uniformity in the recoil stroke. It has the disadvantage of preventing a "press check" of the pistol, and of preventing one-handed racking of the slide by pressing the recoil spring plug against a shelf, shoe or other solid object. It is doubtful if the full-length guide increases accuracy, but you may gain some life from the recoil spring. Recoil springs should be replaced about every 2-3 thousand rounds anyway, as they gradually lose their strength over time and usage.
 

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Congratulations on your new 1911. I like the 1911 and own 3 of them that I bought in 2002. It sounds like you have already put the new weapon through a confidence test fire and it did great.

I am not sure if you used ball ammunition to do the confidence test or the self defense ammunition that you are going to be using full time?

Many 1911 models will fire ball ammunition without any tuning up but it is a different story with hollow point type ammunition, such as Federal Hydrashok ammunition. My Springfield 1911 did fine with ball but I had to have a gunsmith tune it up to fire Hydrashok ammunition without a jam.

I also own a Glock Model 21 .45 ACP and like it to.
+1...burn through some of your self-defense loads now and make sure she likes them. 1911s are fine looking guns aren't they? Enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow thanks guys great info. So If I understand correctly the heavier 18lb spring with increase the reliability of the 1911. Also yes the hammer lock is kinda dumb and I dont use it, I never thought about replacing it until now.... Then I saw everything else I could buy....boy this is going to get expensive haha.

As far as shooting through the defensive ammo, are there any you guys could recommend that are usually 1911 friendly?
 

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At best, with a stock 5" barrel on a Taurus you will get a 2.5" group at 25 yards. Best bet is to invest in a match barrel first.... . . .or a Glock. But then again, when you are hurling ashtrays down range at 1080fps whats the difference.

Any way, nice looking piece :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
At best, with a stock 5" barrel on a Taurus you will get a 2.5" group at 25 yards. Best bet is to invest in a match barrel first.... . . .or a Glock. But then again, when you are hurling ashtrays down range at 1080fps whats the difference.

Any way, nice looking piece :)
At 25 yards 2.5" groups doesnt seem that bad... Is there a difference in "match" grade barrels, because Taurus says mine has a "match" grade barrel so are the aftermarket one just better?
 

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IMO your barrel is just fine as is. Do you plan on shooting competition with this pistol? If so, you will put some money in it. If not, just buy ammo! Forget all the fancy stuff, it will perform just fine as it is. The Spring is just a very easy and cheap upgrade that can really make your experience with the gun a lot better. When you can cycle through mag after mag without a hiccup, you WILL have fun!:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
IMO your barrel is just fine as is. Do you plan on shooting competition with this pistol? If so, you will put some money in it. If not, just buy ammo! Forget all the fancy stuff, it will perform just fine as it is. The Spring is just a very easy and cheap upgrade that can really make your experience with the gun a lot better. When you can cycle through mag after mag without a hiccup, you WILL have fun!:thumb:
No I don't plan on shooting competition, this is going to be a defensive/fun pistol. I mean i want accuracy but Im pretty sure the stock barrel is good for me. Th spring does sound like something I'm going to do. I see alot of 18# springs, would that suffice or is the 18.5 the one to have. Or would I be better with a kit that comes with a few different springs?
 
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