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Discussion Starter #1
i have seen alot of packs around so i figured i would post mine if you have any questions. I am currently taking first aid and emt classes. All of the advanced medical Items are pointless with out proper training. Many items and procedures can be harmful or fatal without proper training. Just remember that before you buy many items.


My kit contains Items like
****All items are sterile****
medical needle and thread
needles
blood test tubes
Iv hook up
assorted pills and creams
bandages
eye patches
slings
Quick Cast
Plaster bandage
Hydrogen Peroxide 3%
Tweezers
scissors

lots of other items i am working on getting quick clot





 

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Diamond Dog
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Hey, thats the pack i use, It's attached by molle and zipties to a shoulder bag, i use it for carrying gear when i go for long hikes in the woods.
 

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i have seen alot of packs around so i figured i would post mine if you have any questions. I am currently taking first aid and emt classes. All of the advanced medical Items are pointless with out proper training. Many items and procedures can be harmful or fatal without proper training. Just remember that before you buy many items.


My kit contains Items like
****All items are sterile****
medical needle and thread
needles
blood test tubes
Iv hook up
assorted pills and creams
bandages
eye patches
slings
Quick Cast
Plaster bandage
Hydrogen Peroxide 3%
Tweezers
scissors

lots of other items i am working on getting quick clot







just my opinion

drop the blood tubes. Dont know what you plan to do with them, but i have a very extensive ALS kit in my car and i dont have any. Also as you will learn that blood hemalizes after a short period of time. If someone isnt looking at that blood in a machine or under a microscope within an hour. Its pretty much toast. You can drop these and make more room of essentials.

some to get items....
kling/roller guaze
forceps(hard to suture without them, tweezers are good but forceps are better)
tape
triangle bandage(lots of ueses and very cheap)
scalpel
you said you have needles..IV needles or syringe needles? get both if you can
assorted syringes
iodione for cleaning(wipes are very small and cheap, they also have swaps)
tongue depressors(cheap and small)
couple pairs of gloves. (cheap, dont take up much room and helpful in nasty areas)

Hope this helps. If anybody needs help with medical and medical supplies reference websites. contact me. I have a couple. Good luck
N-
 

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Leave Me Alone
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just my opinion

drop the blood tubes. Dont know what you plan to do with them, but i have a very extensive ALS kit in my car and i dont have any. Also as you will learn that blood hemalizes after a short period of time. If someone isnt looking at that blood in a machine or under a microscope within an hour. Its pretty much toast. You can drop these and make more room of essentials.

some to get items....
kling/roller guaze
forceps(hard to suture without them, tweezers are good but forceps are better)
tape
triangle bandage(lots of ueses and very cheap)
scalpel
you said you have needles..IV needles or syringe needles? get both if you can
assorted syringes
iodione for cleaning(wipes are very small and cheap, they also have swaps)
tongue depressors(cheap and small)
couple pairs of gloves. (cheap, dont take up much room and helpful in nasty areas)

Hope this helps. If anybody needs help with medical and medical supplies reference websites. contact me. I have a couple. Good luck
N-

Yep, good idea. I was an EMT-I for several years and the vast majority of "stuff" never got used on the street. However in a wilderness or long term survival situation, we could end up using alot more of the everyday items like Band-aids, guaze pads and tape, eye wash, peroxide, etc. I sometimes question the suture kits. I had a doctor friend who was hours away from help and got a large laceration on his leg that needed sutures. He said he had a very hard time suturing with no antistetic. So he cleaned the area well with alcohol and degreased the skin. He took some strips of the old white first aid tape, pinched the wound closed and put strips of tape across it to close it. He also heard of a guy who put strips of duct tape along side the wound, and folded one edge of the tape under, before taping it down, then sewed the wound closed with needle and thread by sewing the tape edges together across the wound. He said he just couldn't sew his skin shut like Rambo did.:eek:
 

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Yep, good idea. I was an EMT-I for several years and the vast majority of "stuff" never got used on the street. However in a wilderness or long term survival situation, we could end up using alot more of the everyday items like Band-aids, guaze pads and tape, eye wash, peroxide, etc. I sometimes question the suture kits. I had a doctor friend who was hours away from help and got a large laceration on his leg that needed sutures. He said he had a very hard time suturing with no antistetic. So he cleaned the area well with alcohol and degreased the skin. He took some strips of the old white first aid tape, pinched the wound closed and put strips of tape across it to close it. He also heard of a guy who put strips of duct tape along side the wound, and folded one edge of the tape under, before taping it down, then sewed the wound closed with needle and thread by sewing the tape edges together across the wound. He said he just couldn't sew his skin shut like Rambo did.:eek:
Thats a pretty darn nifty trick there, thanks for sharing. I'll be honest, I dont know if I could suture myself up on a nasty wound, so something like that could come in handy. Also if you had to suture up a small child who was screaming and flailing, that may be the way to handle it.
 

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One more thing to throw into the ole medic bag.

Super Glue (or Crazy Glue)

Excellent item to use for closing those wounds that need a suture or two. Not to be used on something that a real doctor will need to investigate. However, that nasty cut on your finger or leg or arm that is an inch or three long and deep enough that it should have stitches, Super Glue is the thing to have. A drop or two and you have closed the wound sufficiently that it won't be gaping open for the infections to get in.

One thing you may want to do is not completely close a large wound like this. Leave an 1/8" section at one end unsealed. This will allow for drainage of puss and other nasty stuff.

And pulling tape off a large wound tends to reopen the wound. You won't need to remove the Super Glue.
 

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I'm your huckleberry
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Also...get plenty of tape...medical is good, duct tape is good too. Sam Splints are very handy and less messy that trying to plaster a fracture in the boonies.
 

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Gettin' there
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Thumbs up for mentioning Super Glue & Liquid Bandage. I would much prefer either before stitches. However, if you do have the materials for stitches and don't think you could stitch yourself up, order some Lidocaine 2% injection.
You can numb the area before you stitch. There are plenty of places online that describe how to use.
I also recommend ordering topical lidocaine either in cream or jelly form.

You can also use the injectable lidocaine in a dental emergency. I spoke to a friend in dental school and he showed me how/where to inject in the mouth if you have tooth pain or need to yank a tooth out (if you can't get to a dentist).

I am fortunate to have an RN bugging in with me. We are going to give each other 'classes' on how to do things so we'll be a more rounded group.

Unless you have a HIGH tolerance for pain, it's doubtful you could give yourself stitches. Anyone who has had stitches knows how bad it hurts!

I got stitches in my hand when I was 7 yrs old w/o any numbing solution. After all these years, I still remember the pain from the needle sewing me up. Which hurt much worse than almost cutting my thumb off.
 

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instead of super glue wouldnt it be better to use liquid bandage ?

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=87786&catid=44601
Liquid Bandage won't actually hold even a medium laceration shut (tried it a number of times). It is useful for covering over scratches and scrapes. Superglue is actually used quite extensively in the military for wounds and works well (again, used it a number of times for cuts up to 2" long and 1/2" or more deep). I wouldn't try to use it to close up an artery...but if you have an artery open and you don't know what you're doing, you're hosed. Lot's of military trauma medicine training specifies the use of superglue in the field for certain types of wounds.

--Wintermute
 

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I can't paste the link but for home I bought the M-17 medic bag from US Cav. It's on they're web site under " field equipment". Looks great. Lots o stuff. For my Go Bag I have 4 small band aids
4 large band aids
Small vial hydrogen peroxide
Ace bandage
Rolled gauze
Medical tape
2 packets imodium
Tweezers
 

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Discussion Starter #15
very good idea with the Lidocaine i found a site that has them for 24 bucks for 50 vials.


thanks for all the ideas


Thumbs up for mentioning Super Glue & Liquid Bandage. I would much prefer either before stitches. However, if you do have the materials for stitches and don't think you could stitch yourself up, order some Lidocaine 2% injection.
You can numb the area before you stitch. There are plenty of places online that describe how to use.
I also recommend ordering topical lidocaine either in cream or jelly form.

You can also use the injectable lidocaine in a dental emergency. I spoke to a friend in dental school and he showed me how/where to inject in the mouth if you have tooth pain or need to yank a tooth out (if you can't get to a dentist).

I am fortunate to have an RN bugging in with me. We are going to give each other 'classes' on how to do things so we'll be a more rounded group.

Unless you have a HIGH tolerance for pain, it's doubtful you could give yourself stitches. Anyone who has had stitches knows how bad it hurts!

I got stitches in my hand when I was 7 yrs old w/o any numbing solution. After all these years, I still remember the pain from the needle sewing me up. Which hurt much worse than almost cutting my thumb off.
 

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I hardly ever see tourniquets mentioned. They will be a part of my med kit for sure.
As long as you are aware of the latest greatest who/what/when/where/why to use them, good.

My understanding of the latest TCCC (Tactical Combat Casuality Care) protocols for the use of a TQ (tourniquet) is to use it to control severe life threatening bleeding until you can get to a "safe" area to use the other bleeding control protocols.

Those being direct pressure, elevation, pressure points, hemostatic agents etc.
 

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Liquid Bandage won't actually hold even a medium laceration shut (tried it a number of times). It is useful for covering over scratches and scrapes. Superglue is actually used quite extensively in the military for wounds and works well (again, used it a number of times for cuts up to 2" long and 1/2" or more deep). I wouldn't try to use it to close up an artery...but if you have an artery open and you don't know what you're doing, you're hosed. Lot's of military trauma medicine training specifies the use of superglue in the field for certain types of wounds.

--Wintermute
is there a certain brand they use or will any super glue work?

also would you put it on the wound like drops to close it kinda like stitches or would you put down a bead along the wound covering the entire wound?
 

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Random points here:
Liquid bandage is not a wound closure, it is a dressing. It will not work to close a wound so don't plan on using it as such. For the weight of the bottle you can carry more dressings.

Superglue works, but is exothermic- it gives off heat as it cures, which can damage surrounding tissue. Do not use it for sensitive areas. Dermabond (and similar solutions) is designed for wound closure; as such it is formulated slightly different and is not as exothermic. It is not appropriate for use on all wounds and can make a bad situation worse.
http://www.dermabond.com/sites/all/files/uploads/EPI.pdf

If you don't know how to suture, LEARN beforehand. You can do a LOT more damage by improperly closing a wound than by leaving it open. There are plenty of manuals out on suturing- read them and actually practice it. You need several things in addition to the needle and thread to suture; instead of telling you, I’ll just say read up on suturing. If you don’t learn, don’t suture!

2% Lidocaine is generally used in dental work- 1% and 1% with epinephrine are usually used in wound closure (depends on the region of the body). Do not use Lido w/ epi on ears, nose, fingers, toes or genitals. Some people have sensitivities to Lidocaine. As badly as lidocaine burns, if you only need a couple of sutures you may be able to close the wound faster and easier w/o it.

Staples are much easier to put in, especially in yourself. They don't look as pretty as sutures, but they work very well for some applications. You don't need lidocaine with them, pop and go usually works just fine. Again, if you don't know how to or which wounds need closing and which don't and how to properly prepare a wound for closure- don't close it. Wounds left open will granulate in on their own, they'll just be ugly (there are ways of dressing these to reduce scarring).

Steristrips work very well for small lacerations and don't tend to scar as badly as sutures in some applications. Have some benzoin tincture ampules with them for increased adhesion.

The point I’m trying to make in the above is that there are other ways to close a wound and that there are many other factors than just- wow! Laceration, sew it shut. Even after you get it shut you need to know proper wound care.

What do you plan to do with the syringes? If you don't have any injectable medications they aren't good for much else and may run you afoul of the law if you ever get searched. A curved tip syringe or irrigation syringe is a better choice (for wound cleaning).

Keep your pills in the original packaging if at all possible. Blister packs are great for this. Again, trying to explain to the cop on the side of the road what your various colored pills are is not going to go well; none that I know carry a PDR with them.

What “assorted creams” do you need? Triple antibiotic and burn gel (OTC) /silvadene (prescription- know where and when to use it) will cover most any problem. Some betadine solution/ointment is nice too (another multiuse item).

Drop the blood tubes. If you don’t have a lab with you they’re worthless.

What do you plan to do with the plaster bandage? Do you know how to set a bone? It usually takes more than one in most cases anyways. They are heavy and generally bulky. Add a Sam splint, a finger splint (commonly broken bones) and the knowledge of how to improvise.

Add an ACE bandage. Multiuse item that works for pressure dressings too.

Make sure you put your supplies in ziplocks or something else waterproof. Water soaks right through the paper wraps on dressings. Vacuum packing bulky items works well.

Know what allergies you and anyone in your party might have. There are an increasing number of people who are allergic to latex and some types of medical tape for example.

These are all just basic suggestions. Remember, EMT class prepares you for basic package and transport, it does not teach you anything advanced or any long term care. It’s a great start, and I’d definitely suggest wilderness EMT also, but anything out of your scope of practice you will most likely have to learn on your own. Fortunately there are many good books on the subject and it’s not an impossibility by any stretch.
 

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Know what allergies you and anyone in your party might have. There are an increasing number of people who are allergic to latex and some types of medical tape for example.
Amazing post! I've read so many people talk about suturing wounds and I'm glad to finally see someone bring up staples and Steirstrips (IMO the most effective methods when working on yourself).

I would add one item that does require a script and it touches on the point of allergies. One or two EpiPens are essential in treating anaphylaxis at least temporarily. My wife has stopped breathing a couple of times and without some quick action on behalf of others and her EpiPen, she wouldn't be here today. You never know what you might encounter and a serious allergic reaction is a real threat no matter what the situation.
 
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