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Discussion Starter #1
Dig 2 ponds near each other.

Set a water tight fiberglass tank of your size and choosing into a dry pond bed, you will need a dirty water pump for this.

Once the tank is set, camo the tank with green plastic leaves and stuff and fill the pond. You can either stash stuff or hunker down in it depending upon how creative you are.

Of course if you decided to hunker down in it you would need to install a periscope and snorkel and have way to pump the water in and out of the pond from inside the tank.

The snorkel and periscope you can conceal using a fountain, who would know? Its just an idea I have, if anyone would like to build on this idea feel free.
 

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Sounds like a good idea at first, but you've got a few complications:

Will the tank withstand the water pressure? The pressure of several feet of water on the outside pushing in will be different, and probably larger, than the tank's capacity pushing out from the inside. It might collapse.

You need somewhere to pump the water to while you're building it.

Would you build a hatch at above surface level to get in and out through, or would you need to drain the pond to get in and out?




That said, it's a neat idea, and could use some looking into. Being submerged underwater should be just as good protection as being buried underground... and possibly much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The pressure thing could be a problem, it wouldn't be good to be inside when it crushs. I was thinking that it would be shallow thats why I added the plastic leaf camo on the exterior. For a personal bunker it would be a task. I have sank 5 gal. buckets full of wheat for 24 hours and they did not leak or crush. I tied a cinder block to the handle and ran another line to the surface with a float attached.
 

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I'm just going to put on my invisible cloak and hide in plain sight.:rolleyes:

Most tanks that you would find on the market are for holding stuff in. What could go wrong?
 

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This is not actually a bad idea but the cost would be more than you think. You face a few problems like how you will generate oxygen in your bunker if you plan to be in it for anything longer than 24 hours.
The pressure is not really a problem if the water over your bunker is less than 10 feet deep.

You can purchase any number of already built fiberglass or plastic containers to use under the water. Example most likely to work is a Septic tank. yes, they make large industrial septic tanks that are meant to be buried 30 feet deep so they can withstand the pressure of the water and they are waterproof.

Here is an example:



This is an industrial size septic tank made of fiberglass and I'm not sure if the opening is big enough to fit a man but you could modify the opening without too much trouble I'd think. For Oxygen you might could run pipe under ground away from the pond and have the opening of the pipe come up somewhere hidden in the woods surrounding the area. You could even possible find a hollowed out tree and have the pipe come out inside the tree.
Then place a mesh screen over the pipe to keep debris from getting into it or have it angled like a periscope and use a flapper valve on it to keep debris out.
Then use a suction fan to suck air into your bunker.

Of course this is all speculation and I'm no engineer.
 

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Then use a suction fan to suck air into your bunker.

It would be best to have the intake at one side of the bunker (filtered*) and the outflow at the other, otherwise, it could just flow from one to the other without refreshing your breathing air.

*If you're going to make a bunker, you might as well make it fallout/bio/chem proof.
Continuous ventilation rates for whole-building ventilation can be determined by calculation. To calculate the required flow, count 1 cfm (cubic foot per minute) per 100 square feet of floor area to account for the building. Next, to account for the occupants, multiply the number of bedrooms plus one (which assumes two occupants in the master bedroom) by 7.5 cfm (cubic feet per minute). Then add those results together. For example, a 1,500-square-foot house with three bedrooms would require 45 cfm (15 cfm for the building plus 30 cfm for the four occupants).

The standard allows a wide variety of ventilation systems to be used from supply or exhaust fans to heat recovery ventilators (HRV) or energy recovery ventilators (ERV). Standard bath fans can be used to meet the continuous requirements if they move the required amount of air and are quiet – 1.0 sone or less based on HVI-Certified performance data.

Additionally, bathroom fans should be able to operate at 50 cfm intermittently or 20 cfm continuously. A kitchen fan should be able to move 100 cfm intermittently or provide 5 air changes per hour continuously based on the volume of the kitchen. When used to meet the intermittent ventilation requirements, both kitchen range hoods and bathroom fans must be HVI-Certified at no more than 3.0 sones.
That should help you figure out how much ventilation is needed.
Basically the amount needed depends on volume, number of people inside, and presence of bathrooms or kitchens.


Also, yes the concerns listed above about keeping it from floating are quite legitimate; I hadn't thought of that.
You'll need to devise some way to weigh it down.
How much weight do you need?
(Amount of water the bunker displaces * weight of water) - weight of bunker when empty = Amount of weight that needs to be added.
Note though, that if you add weight to the outside of the bunker, it will increase the amount of water displaced.
Also note, any permanent fixtures that won't be removed from the bunker can be added to the empty bunker weight, but they need to be added before the bunker is submerged.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I guess what this is turning into is a submarine, to keep it from popping up we'd need some kind of balast or anchor it to the bottom with large concrete blocks. This would be a cool project if I could make it work cheaply. Being underwater would be great during, forest fire, earthquake.

Until I figure the cost of this thing for now I will just stick to using the pond to sink 5 gallon buckets of preps. I think this idea is better than burying them, easier to get to in a hury. Also if you wanted to hide guns it would work good, I can't imagine a metal detector would work in water.
 

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Remember The Alamo
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i would try to buy a peice of land that had an old mine shaft on it ,the hole is already dug. Course I'm just thinking out loud
 

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what I would do instead would have an under water exit from a bunker make the exit tunnel like a sidways S shaped like the gas trap on a toilet and some type of exit that wont get filled with sediment or debris

reason a bunker under water is bad is water doesnt compress so if theres an explosion your shelter is gone the pillboxes and bunkers at normandy to destroy them they blocked up the ports filled with water and put in a lil demo and busted em open like eggs
I would imagine it would do the opposite if any substantial earthquake or explosion goes off near it and also water is not as solid/strong as dirt/stone also I would be ****ed if i was sleepin in my bunker an it sprung a leak while i was asleep and woke to my thing almost flooded having to escape open the hatch possibly underwater and trying to open it with 1the weight of 10ft of water above keeping it closed and having to wait for it to flood to be able to open the door and get out
 

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Standing Vigilant
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Slaps head and utters WTF?
Are you freakin' kiddin' me?
Why not just bury yourself alive?

Sorry, it's late and I'm 2 glasses into a great bottle of wine.

Oh brother...........Is this what we have come to.

Doginit
 

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Watchin tha world go by
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Sounds more like Davey Jones' locker...
or an expensive coffin.
sorry - never liked bunkers, dont like being somewhere that draws fire, and heavy weapons attention.
To paraphrase Erwin Rommel - "mobility means salvation more surely than a foxnole
 

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Guardian of Liberty
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caisson disease

You will likely wind up with decompression sickness. Any scuba diver can tell you that they spent a great deal of time learning about it. Even though you will be in a dry container below the water it will affect you. Do a search on "caisson disease" and you will begin to understand the hazards you are looking to put yourself into.

just my .02
 

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I am whatever I say I am
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Bury it? Are you crazy? If I got my hands on an old submarine, even a Gato class, I would want it to be fully functional. It would truly be the ultimate BOV... :thumb:

BTW, does anyone know where to find surplus torpedoes? :eek:



hick
I doubt you can find a fully functional surplus sub, even if it's some WW2 junk. That would have been a find of a lifetime for terrorists or smugglers of all kinds. I don't know if old subs can even be purchased, but if they could, I imagine they would have been stripped of engines, equipment etc. What they would offer however, is hull integrity. You should be able to bury that hulk of metal in the ground and not worry about it collapsing on you. In theory.
 
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