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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A while back I wrote a post about my poncho tent setups and also showed my homemade sleeping bag (pics below). Last night, I was wondering how well it would fare this time of year (though it was NOT intended for winter camping). So I gave it a try.

Equipment: Genuine WWII US Navy blanket (wool), folded over and sewn into a bag and inserted into a space blanket bag (a folded over space blanket taped with packaging tape). The nested bags were placed on a cheap-o sleeping pad.

Clothing: Top and bottom long johns, wool socks over normal socks, beanie.

Environment: My back porch (cold concrete).

Temperature: 14 F, -10 C.

Duration: 45 minutes.


I decided to go back inside after 45 minutes because I was bored. :D: There was almost no perceptable change in temperature inside the bag after lying still for 45 minutes. I checked the time every once in a while and actually noticed that my cell phone was working sluggishly!

I was totally surprised by this. I had expected to be shivering after about 10 - 15 minutes. Not the case at all. I won't be using this setup for winter camping, but it's nice to know that it would work in an emergency and that I would probably survive the night (with a fire built outside). I'm also confident that my 3-season sleeping bag nested inside these two bags will keep me warm while winter camping, but that test will have to wait until tonight...

EDIT: I am aware that the temperature inside the bags will drop overnight, and that a 45-minute test is not representative of a night's sleep. If I were in a real survival situation with this setup, I would take steps to try to improve my chances for survival (put a hot water bottle in the bag, eat something before I go to sleep, build a fire close by etc.).
 

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Deo VIndice
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The only thing I have ever hated about sleeping close to the fire for extra warmth is:

1) Eventually the fire dies down/out and I wake up cuz it gets colder
2) I wake up in the morning and the outside of the bag and my hair are wet and have ash all over them.

I hate dragging a tent around, sometimes just hanging a small tarp overhead is just as good, although if it gets windy, it dosen't do so well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The only thing I have ever hated about sleeping close to the fire for extra warmth is:

1) Eventually the fire dies down/out and I wake up cuz it gets colder
2) I wake up in the morning and the outside of the bag and my hair are wet and have ash all over them.

I hate dragging a tent around, sometimes just hanging a small tarp overhead is just as good, although if it gets windy, it dosen't do so well.
My test was pretty much just out of curiosity to see how the bag would fare for a short time. I would not use this bag as a winter sleeping bag close to a fire.

Thanks for the input.
 

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V
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Interesting setup bmatt, how does the "space blanket bag" hold up for durability?

I've no experience with the item and I'm nosey :D:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting setup bmatt, how does the "space blanket bag" hold up for durability?

I've no experience with the item and I'm nosey :D:
Actually, surprisingly well, so far. I used a good quality, wide packaging tape to seal the bag (it is clear and you can't really see it on the bag). I also tried this setup for about 5 minutes last summer just to see how easy it is to get in and out of it. It makes a lot of noise while you're moving, but has shown no signs of tearing or wearing. If it did tear after a few trips, I'd either repair it or go down to the store and buy another for pocket change.

I will be trying it out as a warm-weather summer bag this coming summer, and will lay down a rugged ground cloth first to prevent the space blanket bag from tearing.
 

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(put a hot water bottle in the bag, ...).

I've done that a few times. Those things are the cat's meow. One cautionary note, use hot water not boiling water.

Another note. Space blankets don't breath. If one was using this setup for any duration be sure to turn the bag inside out and hang/place in the sun to let the wool inside dry out.

Good post.

Cheers,
-Per.
 

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Earthwalker.
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Its good to test your kit,which i try to do as often as i can.

I don't use a hot water bottle,what i do use is one of thoses metal water bottles with hot water in it and wrap it in a bandana.:thumb:
 

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6 Boys and 13 Hands
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Try sleeping naked.:eek: Yes I'm serious the Inuit have been doing it for thousands of years. But I do suggest that you have adequate padding beneath you and layered blankets or a adequate sleeping bag. I have done this but I believe it wasn't that cold.
Google "Sleeping naked+hypothermia". You will get mixed results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Try sleeping naked.:eek: Yes I'm serious the Inuit have been doing it for thousands of years. But I do suggest that you have adequate padding beneath you and layered blankets or a adequate sleeping bag. I have done this but I believe it wasn't that cold.
Google "Sleeping naked+hypothermia". You will get mixed results.
I read about that in a book on the Netsilingmiut. Reindeer skins with the fur attached are amazingly warm, and igloos often have an inside temperature of around 50 degrees.
 

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Try sleeping naked.:eek: Yes I'm serious the Inuit have been doing it for thousands of years. But I do suggest that you have adequate padding beneath you and layered blankets or a adequate sleeping bag. I have done this but I believe it wasn't that cold.
Google "Sleeping naked+hypothermia". You will get mixed results.
That makes sense. My hands get colder in gloves than in mittens because they're separated, so I figure the same must go for an entire clothed body, right? :B
 

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A while back I wrote a post about my poncho tent setups and also showed my homemade sleeping bag (pics below). Last night, I was wondering how well it would fare this time of year (though it was NOT intended for winter camping). So I gave it a try.

Equipment: Genuine WWII US Navy blanket (wool), folded over and sewn into a bag and inserted into a space blanket bag (a folded over space blanket taped with packaging tape). The nested bags were placed on a cheap-o sleeping pad.

Clothing: Top and bottom long johns, wool socks over normal socks, beanie.

Environment: My back porch (cold concrete).

Temperature: 14 F, -10 C.

Duration: 45 minutes.
i have always been skeptical of "emergency blankets" being used in this manner because of moisture accumulation inside. did you have any moisture problems? if so, maybe a hold punch every 6 inches or something would be enough to ventilate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i have always been skeptical of "emergency blankets" being used in this manner because of moisture accumulation inside. did you have any moisture problems? if so, maybe a hold punch every 6 inches or something would be enough to ventilate.
I did not notice any moisture on the inside of the bag after the test, but it was only 45 minutes long. A longer test might have different results regarding moisture.
 
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