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CTP
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So, I just about have my survival/GHB/BOB completed and now I am (this weekend) starting to get my food prep/storage situated. Here is how I want to go about getting started but need some advice.

My plan is to begin with the "fun" food storage and later move into the bulk storage of food. What I mean by "fun food" are the items I can buy in bulk at places like Costco, Sam's and the like. Later I will buy the bulk bags and containers of the Grains, Legumes, powderd this and that once I get more knowlegdable on what to get and how to use them and cook with them.

Question: What should I start with? Looking at getting started with things like decent quantities of tuna, meats, vegies and fruits in cans, pastas and sauses, etc. The problem is that I'm really not sure what else to get that has a decent shelf life (1-2 years). What say you? Any and all advice is appreciated as this time of month is when we both are paid with plenty of cash to to prep.
Thanks
 

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Look up Wendy Dewitt on youtube. She has a great video on food storage.

Don't forget things like flour, salt, sugar, spices and dried beans. If you don't already eat it, then don't buy it.
 

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Any can of food, no matter what it is, will last years as long as the can is intact, not bulging or rusted, etc. Buy what you like most to eat. Proteins and fats are especially important for SHTF and afterwards.

Get a good balance of foods that are packed in water (like veggies), can be eaten without being cooked (like pork and beans or meats), are high calorie, and can go a long way in a meal. (Spam can go a longer way than a can of macaroni, for instance).

If you are going to buy pasta, for instance, figure out how you want to serve it and what you need to buy for various recipes, not just one kind of spaghetti sauce but different sauces you might like. Same for everything you buy.

You may want to buy dry beans, but a few cans of beans might be good too in case you are low on cooking fuel or can't take the time for it to cook. Different additions to beans also makes different menus...cheese sauce, canned ham, canned jalapenos, etc.

Buy some foods you like that you can't grow where you live, like cocoa, peanut butter, or canned pineapple, maybe.

Just go through the store and find items that you like and have fun. Be sure to keep an inventory of what you have so you have a good balance.

I don't think I'd wait long to buy the bulk items like rice or beans. Rice especially is going up in price quite a bit, but also these items are cheap and go a long way in providing many meals with a lot of variety. Buy them at the same time as the other supplies.

Don't forget salt and oil or fat for frying and other purposes.
 

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My advice: Water first. Always water first. I don't know how many "I have 6 months worth of food and 2 cases of water" type posts I've seen. You can live for weeks without food, but only a couple days without water. So water should be first priority. Store as much as possible, and try to plan out every method of obtaining more.

Water can also be the cheapest prep, but the one that takes the most thought and detective work. It took me several years to finally come across a tanking system that held as much as I wanted, that I could afford.

Then poke around the food threads. It's one of our most common topics here. There are many threads full of great info on what to store, how to package it for long term storage, where and how to store it, even recipes for using it.
 

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I would buy double or triple of what you all ready buy then you will have started. Sometimes the hard part is finding buckets and ect. So that's the next place to start. Sometimes you can find them on Craig's list or fast food places. You can ask for gallon glass jars and buckets.
In my house, on my shelf, I use glass gallon jars for flour, sugar and other bulk items. Then in my main storage I have 5 gallon buckets that I put my 25# bag of bulk items in. When jars in the house get low then I tap into the bucket. I also have #10 cans for flour, sugar and ect for LONG term storage. I know that I have a 10-30 year life on those depending on what they are so I don't use those unless I'm getting close.
Rotate Rotate Rotate.
My way of thought is....If I have to go to the store for something I ran out of (other then fresh milk and produce [during the winter] ) then I was not prepared. When I cook it comes from storage...when I shop it replaces what I used and will end up being used in a year or so from the date I purchased it. This goes for first aid supplies, cleaning, bathroom you name it. With the exception of animal food. For some reason I just have not done that one.
Good luck-It's easy once you start!
 

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Peanut butter, pasta,tuna, chicken,soup,Bisquick,rice,flour,corn meal,chili,oatmeal,cereal, instant potato ,olive oil,salt sugar, baking power, powder milk and powder cheese, tomato paste,gravy, can fruit, multivitamin coffee, tea, Tang, honey etc. This should be a good start.

You will want to get food grade bucket with Mylar and oxygen absorbers for the dry goods.You will be needing shelving units for the stack of buckets.
 

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25 Or 6 to 4
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Water is always first. Berkey or monolithic. Lots of good member information here for food.

Golden tip: Rwite not only the date purchased but also the date that we assume its expired.

This will give a 'hot' date that preps needs to be replaced and makes a very quick inventory.
 

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Blessed
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I agree with the water. I don't feel like I could ever have enough water. that being said, buy the canned foods that you LIKE to eat. Check the expiration dates and go by the saying, first in, first out. I won't stock mackeral because I don't like it but I will stock canned tuna, salmon, spam, etc. I just refuse to spend my money on something we won't eat. I just buy more of what we will eat.

If you want to buy the bigger , long term items, I suggest you go to Sams or Costco. It seems they have that stuff over the emergency places.

Good luck on your journey and feel free to ask any questions but try to remember to use the search function first.

Suzanne
 

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Limpin to safety.
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Fun foods? I get it. Foods can be fun.

Survivalists love to eat. :)

Comfort foods not only taste great, but they raise moral.

Brew mentioned water. Let me expand on that. I bought vitamin rich powdered drink flavoring from the LDS. Came in a #10 Can. Not only does it taste great, store well (even after being opened, then lidded) but it's healthy. The only draw back is the red food coloring.

Before I can really go into this though, I need to know about you. Do you like to cook?

Personally, I LOVE to cook. I think I am pretty good at it. So for fun foods, I personally can cooking materials I will need for my recipes.

Some of the Board supporters however have really delicious fun foods #10 canned for very reasonable prices. I will find you some links.
 

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first make sure it is stuff you eat now.

canned meats: chicken, tuna, chili,
canned soups
dry pasta
canned fruits
canned veggies
dry pasta
rice

good lil starter that will keep you fed and not bored out of your skull
breakfast could be cereals,oats and they probably selled dehydrated eggs too but they are very expensive...

good luck
 

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I agree with the "water first" statement. Yesterday's debacle in Japan where the country's tap water was contaminated is a text book reason why you need your own water storage. You can survive for 3 weeks without food...but only 3 days without water.

After that, I highly recommend you checkout this spreadsheet on how to get going on a 3-month supply of food. You're basically sitting down and selecting meals for 30 days (some can repeat but try to vary it as much as you can). Then you list each of the components of those meals...and there's your list. You'll have 3 months of the exact food you like to eat. http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net/babysteps/step-3-three-months-of-normal-food/

Don't let the pretty pink colors fool you - this is a great system.
 

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I suggest you start off with stuff that you can buy locally and eat all the time.

Personally, I like stuff like peanut butter and honey because it does not have to be kept cold.

For soups, I suggest the low sodium types.


 

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How often do you buy pizza because you worked late or are too tired to cook?

You can save a lot of money by having something in the house to heat 'n eat, such as stew or whatever. money is always a convenience!
 

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Lot's of great advice, for sure Water is #1

2) Develop a plan, you aren't going to get everything done in a day or a week or even a Month unless your wealthy and have lots of free time. Allow yourself the time to do things right and use a budget you can live with without busting you.

3) Access your needs: How many day's, weeks or Months are you planning for? How do you plan to cook, gather water and purify it? How many people are you prepping for?

4) As a part of your plan, consider a few other areas of survival:

-First aid
-Communications, radio
-Contacts: neighbors, friends, family
-Guns/ammo supplies
-Cooking
-Power if needed solar/generator etc
-Clothing as needed
-Garden/seeds
-Tools and repair kits
-Reference materials (books/how-to's)
 

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An overlooked and very important part of foods preps that most dont think about...the little ones, I see in your pic that you have a child with you BigBlzn, as do I. The stress for them in a total melt down will be immense. When I buy my preps, I sometimes take my 9yr old son with me and let him pick out a bag of suckers, gum balls, etc. That small little treat can do wonders for their moral. Dont exclude yourself from a treat once in awhile also. Remember, it isnt just about surviving, it is also about living until some sense of normalcy returns. And if is really slow to return, know how to make simple rock candy for the kids...
My 2 cents...
 

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I stock based on sale items. One week was the Knorr sides. if your not familiar with them they are rice and pasta sides that can be made in 7 minutes with just water or combined with other things to make a bigger meal. They were on sale so I grabbed one of the empty boxes and bought 12 different ones, only added like $10 to my grocery bill that pay. next pay kidney beans were on sale, bought 6 for chilli. Another pay something else was on sale so I bought a half dozen extra of those, canned ham that week. I try to do some informal meal planning and not have the same meal twice in a month so I figure those 6 items I buy are a 6 month supply. Now a SHTF situation I may have to eat something more often so that stock may go faster but it gives a general guideline. After a few months you start to get a good rotating stock and your grocery bill will gradually go down as your able to wait for sales to buy more items so you can then allocate $20 instead of $10 to preps each pay.
 

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Blessed
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An overlooked and very important part of foods preps that most dont think about...the little ones, I see in your pic that you have a child with you BigBlzn, as do I. The stress for them in a total melt down will be immense. When I buy my preps, I sometimes take my 9yr old son with me and let him pick out a bag of suckers, gum balls, etc. That small little treat can do wonders for their moral. Dont exclude yourself from a treat once in awhile also. Remember, it isnt just about surviving, it is also about living until some sense of normalcy returns. And if is really slow to return, know how to make simple rock candy for the kids...
My 2 cents...
This is so very true. I have been stocking up for the 2 grand girls that will be with us when/if TSHTF. I keep all sorts of toys, coloring books/crayons, foods that they like and both have a quilt I made for them. We are also stocking up on pull ups because in times of stress, they could revert back to babyish ways.

Suzanne
 

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I tend to think and plan in terms of having limited or even no power...

I'd like to suggest stocking up on items that will help give some variety or extra flavor to a meal. Beans and rice would get old really fast without adding some little extras...

Things like packets or cubes of bouillon/broth, canned broths, dried gravy mixes, bacon bits (glass jars have a couple year shelf life), canned cheese, taco seasoning, sloppy joe mix, etc., along with some herbs/spices (if you don't grow your own) would be good to stock up on. Pickles keep a long time after opening and are a good snack.

Various baking supplies (besides grains). Puddings, canned pie fillings, LARD (great for flatbreads etc. when oven baking isn't gonna happen), powdered milk, powdered eggs, canned butter, choc chips, and some muffin mixes have a fairly good shelf life too.

Stock up on recipes for making breads- regular baked, steamed, flat breads, or any other you can find to be able to make some no matter what your cooking situation ends up being. :)
 
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