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Nice. The recipe I have says to use a chopstick indent instead of the fork indents to make the middle rise evenly but yours seems fine. I add a tablespoon of sugar to the 2 cups of flour ,1/2 tablespoon salt and water . It makes them more edible.
 

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Looks like you did a great job with them. Did you try them yet to see if they taste to your liking? Everyone makes them a little different. I have never put any sugar in any batches that I have ever made like Exarmyguy suggested but it would be worth a try.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Haven't tried them yet, I miss read and added double the salt, so i hope it wont be to bad with all the extra salt.
 

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Haven't tried them yet, I miss read and added double the salt, so i hope it wont be to bad with all the extra salt.
You can use them in something like soup to add flavor if they are too salty to taste.
 

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I need to do this.

Can you add ingredients to increase the protein content without reducing the shelf life?

When does hardtack become a cracker, or a European type biscuit?
 

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I need to do this.

Can you add ingredients to increase the protein content without reducing the shelf life?

When does hardtack become a cracker, or a European type biscuit?
I think it would be very difficult to do so and be able to store it like you could regular hardtack. I guess you could use freeze dried TVP but that wouldn't get you much significant gain. Hardtack wasn't so much used as a main food source. It was used as a food extender much like many nations do with adding rice into all of their meals. Hardtack is really good to help with the carbohydrate and sodium intake but not a whole lot more.

Maybe someone else will be able to add some ideas on things they have added into it and worked out well?
 

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I think it would be very difficult to do so and be able to store it like you could regular hardtack. I guess you could use freeze dried TVP but that wouldn't get you much significant gain. Hardtack wasn't so much used as a main food source. It was used as a food extender much like many nations do with adding rice into all of their meals. Hardtack is really good to help with the carbohydrate and sodium intake but not a whole lot more.

Maybe someone else will be able to add some ideas on things they have added into it and worked out well?
When you start adding things it takes away the preservation factor. The simple recipe lasts pretty well forever if stored properly. Ive added sugar because that doesnt change anything and it makes them better tasting.
 

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I need to do this.

Can you add ingredients to increase the protein content without reducing the shelf life?

When does hardtack become a cracker, or a European type biscuit?
You could try an actual protein powder and see how that turns out, I would really do research on the powder before a long storage.
 

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...Can you add ingredients to increase the protein content without reducing the shelf life?
Short answer: Yep. :thumb:

..So the 'classic' recipe is typically made with just white flour, salt and water - which is fine, but we found someone's suggestion online to add-in 'Quinoa' and 'Amaranth' as a high-protein variant.. Which is, indeed, excellent.. Our 'further-twist' was to start with Corn Flour 'masa', ie: https://sep.yimg.com/ca/I/mex-grocer_2272_216749981 ..Great brand, btw.. Which gives it both more flavor and 'character'.. So.. prep goes something like this:

- 3c 'Maseca'
- 1/2c Quinoa (we really like 'Bob's Red Mill' brand..)
- 1/4c Amaranth ( " )
- 1 tsp Salt
- 2-3c water..

(..and, Obviously, the OP knows this (below) but, re-pasting this part in for others that are Not already in the 'been-there / done-that' category.. :cool:

- Pre-heat oven to 350˚; Blend all flour / grains / salt; Mix in water till you have a 'damp play-dough' consistency; Flour-dust your cutting-board, etc; Roll out to ~ 1/4 - 3/8" thick (..sure, you could go for the more 'sea biscuit' style, and roll to 1/2" th. but.. I kinda like my teeth, so.. ;) Cut into ~ 2" squares; Flour-dust your cookie sheet / baking pans (NO OIL or 'grease' of any kind, Very important!) Then, with a fork / skewer, poke alternating-pattern 'vent holes' on both sides, to prevent 'puffing' / aid in interior-cooking, etc, and Bake at 350˚ for 45 mins; Flip all HT 'cookies', Bake for another 45 mins; Cool and enjoy.

..Now, some say 'triple bake' to Really get all the moisture out, for longer term store, etc, and additionally, some have (wisely..) reminded to 'be wary of oils (inherent in the corn masa) going rancid', IF you plan to store 1yr+ but.. Our 'take on this tack' is it's SO yummy, it doesn't last that long, anyway.. :cool:

..We find this 'variant' just ends up delivering a really great 'nutty' / corn flavor, and is Excellent with even just dipping / softening it in some bone / chicken broth after a chilly day outdoors, etc.. Haven't tried it yet, but can just imagine some rabbit stew with pots, carrots and green onion, yum.. Also, try breaking it up like 'granola' / pouring on some Almond milk as a 'breakfast cereal'.. tastes almost just like 'Corn Pops'.. :D: really good..

Anyhoo, Fwiw..
jd
 

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This is the recipe I use, medieval origin

When I make it I add a little salt to make it a more 'complete' ration. Lots of carbs and protein. Lasts on the shelf for a couple years without molding it....although you indeed have to use a hammer to break it up. At that point I mix the crumbles with mild and eat like cereal.

Prince-Bisket (Hugh Platt p. 14/94): Take one pound of very fine flower, and one pound of fine sugar, and eight egges, and two spoonfuls of Rose water, and one ounce of Carroway seeds, and beat it all to batter one whole houre: for the more you beat it, the better your bread is: then bake it in coffins, of white plate, being basted with a little butter before you put in your batter, and so keep it. [end of original]

4 c flour (1 lb)

4 t caraway seeds (1 oz)

2 c sugar (1 lb)

2 t rose water

5 large eggs


Beat all ingredients together one whole hour (or do a fourth of a recipe at a time in a food processor, running it for several minutes or until the blades stall!). Spoon out onto a greased cookie sheet as 3" biscuits and bake about 20 minutes at 325deg. .

Prince-biscuit keeps forever. After the first couple of months, you may have to use a hammer to break it up into bite-sized pieces, but it still tastes good. Prince-biscuit has the additional virtue that you can get it wet, dry it out partially, and get it wet again, and it is still good (this was established at the 20-Year Celebration, when it rained seven days out of nine).
http://daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Articles/Camping without a cooler.html
 

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You could try an actual protein powder and see how that turns out, I would really do research on the powder before a long storage.
One of the amino acids in protein powders (maybe leicine?? I asked this question on a post a while back) has a relatively short shelf life, so protein powder after a while loses the complete set of aminos that people are looking for in protein powder. That does not mean that it is not useable - just means that it does not fulfil its original purpose
 

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There is a post about "potable soup",one of the links mentions adding ground meal to it.I wonder how it would be paired with hardtack?
 

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I need to do this.

Can you add ingredients to increase the protein content without reducing the shelf life?
I am guessing that anything added would reduce the shelf life somewhat. Keep in mind I am talking about the 100 year shelf life. Oatmeal has a shelf life of like 20 years if stored in Mylar so I would think the tack with oatmeal would then need to be stored in Mylar and the shelf life would become 20 years. Personally, I would rather store the oatmeal separate and use the tack as an extender. If 20 years passes without eating it, you would only have to throw out the oatmeal.
 

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looks great. Hardtack is on my to do list. Mainly as a way to preserve cheap calories and rotate out flour before it goes bad. A pound of flour gives you 1600 calories for $0.35 but only has a 6 month shelf life.
 

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looks great. Hardtack is on my to do list. Mainly as a way to preserve cheap calories and rotate out flour before it goes bad. A pound of flour gives you 1600 calories for $0.35 but only has a 6 month shelf life.
That seems low. I always thought the commonly accepted life was more like 2 years.
 

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That seems low. I always thought the commonly accepted life was more like 2 years.
Flour...6-12 months depending on humidity. 2 years in freezer 3 years in mylar with O2 absorbers. Idk if it's truly inedible or looses nutritional value.
 
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