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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been in 2 natural disasters since 1993. This has given me some extra time to prep in different categories. My driveway is 450 ft long so I can not see my front gate. We originally had one dog, 2 motion lights and a camera. So over the years we continued to add layers of protection. We now have a pack of dogs that can live for a time off the land. I have over 50 fruit trees, a supply of water and plenty of fresh critters for them to hunt if they are feeling frisky or hungry. The older dogs remind me of male lions. They let the young ones gather the food and they join in only when they are needed or if they are hungry. It doesn't matter if it's a ****, snake, apples or pears the Rotties are like Eagles. They are better at stealing then they are hunting or gathering. They are all trained with hand signals including finger snaps. To me a dog is no good if it's locked in the kennel or chained. Like a child you must nuture and love them in order to be successful in your training. Just like with friends you can not demand respect you must earn it and a dog is truely mans best friend when you have earned his love. Here are a few pics of my babies.









Chasing down a rabbit



This pic is a few years old. I only buy puppies so they can be assimilated with greater ease into the family



Here is a pic of just the old guys


Like me they love the beach and Rotties have webbed feet like Labs.





Semi retired and off duty he really is a lover.

 

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Starblaster. I used to think the same way. I have two--hundred pound German Shepherds. Had them since they were puppies. Spent a lot of time training them. They live in the house,but have there own door to the fenced yard.
The more I train and go over probable scenerios, the more I think they are the best first alert system and the best deterrent.
However, thinking from an armed predators perspective, they would be the first thing I would shoot.
Not a pleasant thought. You shoot my dogs, I will hunt down your family and kill them.
They are my family.

I would not want to wander up your driveway by mistake......

By the way, I'm just south of you in Valrico, east of Tampa.
Best wishes, to you and your impressive pack.
Kodiak
 

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My dogs are NOT part of my defense in terms of their fight ability, but they are part of my unpowered alarm system. They are remarkably alert, and often hear things LONG before we notice them. I am confident no one sneaks up on my place while they are here.
 

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Starblaster, those are some beautiful dogs; what a great asset.

I only have room for one, but she's a good one. Wish I had more room for a pack like yours -- you're very lucky to have them!
 

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I have a Boston Terrier, contrary to the notions that most terriers are yappy, she's a little ninja. Sneaky -low growl, no bark, but for an unlucky person lots of bite.
Shes turned out to be a great little natural hunter, the only thing I ever had to teach her was to drop a kill.
 

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The only problem I can see with a large pack of dogs living off the land, is some smart ass poisoning the food and thus you loose your dogs. A lot of those with well trained dogs, only allow them to feed on command, and then only from certain people, thus this stops the above scenario.

My chap is a Cairn X, his a brilliant guard dog, and a rat catcher. His job is to be within the house and my gardens (they arent big) so to protect me in any circumstance. He is allowed in all rooms for this very reason. So many have their dogs only downstairs, or sleeping in a shut up kitchen and so on, and deprives the dog from doing their jobs properly. How can a dog warn you of anything when his locked in a kitchen!

I personally would love the space, time and money to have a large pack, but I would go for a few of each guarding, terrier and other breeds, as their instincts can be pretty specific. A sight hound with a scent hound is a great team, they work differently so cover a wider range of area, then add a terrier to dig out anything, a temple dog as a warning barker.

Something else to think about for SHTF is that some dog breeds brush offs (ie fur) can be spun into wool and I have been told can be terrific sweaters and the like, acting very much like sheep wool. It is something I definately want to try in the near future and have a book on the way about that very thing.
 

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Prepare, Adapt, Survive
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Just as long as your pets don't become a liability to your survival than I'm all for it. Plus the companionship is unbeatable in a SHTF sceanario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When properties are fenced and cross fenced it eliminates many problem(poisoning) and gives the pack different patrol areas since they have access to only the area they are in. Jumping multiple fences creates more problems for the thief looking for a quick score. I feel you can never stop a professional thief or welfare bandit but if you put up enough roadblocks it will force him to look elsewehere. That and the power of pray keeps us safe.
 

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A Chihuahua or Pomeranian will flip out when hearing something 'off'. If that doesn't get you hopping, nothing will.

I used to know a homeless guy that lived in a small wooded area in the hood. He had a pack of strays. They were loyal to the core and protected him on more than one occasion.

When I was a kid growing up on the country, we had an Irish Wolfhound. 120 pds at 9 months old, 140-150 when she was full grown. We were the only house on the gravel road that was never broken into. She was beyond protective (both of people and property).

I have a 16 year old toy poodle right now on her last legs. When she could still hear, she was my alarm. Even though her hearing is gone, she would no doubt still take a bullet for me. 7 pounds of overprotective, pure ankle biting rage. :)

Dogs are great. The brave ones will protect you till the end, the scardy cats will let you know something is wrong. Either way, they just want to make you happy. Treat them right and they will do just that.
 

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Nice dogs Starblaster...

Knowing I'd be working swingshifts for some time to come I started off with Diego, far left, who begat Wolfgang via Cheyene, far right.

Sasha, pictured separately is Wolfgangs sister from a previous litter and though sometimes I question my sanity for keeping two pups, we're all rather comfortable with it and they get lots of extra goodies due to the rabbits, eggs and occasional goat by-product we raise.

As far as security, not pictured is this homely little nearsighted air raid siren named Kaiser who doesn't let anybody near the front gate and the cowbell on the gate I think helps as well.





These are all European line purebred shepherds and the grandparents on both side are all from police/military backgrounds.

We have meth-heads in these here parts of the woods but I figure most people would go to a quieter house to rip off than ours.

We also have a chihuahua named Steve who growls and rides like a wart on Wolfgang's cheek and for some strange reason Wolfgang doesn't bite Steve's little head off.


It would be hard to sneak up on our place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Boomer you have a gorgeous groups of Shepherds. I love the ears on the one on the left. The middle one is beautiful. I also understand what you mean about raising 2 puppies at the same time, it is taxing. I know I would do it again but when they are about 6 months old I was frustrated many a nights and using some phrases that had me in trouble with the Boss. One thing I learned you never mess with the boss if you would like to have a long and happy marriage. SO back out to the kennel for some more training before my honey retrained me and sent me to the doghouse. My current crop of females are all fixed so we do not have anymore unauthorized fornicating. Both my wife and I have trouble selling the pups because we want to keep them all.


Thanks for sharing your pics
 

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Our second and last litter produced ten pups. Diego, come to find out, could climb over a six foot high railing I put up on my deck as well as a line of electrified wire I put up to keep him away from Cheyenne since we didn't want puppies in the middle of winter. But we came back from shopping and found him with Cheyenne.

So we had puppies in the kitchen since that was the only linoleum we had and I blocked off the two access points with plywood to keep them in. At first when they were very little the newspaper stayed put. One morning, about 0330 we woke to the sound of much yipping and frolic. They discovered that tearing up the newspaper and sliding all over the floor was a lot of fun. And there was crap all the way around the kitchen along the cupboards, the fridge...everywhere.

So ten puppy baths later and had to blow dry them because it was December and cold outside, they went out with the other dogs for good.

My second litter was a lot harder to sell because of the economy though I did some barter for a couple of guns as well but we threw in the towel even though compared to the goats we are raising now the dogs were heaven by comparison. Hell has goats I'm pretty sure.

And am in agreement on the boss thing. I promoted my wife to Farm Manager (I need to buy her a baseball cap with that on it) so all I do is the grunt labor. The manager is on a month long trip to Wyoming with daughter so I'm wearing the hat for now.
 
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