Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Currently I am working on upgrading the bag itself, but the contents will remain the same.

Here are the contents of my BOB at the moment:

Water:
-3 Liter Camelbal
-Surplus 1 liter Canteen w/ canteen cup.
-water purification tablets
-life straw

Fire:
-Waterproof Matches, In pill bottle with cotton balls
-Magnesium Rob
-Fire Starters (x2)
-Bic Lighter

Food:
-Beef Jerky
-Cliff Bars (x2)
-Slim Jim (x2)
-Homemade Fishing Kit (Includes: Hooks of multiple size, lots of fishing line, weights, jigs, one lure
-Snares

Clothing:
-Set of clothes for the season
-Watch Cap
-Neck Warmer
-Bandanna
-Mechanix Gloves

Shelter:
-Sleeping Bag Liner
*At one point there were two different tarps, but i am trying to decide on shelter. I thought about my ENO Hammock with its rain fly and bug net... I am not sure yet.

Navigation:
-Maps of Ohio and surrounding states
-Compass
-Binoculars

Medical:
-Small medical kit
-Foot powder
-Hand Sanitizer
-ear plugs

Light:
-Flashlight/lantern combo
-Glowstick
-220 lumen tactical flashlight

Power:
-Goal Zero Solar Panel
-Battery Pack/charger

Miscellaneous:
-1 gallon Zip lock bag
-1/2 gallon zip lock bag (x2)
-Pack of zip ties
-dry bag
-100 ft of paracord
-Rite in Rain notepad
-pen, pencil, and aviator pen

Tools:
-Multi-tool
-Gerber Big Rock OR SOG Seal Pup (w/ mini survival kit i made in sheath)
-Becker Tac-Tool
-Cold Steel Trench Hawk (not as heavy as I thought it would be, but would probably be first to go)
-Gerber LMF II (on person)

Mini Survival Kit (Inside Bag itself):
-Trash Bag (x2)
-wire cutters
-wire saw
-Four bit screw driver
-CKRT Folder
-mini Mag-lite
-Another pill bottle with waterproof matches
-fire starters
-life straw
-water purification tablets
-magnessium striker
-Vitamin C drink mix
-Glow Stick
-Sharpie
-Zip ties
-Hand Sanitizer
-Petzl Head Lamp
-Needle and Thread
-100 feet of Paracord
-lip balm
-hand warmers
This mini survival pouch is a survival kit alone. It has some redundancies, but it is always good to have a back up.

Once I get my new pack and tactical quiver i will put my folding bow, arrows, broadheads, and maintenance tools in the pack.
I also have some gear on my belt and my person in general: Kershaw Emerson CQC-5k, ESEE RAT, $3 Cree Flashlight (extremely bright), Gerber Shard, wallet, Jeep keys, and Galaxy Note 3.
I am up to any suggestions or gear ideas from people. :thumb:
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,759 Posts
A good start.

I think you're light on food. You might be able to fish, might catch something with a snare, but that is very chancy stuff.

I also don't see any TP.

I don't see any socks. Foot care is paramount if you're walking. You do have powder, but extra socks so you can keep your feet dry is a must.

Something I have in my BOB is wire, 14 gauge wire. Good for repairs.

Part of these exercises is knowing what you want your BOB to do. How many days/weeks of sustainment are you expecting it to provide?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
A good start.

I think you're light on food. You might be able to fish, might catch something with a snare, but that is very chancy stuff.

I also don't see any TP.

I don't see any socks. Foot care is paramount if you're walking. You do have powder, but extra socks so you can keep your feet dry is a must.

Something I have in my BOB is wire, 14 gauge wire. Good for repairs.

Part of these exercises is knowing what you want your BOB to do. How many days/weeks of sustainment are you expecting it to provide?
Thanks!! I agree with food. Yes, TP. Extra socks are with the clothing for the season. Sorry i didn't specify that. And i love the idea of 14 gauge wire. I have a ton left over from building on my Jeep. Lastly, for the time period i have no clue yet. Where i would bug out to is not far, so I have the BOB as more reassurance and supplies when i arrive at the location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
How much does this weigh? I like your list, but I don't think I could carry that much. 40 pounds is about my limit. Thanks!
It is actually very light. I don't know the exact weight. If I don't bring the cold steel tomahawk it is perfect with lots of left over space. I would say about 25 pounds without it. Plus if I am in my car the weight will not be on me until I have to carry it.
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
17,458 Posts
Good matches even ones like the storm variety are single use. A ferro rod to go with magnesium rod will store forever and light up many fires. A magnifying glass will work for fires as well on thorns with the tweezers I didn't see in your kit. Lip balm on the cotton balls or petroleum jelly cotton balls on lips. Make sure hand sanitizer burns (enough alcohol content). The USA made Doan Mag bars with sparker work, some of the china stuff not so much. I had one go bad because it was wet in a rag for long periods of time.

Eye protection and hat. I have a boonie hat that I wove a head net into the loops. I have a beanie for use in the sleeping bag.

I over pack a lot of my stuff in Freezer Ziploc's gallon and quarts. Very handy for organization and water proofing. You can also use them for foraging instead of hand to mouth.

You can cook in a GI canteen cup. Instant rice, multigrain noodles and some spices like dehydrated onions, cayenne and some iodized salt are quick cooking belly fillers. Work well with foraged protein. You need some oil in you diet. Jar of peanut butter or my favorite coconut oil. Sealed jar(s) store well. I like my Titanium spork.

I wear a Photon light on my necklace 24/7/365. It is the older one with a switch. I'm not as fond on the new chip controlled ones, though they are better sealed and have way more features. I have a Streamlight head lamp. 3AAA green led 270 hours 2 white leds 100+ hours 1 Xenon bulb 2 hrs. Hands free is a good option.

I like my Wave with the extra bit kit. I made a regular hex bit holder so I can use my Apex brand 4,5, and 6mm hex bits in the tool. They fit my bicycle and my prosthetic leg. I have a 4" Craftsman crescent wrench with the wave. The wrench handle is wrapped with rosin core solder, very handy for metal frame eye glasses repair. Some kink of epoxy putty for all the rest.

A toothbrush and a small bottle of Dr. Bronner's peppermint soap. Pill bottle with Q-tips.

Does your compass have a mirror in the lid, works for signaling and checking for ticks on your backside. A whistle can be heard a long ways, yelling is ineffective after a short while.

Test you stuff at least in the back yard for a day or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Good matches even ones like the storm variety are single use. A ferro rod to go with magnesium rod will store forever and light up many fires. A magnifying glass will work for fires as well on thorns with the tweezers I didn't see in your kit. Lip balm on the cotton balls or petroleum jelly cotton balls on lips. Make sure hand sanitizer burns (enough alcohol content). The USA made Doan Mag bars with sparker work, some of the china stuff not so much. I had one go bad because it was wet in a rag for long periods of time.

Eye protection and hat. I have a boonie hat that I wove a head net into the loops. I have a beanie for use in the sleeping bag.

I over pack a lot of my stuff in Freezer Ziploc's gallon and quarts. Very handy for organization and water proofing. You can also use them for foraging instead of hand to mouth.

You can cook in a GI canteen cup. Instant rice, multigrain noodles and some spices like dehydrated onions, cayenne and some iodized salt are quick cooking belly fillers. Work well with foraged protein. You need some oil in you diet. Jar of peanut butter or my favorite coconut oil. Sealed jar(s) store well. I like my Titanium spork.

I wear a Photon light on my necklace 24/7/365. It is the older one with a switch. I'm not as fond on the new chip controlled ones, though they are better sealed and have way more features. I have a Streamlight head lamp. 3AAA green led 270 hours 2 white leds 100+ hours 1 Xenon bulb 2 hrs. Hands free is a good option.

I like my Wave with the extra bit kit. I made a regular hex bit holder so I can use my Apex brand 4,5, and 6mm hex bits in the tool. They fit my bicycle and my prosthetic leg. I have a 4" Craftsman crescent wrench with the wave. The wrench handle is wrapped with rosin core solder, very handy for metal frame eye glasses repair. Some kink of epoxy putty for all the rest.

A toothbrush and a small bottle of Dr. Bronner's peppermint soap. Pill bottle with Q-tips.

Does your compass have a mirror in the lid, works for signaling and checking for ticks on your backside. A whistle can be heard a long ways, yelling is ineffective after a short while.

Test you stuff at least in the back yard for a day or two.
The Mg rod is a combo with a fero rod (forgot to mention), I have tweezers in my medical kit, the cotton balls are soaked in alcohol for fire starting. I usually have sun glasses, glasses, and a hat wherever I am. I like organizing with zip locks as well. For food yes I need to add some stuff. I also have packs of tuna that are really light weight, almonds, and the other stuff listed. I like the idea of peanut butter. My newest light is an Olight S20 XML2 Baton. It is 550 lumens. I am making a hygiene kit.

I do test my gear a lot before I even think about adding it to my pack. Thanks for the info.
 

·
Hating the new Amerika.
Joined
·
2,856 Posts
A few things I would change. First, add more food. Second, I don't know if I would want to be as water dependent in a camelback. It is good to have a collapsable water system, but that appears to carry almost all of your water. It would really suck of the bladder leaked or got punctured. Just my opinion on that. Third, you have a Lifestraw which is OK, but I would recommend a Sawyer Mini filter. It is way more versatile, just as small, similar in price, easier to maintain in the field, and can filter way more water than a Lifestraw. I would also recommend that you spool about 20 to 30 feet of duct tape around a canteen or similar item. I wouldn't bet my life on a wire saw, and I think a cheap folding saw would serve you better. Aside from those minor changes, it looks ok.
 

·
Proud American Patriot
Joined
·
2,401 Posts
Depending on how big and heavy you want your bag to be (if it gets too heavy in an emergency you can always throw out some of the contents, and you won't be any worse off than if you hadn't packed them in the first place):

Nuts are very good high energy food that contain protein, carbs, and fat, the three essentials, and they keep forever. If you mix in dried fruit you have trail mix, which is even more complete. But if you mix in too much dried fruit pack plenty of TP.

A small pot to cook and boil water in. A boy scout style aluminum mess kit would be a good idea and doesn't weigh much. And I would add a spoon and fork, and a dish towel.

Soap and a cleaning pad for you mess kit.

Tooth brush. (The tooth brush by the way must have been invented in Arkansas, because if it had been invented anywhere else It'd be called a teeth brush.)

Poncho (maybe one of the small light ones you get for a few dollars in camping supply depts.). Getting soaked by rain in the wrong situation can be fatal.

Blankets are always useful.

I carry a tool box in my trunk along with my bag, and if I had to grab the bag and go because of a cataclysmic event I'd add a few things from the tool box into the bag, such as a screwdriver or two (one slot head and one phillips, with the slot head big and strong enough for prying) and 8" farmers pliers.

Folding shovel. This is one of the heaviest things listed, and might be the first to get ditched. But otherwise it can be very useful.

Can opener for long term foraging, maybe a P-38 or P-51 or one on a leatherman or Swiss Army knife.

Knife sharpener, or maybe a knife with a serrated edge that doesn't need sharpening.

Extra ammo for the gun you carry. And maybe a small cleaning kit.

Flask of 100 proof whiskey for medicinal purposes or to pass idle time or for barter.

The problem is you don't know in advance the nature of the thing you are getting away from or where you are going. There is a strong tendency of people to seek groups of people in emergencies, no matter what they might think they'll do beforehand. A government disaster preparedness manual I have recommends things like cash, which can be useful in such situations. Having a cup and spoon of your own makes it easier to eat when there is a common cooking pot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
A few things I would change. First, add more food. Second, I don't know if I would want to be as water dependent in a camelback. It is good to have a collapsable water system, but that appears to carry almost all of your water. It would really suck of the bladder leaked or got punctured. Just my opinion on that. Third, you have a Lifestraw which is OK, but I would recommend a Sawyer Mini filter. It is way more versatile, just as small, similar in price, easier to maintain in the field, and can filter way more water than a Lifestraw. I would also recommend that you spool about 20 to 30 feet of duct tape around a canteen or similar item. I wouldn't bet my life on a wire saw, and I think a cheap folding saw would serve you better. Aside from those minor changes, it looks ok.
I am adding more food and pricing out water filtration devices. And i have duct tape around pill bottles and a collapsed roll that I could put back in the bag. And i like the saw idea. I was only using the wire saw due to the weight being minimal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
I carry a tube of crazy glue. May need to use to close a wound or glue a piece of equipment back together. And yes, we do use a form of crazy glue in the ER to close wounds. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Depending on how big and heavy you want your bag to be (if it gets too heavy in an emergency you can always throw out some of the contents, and you won't be any worse off than if you hadn't packed them in the first place):

Nuts are very good high energy food that contain protein, carbs, and fat, the three essentials, and they keep forever. If you mix in dried fruit you have trail mix, which is even more complete. But if you mix in too much dried fruit pack plenty of TP.

A small pot to cook and boil water in. A boy scout style aluminum mess kit would be a good idea and doesn't weigh much. And I would add a spoon and fork, and a dish towel.

Soap and a cleaning pad for you mess kit.

Tooth brush. (The tooth brush by the way must have been invented in Arkansas, because if it had been invented anywhere else It'd be called a teeth brush.)

Poncho (maybe one of the small light ones you get for a few dollars in camping supply depts.). Getting soaked by rain in the wrong situation can be fatal.

Blankets are always useful.

I carry a tool box in my trunk along with my bag, and if I had to grab the bag and go because of a cataclysmic event I'd add a few things from the tool box into the bag, such as a screwdriver or two (one slot head and one phillips, with the slot head big and strong enough for prying) and 8" farmers pliers.

Folding shovel. This is one of the heaviest things listed, and might be the first to get ditched. But otherwise it can be very useful.

Can opener for long term foraging, maybe a P-38 or P-51 or one on a leatherman or Swiss Army knife.

Knife sharpener, or maybe a knife with a serrated edge that doesn't need sharpening.

Extra ammo for the gun you carry. And maybe a small cleaning kit.

Flask of 100 proof whiskey for medicinal purposes or to pass idle time or for barter.

The problem is you don't know in advance the nature of the thing you are getting away from or where you are going. There is a strong tendency of people to seek groups of people in emergencies, no matter what they might think they'll do beforehand. A government disaster preparedness manual I have recommends things like cash, which can be useful in such situations. Having a cup and spoon of your own makes it easier to eat when there is a common cooking pot.
I was thinking about adding nuts like the tubes of them they have at Krogers. I own a BSA mess kit and like how I can cook in it as well and if i add it the soap and other cleaning supplies will go along with it. I store tools in my vehicle as well and would add them if needed. I would like to have one of my E tools or my cold steel shovel but i agree that they are heavy. I like the can opener idea. Definitely a light weight one. My LMF II has a sharpener built into the sheath and has serrations. I would choose my gun when I bug out. It also depends on the situation. And I completely agree with you. Events are situational and I can't cover everything. Thanks for the input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I carry a tube of crazy glue. May need to use to close a wound or glue a piece of equipment back together. And yes, we do use a form of crazy glue in the ER to close wounds. :)
I understand that because crazy glue was made for wound closure originally. :D:
And I am fully aware. My whole family works in the medical field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Switch life straw for Sawyer minis more life and you can carry clean water instead of dirty. Put a tarp back in it! Need sleeping bag and get a camping pad to lay on. Just a cheapy will help.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,000 Posts
OP, awesome kit! only things I would add is two or three tubes of Glucose tablets that they sell in the pharmacies. These will give you some much needed, quick energy to keep going. Also, I would add some No-Doze/caffeine tablets.

As for shelter, I would avoid the hammock, that puts you up in full view of anyone thats walking by. My shelter for Bug Out is a USGI issue body bag for a bivy, a camo rain poncho for a low rain tarp (small and low to the ground as possible, then I scatter leaf litter over it) and a poncho liner inside the body bag for insulation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Ditch the plastic baggies and find another method of storing items. They are not waterproof and when rubbing against other gear will tear open and your bag will be a disaster.

Good that you test your gear. Many think throwing stuff in a bag is good enough. Being familiar with your gear is key.

Maybe I missed the part about a weapon and ammo? Ammo is heavy so account for that.

The only thing I can add is buy the best gear you can to add or replace items along the way. It's a good start and the more you test and tune your gear you will find what works and what doesn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Great basic BOB ... to start. And the extra posts also offer great additions to fine tune it.

Here's more:

1) include your survival weapon and ammo
2) would add a 2 man pup tent for shelter (4 lbs) and makes a big difference in the mountains or if you have weather
3) also add your 3lb sleeping bag ... strap both tent and bag to the outside of my BOB. So a good framed BOB set-up is required.
4) if you 72 hr limit is a serious target ... then jerky and candy is long gone, while you may hunt and get lucky but 3 packs of Ramen, 2 cans of Chili Beans will keep you good health and physically active.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top