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What books would you put on your must-have list? Tons of info available online, some of it actually useful too! But following murphy's law I have to assume that it would be unavailable, even if saved on local media, during a bad day.

What books would be most advised to have on hand and well read if SHTF? I currently have just the SAS survival guide thingy. Its got some nice ideas and info but I would hate to call it a definitive resource.

Edit: I guess I would clarify this by stating I'm not necessarily talking about only bushcraft, though that is certainly included. Subsistence farming or trapping to insurgent living I guess would be included?
 

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Work in progress
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A Fannie Farmer (or similar originally printed in the 1930s-1950s from before the boxed and canned foods eras). Packed with tons of information on even simple coking terms and processes, no pretty pictures just a lot of good basic information on cooking terms techniques and recipes to lear and build from.
 

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The Mom
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An almanac perhaps, and/or a gardening book with plenty of details on when/how to plant, what each plant needs in terms of food/sun/soil, etc.

Medical manual. Basic first aid, herbal treatments, common diseases, medication guide.

Sewing patterns to make clothes.

Manuals for everything you own.

Wild edibles book for your region.

Detailed trapping and fishing instruction books.

Compile a list of how-to's on your own: how to make soap from ashes, how to make sugar from beets, how to field dress game, etc.

Do you know how to cook? Look for basic cookbooks, maybe even Amish-style ones. Also look for food preservation books, and/or print out the entire nchfp.uga.edu website.

Sorry I don't have titles for ya, just ideas. Most, if not all of this info, can be printed out and saved in physical form for close to free. Multiple copies would probably be a good idea.
 

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Tested in the Wilderness
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HOLY... I've been on this site for years and never knew this was there!
Yeah, many seem to not look at top of the page for the links even to classified ads, articles, groups to join, new posts, links etc.

Here is the direct link to the books > http://www.survivalistboards.com/downloads.php

One of my favorite books is "Nuclear War Survival Skills" > www.oism.org/nwss which is more than just nuclear survival but shows how to improvise, get cheap / inexpensive food, water, shelter, etc. etc. How to build your own fallout shelter which I have done beginning more than 20 years ago. Mainly I use it as secure storage and a storm shelter.

And seemingly infinite info on google or any good search engine and here is the link to many many good survival books etc. >>> https://www.google.com.ua/search?cl...&oe=UTF-8&gfe_rd=cr&ei=6FpvWfy9DcXM8gfUi7bwBg
 

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Tested in the Wilderness
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Having now read a half-dozen books on solar PV systems, there is just one that I carry with me all day:

Off-Grid Solar: A handbook for Photovaoltaics with Lead-acid or Lithium-ion Batteries
O'Connor

Most solar books are for people trying to save money by doing grid-tie solar. This book is for us. It's short, sweet and gets you through the wonderful torture of finally understanding the alchemy of solar systems.
 

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old gunsel
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I'm partial to,
5 Acres And Independence,
Reader's Digest Back To Basics,
Successful Small Scale Farming,
And Mad, For Better Or Verse...
:eek::whip:
 

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Build The Perfect Survival Kit by John D McCann
Dare To Prepare by Holly Deyo
Emergency– This Book Could Save Your Life by Neil Strauss
Hawke’s Green Beret Survival Manual by Mykel Hawke
Making The Best Of Basics - Family Preparedness Handbook by James Talmage Stevens
Nuclear War Survival Skills by Cresson Kearny
Build The Perfect Bug Out Survival Skills by Creek Stewart
Build The Perfect Bug Out Vehicle by Creek Stewart
SAS Survival Handbook by by John "Lofty" Wiseman
SAS Urban Survival Handbook John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman
Stay Alive! Survival Skills You Need by John D McCann
The Disaster Preparedness Handbook 2nd Edition by Dr. Arthur T. Bradley
When All Hell Breaks Loose by Cody Lundin
When Technology Fails by Matthew Stein
Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks
Storey’s Basic Country Skills by John & Martha Storey
The Back To Basics Handbook by Abigail R. Gehring
The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
The Guide To Self-Sufficiency by John Seymour
Ditch Medicine by Hugh L Coffee
Gardening When It Counts by Steve Solomon
Humanure Handbook by Joseph Jenkins
Shelters, Shacks, and Shanties by D. C. Beard
Survival and Austere Medicine by TRAWATWMDBM
The Complete Book of Underground Houses by Rob Roy
Where There Is No Dentist by Murry ****son
Where There Is No Doctor by David Werner
Where Women Have No Doctor

Just my opinion.
 

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BOOKSHELF SUGGESTIONS – MEDICAL

Pre-crash there are those who want alternatives to the present predominate pharmaceutical centered medical treatment. In a localized short term disaster such medical care may be temporarily interrupted. In a widespread long term crisis such medical care may be unavailable indefinitely.
For those who can get basic training in first aid, CPR, etc., please consider doing so.
For the time being, versions, excerpts, or summaries of the following books may be available online, but without the internet and electricity, such files will be of little use. We have a lot of electronic files, these books are among the ones we consider key and needed to have a hard copy on our shelves.
Overall, consider as a crash planning goal minimization of how far we fall. We have accepted used books can flesh out our library.
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Prescription for Natural Cures (3rd edition), by Mark Stengler (NMD), James F. Balch (MD), and Robin Young Balch (ND)
Prescription for Herbal Healing, by Phyllis A. Balch (CNC)
Prescription for Nutritional Healing, by Phyllis A. Balch (CNC)
Tools to look up an illness and obtain information on potentially helpful herbs, foods, essential oils, etc., as well as those to avoid.
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Where There is No Doctor, by David Werner
Where There is No Dentist, by Murray ****son
These two books, along with a variety of other primitive situation titles are available free to download at: http://hesperian.org/books-and-resources/
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Ditch Medicine, Advanced Field Procedures for Emergencies, by Hugh L. Coffee
The focus of this book is on wound treatment.
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Gray’s Anatomy
Merk’s Manual of Medical Information
Emergency War Surgery, NATO Handbook
Well beyond “first aid”, but in a prolonged situation it may be useful reading for an appropriately qualified person.
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Nutrition Almanac (3rd edition), by Nutrition Search, Inc.
We are in Arizona. Suggest obtaining the appropriate plants guides for your area and learning to locate and recognize your resources.

Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West, by Gregory L. Tilford
Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West, Michael Moore
Herbal Medicine of the American Southwest, The Definitive Guide, by Charles W. Kane
A Field Guide to the Plants of Arizona, by Anne Orth Epple
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PDR (Physicians’ Desk Reference) for Herbal Medicines
The PDR (Physicians’ Desk Reference) Pocket Guide to Prescription Drugs
Post crash, it could be valuable to know the use of whatever commercial drug resources remain.
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A Barefoor Doctor’s Manual, A Guide to Traditional Chinese and Modern Medicine, by The Revolutionary Health Committee of Hunan Province

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BOOKSHELF SUGGESTIONS TECHNOLOGY

GENERAL –
Dare to Prepare, by Holly Drennan Deyo
An excellent reference for starting as well as more experienced “preppers”. Comments posted on Amazon include “…This is the total package of emergency preparedness bound in a book that should be in every household. So many different scenarios of potential disasters are covered in these pages. The book is filled with information that would take any individual years worth of time scouring the internet and libraries to find. Holly has put it all into a well-organized book that you can easily have at your fingertips when the electricity is out or the internet is down. This is a very realistic and practical book everyone needs to own…”
If you are in Tucson and want one, see Mr. Luke King at one of his preparedness classes. For information on the classes check the Southern Arizona Prepper meetup site:
https://www.meetup.com/Southern-Arizona-Preppers/
Mr. King buys them in volume from the author and sells them at cost, getting you a new book at a cost lower than the used ones on Amazon.

When Technology Fails, A Manual for Self-Reliance & Planetary Survival, by Matthew Stein
Wagner’s Chemical Technology 1872, by Rudolf Wagner, translated by William Crookes
How To Recycle Scrap Metal Into Electricity, Handbook for the New Alternative Energy, by John N. Hait
Pedal Power In Work, Leisure, and Transportation, edited by James C. McCullagh
Solar Alcohol, The Fuel Revolution, America Can Be Energy Self-Sufficient, by Michael Wells Mandeville
Producing Your Own Power, How to Make Nature’s Energy Sources Work For You, edited by Carol Hupping Stoner
Back to Basics, How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills, by Reader’s Digest
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DEFENSE -
Nuclear War Survival Skills, by Cresson H. Kearny
The Anarchist Cookbook, by William Powell
The Poor Man’s James Bond, Volume 1, by Kurt Saxon
The Poor Man’s James Bond, Volume 2
Maintenance manuals for whatever firearms you have selected. A site with many manuals is:
http://www.stevespages.com/page7b.htm
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PLANTS – GROWING & GATHERING
One Circle, How to Grow a Complete Diet in Less Than 1000 Square Feet, by David Duhon
Future Fertility, Transforming Human Waste Into Human Wealth, by John Beeby
Secrets to Great Soil, A Growers Guide to Composting, Mulching, and Creating Healthy, Fertile Soil for Your Garden and Lawn, by Elizabeth P. Stell
Gardening for Maximum Nutrition, Easy ways to double the nutritional value of your backyard garden, by Jerry Minnich
A sample use would be the ability to select a crop based on your desire to increase some particular “vitamin” in your diet. The top recommended plant is Amaranth.
Carrots Love Tomatoes, Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening, by Louise Riotte
There are plant combinations which do much better together, and those which just cannot stand each other.
How to Grow Fresh Air, 50 Houseplants that Purify Your Home or Office, by Dr. B.C. Wolverton
Many household products and construction materials release fumes, mixed with structures sealed for energy efficiency and the indoor air can be MUCH worse that outdoors. If you know the gas you need to address, you can probably find the right plant to help remove it from your air.
A Field Guide to the Plants of Arizona, by Anne Orth Epple
Color photographs, vs the sketches in so many plant ID books, helps, but I still wish I could encounter a wild plant expect to train under.
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BROAD CONCEPTS -
The Cartoon Guide to Physics, by Larry Gonick & Art Huffman
The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry, by Larry Gonick & Craig Criddle
The Cartoon Guide to Genetics, by Larry Gonick & Mark Wheelis
 

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A number of good ones are already listed and there are a few i might check out myself, but one I didn't see listed is Wildwood Wisdom by Ellsworth Jaeger. Its bushcraft not survival, but is full of a lot of ideas that will work in a survival situation long or short.
 

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Build The Perfect Survival Kit by John D McCann
Dare To Prepare by Holly Deyo
Emergency– This Book Could Save Your Life by Neil Strauss
Hawke’s Green Beret Survival Manual by Mykel Hawke
Making The Best Of Basics - Family Preparedness Handbook by James Talmage Stevens
Nuclear War Survival Skills by Cresson Kearny
Build The Perfect Bug Out Survival Skills by Creek Stewart
Build The Perfect Bug Out Vehicle by Creek Stewart
SAS Survival Handbook by by John "Lofty" Wiseman
SAS Urban Survival Handbook John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman
Stay Alive! Survival Skills You Need by John D McCann
The Disaster Preparedness Handbook 2nd Edition by Dr. Arthur T. Bradley
When All Hell Breaks Loose by Cody Lundin
When Technology Fails by Matthew Stein
Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks
Storey’s Basic Country Skills by John & Martha Storey
The Back To Basics Handbook by Abigail R. Gehring
The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
The Guide To Self-Sufficiency by John Seymour
Ditch Medicine by Hugh L Coffee
Gardening When It Counts by Steve Solomon
Humanure Handbook by Joseph Jenkins
Shelters, Shacks, and Shanties by D. C. Beard
Survival and Austere Medicine by TRAWATWMDBM
The Complete Book of Underground Houses by Rob Roy
Where There Is No Dentist by Murry ****son
Where There Is No Doctor by David Werner
Where Women Have No Doctor

Just my opinion.
Did you break into my cabin library. I only see one book you listed I dont have.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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But following murphy's law I have to assume that it would be unavailable, even if saved on local media, during a bad day.
A couple old Android tablets, a couple Goal Zero panels, several 32G MicroSD cards, several portable hard drives, several rapid charge devices, a handful of 32G jump drives, two rooted low power tablet readers, and all of that stashed in a couple different types of Faraday containments all serve one purpose.

To house over a dozen copies of 30 gigs of electronic survival knowledge. Almost ten thousand books, manuals, white papers, blueprints, etc. If you look into the SB download section and see all we have here, that would barely scratch the surface of what I have. Helicopter and light plane operator training manuals, late issue surgical texts, machine blueprints of just about every large production small arm, training manuals for just about every blue collar trade and skill, an entire scientific library, every useful US military manual, pioneering and bushcraft texts from over a century ago to up to present day, crazy amounts of homesteading and food growing material, hundreds of Peace Corps type manuals for low tech better living in 3rd world nations, everything you need to educate a child from K-12 and then the basics for 2 year community college degrees in useful degrees, hunting/shooting/foraging/trapping/fishing guides by the scores, and this goes on and on.

I have more emergency info than a person can realistically read in a lifetime unless you made it your life's work.

What I'm saying is if you take your concerns to heart about the loss risk of electronic data and build in a lot of redundancy then you can compile absolutely all the kinds of survival info you could ever imagine. Nothing I did was especially hard or expensive. Tedious, very much so. It's taken me quite a number of years to get to this level of electronic survival ability. Yet what I did only takes a modest bit of small electronics savvy, far less money than you might think (maybe $300 spent over a decade), and the willingness to see it through.

See your worries as a challenge instead. Make an electronic survival library that is easy to use and basically bombproof (including EMP nukes). You simply cannot pile up enough physical books to begin to rival what you can do with electronics. You could fill a spare bedroom with shelves and never get a tenth in there that I can put in my pants cargo pocket.

Sure, buy some good physical books. I'm no electronics snob in this matter. I have several ceiling height shelves filled with good SHTF books, plus mountains of science/engineering/medical texts from all my years of education. But if I have to run out the door then I can grab something the size of a small box of crackers and have enough info to rebuild an entire community and then some.

Don't discard one medium for the other. Embrace both types.
 

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If you live in the northern forests, the book to get is Hunters of the Northern Forest written by anthropologist Richard Nelson who lived with the Kutchin natives and documented how they subsisted and thrived. Very well documented book on how they hunted, fished, trapped and gathered. Lots of good information on animal behavior and uses of plants. It's a fascinating book about a native subsistence lifestyle that's pretty much gone today, along with the knowledge of a culture that once thrived in the northern forest for countless generations. It's not a sexy as books about surviving the zombie apocalypse, and it's written as you would expect an anthropologist to write a book. Detailed, factual, illustrations, lists, etc.
 
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Did you break into my cabin library. I only see one book you listed I dont have.
lol

Those are just the 'must haves'.

I have several hundred other paper books, and over 26,000 Kindle/e-books and .pdfs, almost all of which I got for free, and well over half are directly related to prepping, with another quarter plus being 'rebuilding-of-civilization' books on every subject I can think of that I have found a free book to address. The rest are fiction or entertaining non-fiction, as I believe they do actually have a place in rebuilding civilization.

The electronic libraries are backed up and I have several means to access them in Faraday cages, with equipment to power them, also in protection.

Just my opinion.
 
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