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Watchful and Hopeful
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been considering the possibly ill effects for those connected to a municipal sewage line that leads to a treatment facility. In the case this facility fails in a post SHTF situation I would think the sewage would slowly begin to back up and eventually come back into your toilets, sinks and tubs.
It is one thing to deal with the waste of you and you closest. It is another to have the rest of the neihborhood's flow into your home.

Is this a legit concern?
Has anyone set up such to disconnect themselves from the treatment grid?
Any ideas on how to complete such a project?

I am just thinking outloud hear. BTW..I am a newb here and this is my first post. I did a search and did not find anything in regards to this topic. Forgive me if this is a double.
 

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Sewer back flow device?

I am a certified back flow device tester in MS. Not sure if I have ever seen a device for a sewer line. Potable water back flow devices depend on water pressure to work and they require clean water. They wouldn't work on a gravity sewer line from the house.
The simplest and most cost effective method would be to get a butterfly valve. Butterfly valves are a lot cheaper than gate valves, but not as durable. Install it in your section of the sewer line. This would allow to close it in the event of a problem.
 

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357 Mag, sex for the hand
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find YOUR sewer service line and install a back flow preventer.

That will stop back flow and yes your original premise about the main backing up was correct

A backflow wouldnt matter, if the main sewer line gets that backed up it will close the flapper, then all your sewage will get caught behind the flapper and still flow back through your house.

Get a secondary septic tank install a Y fitting at your sewer service and use a butterfly valve on both your public service and your septic service. So if your public service backs up you just have to close that valve and open the other.

On another note, if sewer ever gets that backed up, Id expect it to boil out sewer manholes first, since most houses sit above sewer manholes gravity takes effect.
 

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Watchful and Hopeful
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info guys. Currently both of my locations have a septic system, however my business is on the municipal sewer line. I had possed this thought should I find myself in that situation, and to bring up the topic should others find there self in the same situation. I just wasn't sure if this could be a real issue or not in that situation

Thanks again!
 

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I am on top a mountain too!

my only concern is sewer roaches being able to climb up into the house through the dry system... assuming there is no public water running.

I was at a class run buy the LDS and they showed how they put a tennis ball in a sock and shoved it down into the toilet to keep smells and bugs from climbing up.

Is this something I should also worry about?
 

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one day at a time
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Great Post. Welcome.

How like ly would it be to beable to put a butterfly valve in the sewer line? Or are you speacking more internal? Then would you have to check codes to see if this is allowed?

I belive it would go back up in to the streets first. Yet let us not forget Katrina. Also I had a friend in N.J. who was on vacation it flooded up there his basement toilet backed up 3' of excrament in his basement! From the sewer backing up. So lower levels will be affected first.

The sock thing; I dont know enough presser may launch it back out. Then if it gets stuck....
 

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Knocked Down But Up Again
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I have a water treatment plant literally behind my house. I guess I'm pretty much screwed in this kind of event since I'm planning on bugging in.
 

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Knocked Down But Up Again
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I have to stay here in the city. I have elderly in-laws that I have to take care of and they won't leave their home. Like I said, I'm stuck.
 

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This all depends on your where your house sits in regard to the treatment plant. If it is just the sewage, not ton's of rain, it will still flow down to the treatment plant. That area will be overflowing, but if you are uphill from it, you will be fine. In many large towns thou, they use lift stations, to keep everything going down hill. If you live in a area that needs a lift station, then it will back up.

When I worked for the plumber, we did install HD butterfly valves in the main line from the house that would keep the main sewer overflow from coming back your pipe and flooding your house. But that gets expensive fast if you can't do it yourself.

Call the water dept and ask about flooding. A supervisor there could tell you what works in the area, and if you need it at all.
 

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High on a mountain top
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Probably won't be a huge issue unless you are below other houses on your street and the manhole covers. In SHTF situation, fresh water systems will break FAR before sewer / storm water systems - fresh water requires many pumps filters etc to keep it running - when there is no fresh water there won't be much going down the sewer... I've lived through 3 sewer backups in a previous house and installed sewer backup system.

If you're worried it is possible to look at sewer and water line maps at your local municipality and some even have free web-based online mapping which will show locations and elevations of these pipes coming from / going to your house. I used this information to help pick my current house as I didn't want to deal with any more backup issues... It is important to have a nice grade away from your house, and ideally no or not too many houses above you on the same line (as a block just below your connection would cause sewage from houses above you to backup into your basement if you're the next lowest point) Hope that makes sense to people.

Also might be a good time to mention people should be very careful when storing preps in basements flooding caused by rainwater is really common problem, not to mention leaking hot water tanks etc. so make sure you preps are water and bug proof!
 
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