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I remember when this was going on. There are a lot of questions that still have not been answered by public health officials - such as the Center of Disease Control (CDC). When the outbreak was going on, the CDC website had almost no information about what was going on. It seemed strange that the nations largest public health organization said almost nothing when the nations largest outbreak of a disease was going on.

A lot of people in the local health related community turned a blind eye to it. When I asked one lady who works in the immunizations department why the vaccine failed to protect against an outbreak, she did not have an answer.

Public health officials seemed mute on the topic, which worried me then and still worries me today.

While doing some research while the mumps outbreak was going on I found out some information.

  • When a group of people are given a vaccine, only about 75% will develop any resistance to the disease.
  • Resistance does not equal immunity.
  • When immunizations rates fall below 50% of a given population, random outbreaks can occur.
  • Resistance induced by a vaccine is only good for a short period of time.

In my opinion, vaccines can be good for a population in the prevention of disease. My complaint is that the public is not being told the whole truth about vaccines and how effective they are.

Part of my full time job deals with health related issues. I can have seen cases of chicken pox even after the child has had their full dose of the chicken pox (varicella) vaccine. One case was from a girl who had played with a child that had early signs of chicken pox. One case was from vaccine induced infection. Meaning the person developed a full chicken pox infection from the vaccine.

Vaccines can help control the spread of disease, but are no replacement for good hygiene and infection control measures.

Each person should do their part to prevent the spread of disease by washing their hands and covering their cough. If a family member is sick, they should be quarantined.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080410/ap_on_he_me/mumps_vaccine;_ylt=Al0xM1dhtKuiP3qS9elmvHXVJRIF
Most of the college students who got the mumps in a big outbreak in 2006 had received the recommended two vaccine shots, according to a study that raises questions about whether a new vaccine or another booster shot is needed. The outbreak was the biggest in the U.S. since shortly before states began requiring a second shot for youngsters in 1990.

Nearly 6,600 people became sick with the mumps, mostly in eight Midwest states, and the hardest-hit group was college students ages 18 to 24. Of those in that group who knew whether they had been vaccinated, 84 percent had had two mumps shots, according to the study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments.

In the last sentence of the quote, the word immunity is being used. Just because a person receives a vaccine does not mean they are 100% immune to the disease. But the article implies that is fact.

That "two-dose vaccine failure" startled public health experts, who hadn't expected immunity to wane so soon — if at all.
 

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IMO the only people who should be getting mumps injections should be adults who've never caught it.

You don't want to catch mumps as an adult man, unless you like carrying your testicles around in a wheelbarrow.:eek:

Children should be encouraged to catch stuff like that when they're young.
Not pleasant at all but it's good for your immune system.
 

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75% rate of success? Imagine having ammo that 1 in 4 was a dud.Imagine 1 in 4 of your tires,blowing out at speed.Imagine 1 in 4 parachutes failing to deply on a jump.
 

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So, does all this mean that those of us who were vaccinated (for mumps) as children should get re-vaccinated now that we're adults (in our 30's)? I had the chicken pox when I was 8, but I was vaccinated for measles and mumps. Would it be dangerous as an adult to catch it, like the chicken pox is more dangerous if you catch it as an adult?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, does all this mean that those of us who were vaccinated (for mumps) as children should get re-vaccinated now that we're adults (in our 30's)? I had the chicken pox when I was 8, but I was vaccinated for measles and mumps. Would it be dangerous as an adult to catch it, like the chicken pox is more dangerous if you catch it as an adult?
I put together a little article - http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=10778

The longer its been since your immunization shot, the lower the resistance.
 

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Shuriken snowflake
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I'm not sure why people get so many shots for things that are normally not dangerous, just a hassle. I can see a big gain in trying to rid of the real baddies like TB and polio, that's all. Coughing in your hand should be avoided since colds and flus are spread by droplets, you cough then touch something and then someone else touches it. I agree though, to basic hygiene. Also nowadays people seem so selfish. They go to work sick because they don't want to lose money. When I was young you were taught to stay home for the sakes of others but I guess people are too stressed for that.
 

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"Dolt"
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I have two points in my opinion.

First vaccines should be limited based on need or probable contact. For example health care providers should be vaccinated due to high likelihood of contract, “epidemic” outbreaks or pandemics would be another reason.

My second point, vaccines normally work against one strain of a virus, while there might be several strains in the open. For example, the chicken pox vaccine protects against one strain but there may seven or more strains it does not protect against. This is one reason (not the only reason) people catch chicken pox twice in a life time.
 

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Fortes Fortuna Juvat
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I appreciate your efforts to provide information.

I only have personal experience thus bias to offer.
I do not like vaccines, at all.

There is however a "risk outweighing the benefits" consideration. I would have been a fool to go to Africa , Thailand other countries, without the full contingent of shots.

I also believe that I was correct in NOT blindly immunizing my seven children.
All seven are shot free and they have been taught that once their reproductive systems are up and running and they want to travel abroad, that it would benefit them to receive them.


On my mothers side of the family, we had three out of 15 infants die within 72 hours of their shots at ages ranging from 2-9 months. That was reason enough for me to choose NOT to immunize my children.

The "Big Picture" side of my brain says that, nature is going to balance population NO Matter What We Do to Avoid disease.
 

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Shuriken snowflake
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Here there is some twofaced information. They say the TB vaccine is completely safe. Yet they don't want to give it to infants like they used to. Even if its safe. So they only give it to risk group people meaning immigrants or children to infected people. I only know two infants that got the vaccine. Both died from SIDS.
 
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