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I was a late comer to the whole battle belt and rigs thing.

Eventually I decided I needed to be serious about what I was doing and not just continue using "good enough" alternatives that I already had on hand.

I bought one of the Condor outer and inner belts with suspenders, loved it, bought several. Then I found out about a chest rig and, never having tried one, I got one and liked it. Ended up buying another.

For me, here in Canada AR platforms are more expensive than for you Americans, and now they are flat out unavailable. At the time I was looking at options, SHTF and otherwise, I was looking at PPC, Shotgun, and eventually a battle rifle (the one I planned on is no longer available in Canada either).

I quickly generated multiple rigs based around different plans of action and different weapons. I mean, full action response post WROL is different than "something went bump in my yard".

I ended up with one Full Battle one designed around a Battle Rifle I do not have at present...Canuckistan sucks for gun owners BTW.

I have one that is built around shotgun and pistol with a large group/SHTF/riot bent. If I get the rural property I am looking at, I will be making a variant of this for patrols of the property.

I have one that is built around PPC and pistol with a security/patrolling bent.

I have one that is built around long range rifle and pistol, for longer range engagements and animals of all sorts, but it is still very much a work in progress and not ready for prime time yet.

I have a bare bones battle belt which is more a "bump in the night, might be a raccoon" bent.Just a pistol for that.


I also like to have different rigs in different locations so that something is always quick and easy on hand. I look at them basically like BOBs and the like; you never know what door you might need to go out... Add to that I like to have multiples in case I end up having to equip an ally or MAG member.
 

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I hope you boys are physically fit enough to run/job/walk long distances with all that gear. Real combat is no video game. ;)

Not saying all of you aren't capable, but many aren't or have much need of improvement in the cardio realm (myself included as I still concentrate too much on strength training). Part of my plan will be long hikes with weights or maybe something special to help simulate gear.
 

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I hope you boys are physically fit enough to run/job/walk long distances with all that gear. Real combat is no video game. ;)

Not saying all of you aren't capable, but many aren't or have much need of improvement in the cardio realm (myself included as I still concentrate too much on strength training). Part of my plan will be long hikes with weights or maybe something special to help simulate gear.
I am, right now, working on that very problem.

Too many years of sedentary jobs and eating junk combined with not enough exercise.

I have lost around 50lbs in the past two years (not including muscle I have been putting back on) and still doing so. Trying to get stronger and generally more fit since I don't have any major health problems (high BP, high cholesterol, heart disease etc) yet and would prefer to keep it that way.

That is a huge part of why I am looking to get some land. Not only will I be working that land, and building projects etc, but I will be eating and living healthier. It will also be a lifestyle that by definition will help me get into shape and stay there.
 

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I am, right now, working on that very problem.

Too many years of sedentary jobs and eating junk combined with not enough exercise.

I have lost around 50lbs in the past two years (not including muscle I have been putting back on) and still doing so. Trying to get stronger and generally more fit since I don't have any major health problems (high BP, high cholesterol, heart disease etc) yet and would prefer to keep it that way.

That is a huge part of why I am looking to get some land. Not only will I be working that land, and building projects etc, but I will be eating and living healthier. It will also be a lifestyle that by definition will help me get into shape and stay there.
Great fitness and combat preparedness must be a LIFESTYLE, not a roller coaster. (y)
 

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I am, right now, working on that very problem.

Too many years of sedentary jobs and eating junk combined with not enough exercise.

I have lost around 50lbs in the past two years (not including muscle I have been putting back on) and still doing so. Trying to get stronger and generally more fit since I don't have any major health problems (high BP, high cholesterol, heart disease etc) yet and would prefer to keep it that way.

That is a huge part of why I am looking to get some land. Not only will I be working that land, and building projects etc, but I will be eating and living healthier. It will also be a lifestyle that by definition will help me get into shape and stay there.
Having your own land is the ultimate statement of Freedom. My parents had a huge farm about an hour from the city when I was a kid, but sold it by the time I was a teenager. My dad had plenty of farm life growing up and was done with it, although I missed having that weekend escape to the country right away and still miss it. And I miss the old 100+ year old farm house, which also doubled as a hunting lodge complete with antique cast iron wood burning stove. And I miss the sound of rain on that tin roof.

:confused:

One of my primary life goals is to establish another country estate for my family and future generations to inhabit, including building a grand country house with a reinforced bunker. Liberals absolutely HATE the idea of independent, free-thinking Americans wanting to live far away from their cesspool cities. I can't wait to get far away from them. Maybe more than just an hour away. (y)
 

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Having your own land is the ultimate statement of Freedom. My parents had a huge farm about an hour from the city when I was a kid, but sold it by the time I was a teenager. My dad had plenty of farm life growing up and was done with it, although I missed having that weekend escape to the country right away and still miss it. And I miss the old 100+ year old farm house, which also doubled as a hunting lodge complete with antique cast iron wood burning stove. And I miss the sound of rain on that tin roof.

:confused:

One of my primary life goals is to establish another country estate for my family and future generations to inhabit, including building a grand country house with a reinforced bunker. Liberals absolutely HATE the idea of independent, free-thinking Americans wanting to live far away from their cesspool cities. I can't wait to get far away from them. Maybe more than just an hour away. (y)
Well, I consider myself a blend of what you guys call conservative and liberal. My personal policies are a clear mixture of both. I consider myself religious, but also have little issue with "alternative lifestyles"...live and let live I say. I am ardently pro-gun but believe in regulation of such (for example, I am totally fine with background checks, special licenses for full auto and such as long as people can actually get those licenses. Here in Canuckistan, carry is a pipe dream, 20rd rifle mags are more fantasy than Lord of the Rings, and I am more likely to meet Santa than I am to own a concealable firearm). I am all for social programs, but also believe in getting government out of our lives in almost every way. I am all for our socialized medicine, but want reforms. Want more green energy, but also want infrastructure to become a priority. All for elimination of tax loopholes that let the wealthy pay less than their secretary, but also don't want government regulating every nut and bolt. I am university educated, but don't use that as a measure of how smart a person is.

Guess I am a libertarian?

But as such, I far from hate the idea of independent, free thinking people living away from cities. I fully support it. It is, after all, my dream too.
 
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I can see where it may be useful, but I was never in special forces... just big army. One set up for everything.
Every time you go out, you stuff is always in the same spot. You can find anything in the dark, and so can anyone on your team.
Now that I'm old as dirt, and a retired cripple... this works out well for me. I can't remember **** these days... lol.

I got one set up. Besides, I'm kinda poor, (OK, lower middle class, but you know how we Americans like to complain) living on VA disability, got a kid in college, building a Jeep in the garage, house is 123 years old...
 

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I can see where it may be useful, but I was never in special forces... just big army. One set up for everything.
Every time you go out, you stuff is always in the same spot. You can find anything in the dark, and so can anyone on your team.
Now that I'm old as dirt, and a retired cripple... this works out well for me. I can't remember **** these days... lol.

I got one set up. Besides, I'm kinda poor, (OK, lower middle class, but you know how we Americans like to complain) living on VA disability, got a kid in college, building a Jeep in the garage, house is 123 years old...
First off thank you for your service and I understand what you are saying on the one setup for anything in which I would do if something went down but I would like opinions if at all.i haven't served and trying act like it but I have taken training classes for my self and so if something happens I am some what able to protect myself
 

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daddyusmaximus: One set up for everything. Every time you go out, you stuff is always in the same spot. You can find anything in the dark, and so can anyone on your team.
This was pretty much my model in actual practice. In an evolutionary fashion, I changed rigs, pouches, and specific layouts over the years... in response to changes in radios, weaponry, armor, environment... but my base rig, once tailored, pretty much stayed the same. Reloads here, compass there, everything arranged just so. I wore most everything you can think of professionally from 1977 until 2012. Army 11 (Infantry) & 18 (SF) Series MOS.

For instance, my ALICE LBE (worn on the job from mid-70s until early 2000s) fundamentally never changed. No matter the unit of assignment or location in the world, I ran essentially the same layout & pouches on that rig. With the occasional addition/deletion of things like a bayonet, aircrew survival radio, or satcom radio pouches. Everything in its place, everything rapidly accessible by flight gloved hands, through long years of practice, day or night. Same applied when I wore assault vests or chest rigs. Or full body armor chassis. Very little actually changed in terms of loadout or placement. I never had to think about where something was. Or where certain items were on my buddy's rig (SOI, morphine, tourniquet, etc.)

When the GWOT took us into an age of full time plate armor wear, my pouched-up armor rig changed little once I had it arranged to my liking. Same basic setup employed from my first down range tours to my last. Again, with occasional minor pouch swaps to handle specific pieces of gear or munitions for a particular mission.

I rarely swapped from one type of load bearing gear to another. Just made my current chosen rig do it all. The same rig was worn whether I was on a movement to contact patrol, a road convoy, a foot reconnaissance, a night airborne infiltration, conducting military skiing/snowshoeing, occupying an ambush, pulling guard duty, surface swimming onto a beach landing site, or doing long distance evasion corridor movement. Once you get your baseline gear/load sorted out... and precisely fit & adjusted to your build... it's like a second skin. You should be able to handle 95% of tasks with it.

The only time I can recall abruptly changing up rigs in mid-stream was in early Afghanistan (OEF I). I went from my initial wear of long cherished ALICE LBE & Safariland 6004 thigh rig... to adopting a Chicom canvas AK chest pouch and low ride belt mounted holster. For reasons that made sense in that time and place. Much easier to blend in among the locals while wearing indigenous clothing. Even then, I kept that LBE set as a handy second load of ammo in vehicles, aircraft, fighting bunkers, or sleeping quarters (a "Go Bag" with a harness... that I could run with).

Sometimes you have to use a different rig or a very modified one. Often in response to going to a particular weapon system. I carried an M203 for much of my career, so my load bearing vest/pouches were setup for carrying 40mm. Likewise during the years when I was issued an AKMS rifle... I had a custom assault vest sewn up for AK magazines. Sometimes you get designated to carry a belt fed for a particular mission and need to temporarily reconfigure pouches for machine gun ammo.

A legitimate scenario I see for wildly divergent rigs is when you need to go low profile (concealing worn gear while wearing civilian clothing or doing a lot of routine driving in sedans, SUVs, etc.). Usually a small chest rig full of long gun ammo, a gunbelt, and/or armor worn under cover garments. For that, there is something to be said for owning a very lo-pro minimalist rig that offers ultra-flat profile and minimal printing. Rifle CCW as it were.

Another scenario for an optional light rig is when you are inside your own defensive umbrella. "Inside the wire". Maybe securely inside your own home or property line defenses. In a semi-permissive to non-permissive environment. You aren't expecting specific trouble or attack, but it is accepted that such things are possible/likely. Current events recommending having more than just a pistol handy.

Things being dangerous enough that you want to be armed with a long gun at all times (on your person, within arms reach, or within two steps). But you don't want to spend every waking minute walking around with 25-40 lbs of battle rattle draped across your body. So... you go with a battle belt and/or a very minimal chest rig or plate carrier setup. You have immediate access to a few reloads for the long gun that accompanies you for everyday tasks. Enough that you can return fire and then move to cover and don your parked/grounded main loadout gear.

A really big discriminator for owning more than one rig is your decision to wear (or not wear) armor. If no armor is worn, just about any load bearing rig will work. If you choose to wear armor, you have to start evolving your load to mate to that armor. Whether attached directly to it... or worn on a separate vest/chest rig designed to drape and ride securely over the armor rig. Which usually means that a second load bearing rig is convenient for those times where no armor is worn. Because if all your pouches are physically attached to the armor carrier... you can't instantly strip down weight/bulk except by taking the entire rig off.

Alternatively, in the case of a separate vest for pouches (like an FLC), the load bearing rig is usually sized to fit over the armor... and is too loose on your body without that armor being worn. There are times and places where armor is not advised. You still need to be able to carry water, trauma medical kit, navigation/signal aids, & ammo. So you might want another rig, sized for your unarmored body. Because routinely re-sizing a rig to fit an armored/unarmored body is a pain in the ass.

You'll notice that what I've written above sounds contradictory. On one hand, I tended to work with just one rig at a time in real life. On the other hand, it can be handy to have a backup or special purpose rig. Whether to support a special weapon, to support discrete grey man travel, or to simply have options to fit your armored vs unarmored body.

It's kinda like owning different vehicles for different purposes. Or different guns. You might own several examples of each, but you'll tend to use one vehicle for your daily driver. Or one primary handgun for CCW. The others are useful options. But your main choice gets employed for most everyday tasks. Which is why I agree with daddyusmaximus about focusing on ONE rig that'll handle most tasks. The one your training and muscle memory is centered on.

BTW: My unarmored load carriage option is still an old ALICE nylon LCE, pretty much set up the same way it was when I was in service. It works today as well as it ever did... offering all the real estate I need, quick don/doff, an ability to get prone, quick drying ventilation, lots of adjustability for body size/height, water resistance, bomb proof carriage of dozens of pounds, and 4-season / all-terrain durability. For not a lot of money. It's the Glock of load bearing rigs.
 

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I hope you boys are physically fit enough to run/job/walk long distances with all that gear. Real combat is no video game. ;)
Not saying all of you aren't capable, but many aren't or have much need of improvement in the cardio realm (myself included as I still concentrate too much on strength training). Part of my plan will be long hikes with weights or maybe something special to help simulate gear.
This is no joke. I've taken more than few classes where the HSLD-looking guys would don their plate carrier kit and in about 20-30 minutes, it would come off. It's not so much just cardio. I've found I need to really focus on lower body with weight training and core exercises; I still do distance backpacking (50-100+miles), and I benefit form those as well. Even with good cardio, the impact of doing dynamic drills with plates becomes painfully obvious really quickly.

I have a few plate carriers (one is a discreet, light, level IIIA rig). The other two are only setup with micro-chest rigs. I have to keep weight to a minimum and the bare essentials. If you think you need armor and you need to drive your truck, do work around the house, chop wood, etc., it's much nice doing it with a naked plate carrier and battle belt vice a combat kit loaded plate carrier...

My step is a little slower, and my dynamic drills are little less dynamic...know your limitations, but don't ignore the fitness aspect.

ROCK6
 

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I don't care who you are, your athleticism, your age, or your working tactical background...

The first time you don heavy armor & load bearing gear for all-day/multi-day repetitive wear, your muscles & joints are going to squawk. Either after a long break (from that kind of lifestyle) or because you've never previously worn the stuff for all waking/working hours.

Not sure how many muscles there are in the human body, but armor & load bearing gear (and rucks) tend to activate a majority of them. Soreness for a few initial days until you can train your body to handle the weight and new normal. Neck, back, torso, legs, groin, shoulders, spine, ankles, knees, feet. Damn near everything complains.

Just like getting into backpacking shape or hitting weights after a long hiatus.

Talking about having to wear the stuff for round-the-clock activities, not merely donning it for an hour or two out at the training range. Always an unpleasant transition when you've been away from that mode for awhile.

A way to beat that pain curve is to routinely wear the gear at home or work... just like you might wear a weight vest & ankle weights. For a full day of normal activity. Do that periodically (the same way you might schedule weight training, cardio, running, rucking, etc.). At least weekly.

Motrin is your friend.
 

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Another scenario for an optional light rig is when you are inside your own defensive umbrella. "Inside the wire". Maybe securely inside your own home or property line defenses. In a semi-permissive to non-permissive environment. You aren't expecting specific trouble or attack, but it is accepted that such things are possible/likely. Current events recommending having more than just a pistol handy.

Things being dangerous enough that you want to be armed with a long gun at all times (on your person, within arms reach, or within two steps). But you don't want to spend every waking minute walking around with 25-40 lbs of battle rattle draped across your body. So... you go with a battle belt and/or a very minimal chest rig or plate carrier setup. You have immediate access to a few reloads for the long gun that accompanies you for everyday tasks. Enough that you can return fire and then move to cover and don your parked/grounded main loadout gear.

A really big discriminator for owning more than one rig is your decision to wear (or not wear) armor. If no armor is worn, just about any load bearing rig will work. If you choose to wear armor, you have to start evolving your load to mate to that armor. Whether attached directly to it... or worn on a separate vest/chest rig designed to drape and ride securely over the armor rig. Which usually means that a second load bearing rig is convenient for those times where no armor is worn. Because if all your pouches are physically attached to the armor carrier... you can't instantly strip down weight/bulk except by taking the entire rig off.
This section in particular could be a routine copy-paste any time people start talking about SHTF gear. If something happens that bad enough for this gear to be required "daily wear" but there is still the work of survival/rebuilding/relocating to be done, anyone not in a group big enough to allow for dedicated security personnel is going to have to go about their essential duties. Figuring out a balance of sufficient protection and mobility will be really important. I sometimes form a mental image of how I would go about things like weeding my garden or repairing my fence while wearing some sort of chest rig, belt rig, etc. My surplus plate carrier fully equipped with ammo, IFAK and other items would be a serious burden, even if I wasn't moving around a lot. Having a battle belt on throughout the day, with either a lightweight vest/carrier worn or stowed nearby, would be a lot more tolerable.

Of course, when you're on your home turf, your must-have equipment can be within easy reach, unlike during an unplanned bugout.
 

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I still have my LBE from my days as an 11B (‘80’s & ‘90’s). It’s two 1 qt. canteens, 2 ammo pouches, BUTT pack, FAK, battle dressing pouch, compass, bayonet, Buck 110, belt and shoulder harnesses.

I wore an IBA (27# with SAPI plates) with 6 mags for a little over a year (A-Stan, ‘03-‘05). I’ll take my ‘web gear’ any day.
 

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I have been looking for a Load Bearing Vest that is MOLLE but also has the straps to hook to your belt. So it doubles as suspenders sort of. Helps to not have your pants sagging when you get a lot of weight on your belt. Not much luck so far except expensive setups. I like the old LBV like @Jlrhiner has in the first pic, but having it with MOLLE will let me move things around and add on. The 3rd one of his is not bad, but I can't find any with belt attachment straps. Again, I also am being a cheap S. O. B. on it. If I am going to spend a bunch, I am just going to buy a AR500 armor plate carrier and armor. I also know if I say I will get one and add straps, I will never get time.

I worry less about havibg acombat set up. If things blow, I am not gonna be getting into firefights I can avoid. BGs get lucky shots sometimes and it only takes one.
 

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That's a hard thing to find while remaining inexpensive. Here's something close that provides a MOLLE padded belt attached to a MOLLE LBV vest... for only $35. Obviously, with this rig and its warbelt, you aren't able to wear much on your trouser belt beyond small items like a folding knife pouch. But... this is a top tier hard use rig from yesteryear. For a song.

Camouflage Military camouflage Personal protective equipment Pattern Ammunition





Hell, for that price, I may order one for myself.
 
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I believe in multiple kits or rigs/bags for different purposes, although I don't have a different vest for every one. No problem as they can be optimized quickly.

Kits are Main Battle Rifle/DMR, long barrel bolt Sniper, medium range Urban Combat, rapid bugout/close range/truck kit, and a Riot Kit, which doubles as Home Defense.

Each kit has at least one sidearm, appropriate mags in multi-pouches, ammo specialized for each firearm, multiple flashlights, knives, and general tools such as pliers, wire cutters, screwdrivers, field cleaning kits, etc.

I even have extra kits to outfit my family/close allies/neighbors.

:love:
 

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I'm a great believer in being realistic. I'm not trying to be "Tacti-Cool" and probably wouldn't be getting too far from the property if things got that bad. Not in shape to be charging ahead with a 25 lb vest on. Not so foolish as to believe that we could last very long if the local area became a hot battlefield.

So I have 2 setups. One is a belt clip that holds 2 spare AR mags. The other is a shoulder bag that holds 6 mags, some water, and a few other useful items for getting further from the property.

I'll take the saved money and buy a bit of food.
 
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