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After some careful thought, I have decided that I should have multiple gear rigs for different applications.
One for recon, one for patrolling, etc, etc,.
I have a basic bug out bag, but need to assemble an assault pack, a support pack etc,.
Same with the couple GI pistol belts I have, and then apply the same to my FLC's or vests that I plan on developing.
It may seem like overkill to some, but by having multiple rigs to choose from, choices can then become streamlined to be mission specific.
 

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I'm also a fan of multiple sets of gear. I've been slowly putting together two of everything. Two 5.56mm carbines, two full size 9mm pistols, two plate carriers, ect. Mostly just to have a spare and have them set up similarly in case one gets lost/broken/whatever. Also, going quality over quantity with everything.
 

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After some careful thought, I have decided that I should have multiple gear rigs for different applications.
One for recon, one for patrolling, etc, etc,.
I have a basic bug out bag, but need to assemble an assault pack, a support pack etc,.
Same with the couple GI pistol belts I have, and then apply the same to my FLC's or vests that I plan on developing.
It may seem like overkill to some, but by having multiple rigs to choose from, choices can then become streamlined to be mission specific.
You should check out Arbor Arms Good'Nuff Gun Belt. Just got mine, light and strong.
 

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Multiple sets? Why? :ROFLMAO:

My hobby has made this possible. I've continued to refine my kits, mostly from dynamic training, but I will conceded their are different packages. I have three plate carrier setups. I have a couple of battle belt setups (ala LBE) for patrolling around the house; micro chest rigs for when doing mobil operations, covert/overt kits, etc. I have a good dozen chest rigs from a previous life as well from HSGI custom to ESSTAC and Tactical Tailor MAVs.









While "modular" sound cool, in practice it sucks. I've found if I use a pistol caliber for a class, it's just easier having a dedicated rig. I have one dedicated for traveling out of town (packs better). Same goes for some hunting applications where I use a .308 battle rifle. You can see where that leads too...



I do have to try and mirror key item pouches for similar indexing (pistol, mags, FAK, dump pouch), but stuff piles up when you're experimenting and using different firearms...

ROCK6
 

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After some careful thought, I have decided that I should have multiple gear rigs for different applications.
One for recon, one for patrolling, etc, etc,.
How do you see a fighting loadout differing for patrolling vs. recon vs. something else?
 

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How do you see a fighting loadout differing for patrolling vs. recon vs. something else?
Knowing the risks, I'm not doing recon with armor. If I'm gearing up for a fight, I'll use the plate/carrier. If it's a short range patrol, not much difference; long range patrol, I wouldn't use a battle belt, likely a chest rig that integrates with a pack's waist belt. I'm complicating things for some, but I have enough crap to apply for certain niche missions and have done my enough T&E for myself to figure out what works and what doesn't. One size doesn't fit all, but I also acknowledge the more complexity you add into a solution, it can create more room for error. I've found a good balance for me.

ROCK6
 

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Multiple setups can be both good and bad. Good because it allows many options, bad because you develop muscle memory for different things that might not be on the kit you’re wearing. My “recon” setup is a belt setup, no chest rig or PC. My long ranged patrol setup is my chest rig and belt, no PC, and the rest I just wear my PC under the chest rig.

I do have many other pieces of gear but I have found that being able to have all “levels” of kit to function seamlessly on their own or together works for just about everything.

I’ve also got an ultra low profile belt setup that allows for 1 rifle magazine, 2 pistol magazines, a dump pouch, an IFAK and a concealed OWB pistol that fits under my pull over hoodie. I’ve walked around crowded public places with this on and nobody has noticed.
 

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Some words to think about:

1. Profile.

Do you need to go discrete... or overt? Low profile minimal gear wearable under concealment garments... or open carry of whatever greater amount of shiznit you need to carry the day. Can you make one rig do both?

2. Scalability.

Does it have enough inherent stowage capacity (pockets, pouches, etc.) to upload to a maximum practical amount of bullets and water? Can I go lighter and more svelte by just not filling up every pouch? Just because my rig can carry 12 rifle mags... doesn't mean I'm forced to carry that many every time I go out. But the standing capacity is always there for when I need to go heavy... without having to change out to a different rig or reconfigure pouches.

3. Mobility.

Can I run, dodge, low crawl, climb, jump over obstacles, tread water, or wear in combination with a big pack and/or body armor? Can I wear this thing in snow while skiing/snowshoeing, or snowmobiling? Can I wear it while riding a horse, a bicycle, a motorcycle, an ATV, etc.? Can I wiggle through a culvert, small window, tight doorway, or hole in a fence with the rig on my body? Can I wriggle through thick brush and wait-a-minute vines?
 

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Multiple setups can be both good and bad. Good because it allows many options, bad because you develop muscle memory for different things that might not be on the kit you’re wearing.
For belts, I’ve been able to work various setups to allow very similar indexing. Not so much for the various chest rigs. They will work, but reload times go way up. The only difference is with my micro-chest rigs. I do a simple magazine management system where my primary reload is still on my belt, secondary is the first magazine on the left in my chest rig. If I have time and cover, I will move a magazine down to my belt rig and shift mags to the left on the chest rig. It sounds far more complicated than it really is and is easy to master and even do when under stress. While the goal is to change mags with cover in a tactical pause, this system keeps your reload-index handy for speed reloads when on the move, in the open, or in dynamic drills. The only system close to perfect is the one you repeatedly and routinely exercise and drill that system under as many conditions and situations as possible.

Some words to think about:
1. Profile.
Do you need to go discrete... or overt? Low profile minimal gear wearable under concealment garments... or open carry of whatever greater amount of shiznit you need to carry the day. Can you make one rig do both?
This can be a significant challenge. I do have a dedicated belt kit for “discreet carry” if needed; however, it’s pretty difficult to wear Level III+ plates discreetly. This is where I’ve had to compromise, take some risk, and apply to situations that haven’t become completely WROL. I ended up with some very light, thin Level IIIA plates vice soft armor as the plates are also stab-proof. With a minimalist carrier, I can get by wearing it under a T-shirt that is sized up one full size, but’s best used with a loose fitting button shirt or light jacket/hoodie. Why IIIA? This is my phased plate carrier choice when the threat level is elevated, but not a full blown SHTF. It’s only rated for handgun rounds which is simply the risk I have to take to keep it the protection concealable. The whole rig only weighs 3.5 pounds (both plates and carrier), so it’s an ultralight rig.

2. Scalability.
Does it have enough inherent stowage capacity (pockets, pouches, etc.) to upload to a maximum practical amount of bullets and water? Can I go lighter and more svelte by just not filling up every pouch? Just because my rig can carry 12 rifle mags... doesn't mean I'm forced to carry that many every time I go out. But the standing capacity is always there for when I need to go heavy... without having to change out to a different rig or reconfigure pouches.
This is where I really like the micro chest rigs. For colder weather, I can wear my level III+ slick carrier under a large jacket; I just look a little rotund, but it will work without drawing too much attention. I normally wear a battle belt, so I have a couple extra mags. If I add my Spiritus or Haley micro chest rig, they snap in and attach to the slick carrier giving me three extra mags. While less optimal, I could don my largest HSGI Denali chest rig over my slick carrier for maximum capacity (up to 12-16 AR magazines), but that would really be a static load kit; not a lot of maneuverability or dynamic dance moves with that heavy of a load out.

3. Mobility.
Can I run, dodge, low crawl, climb, jump over obstacles, tread water, or wear in combination with a big pack and/or body armor? Can I wear this thing in snow while skiing/snowshoeing, or snowmobiling? Can I wear it while riding a horse, a bicycle, a motorcycle, an ATV, etc.? Can I wiggle through a culvert, small window, tight doorway, or hole in a fence with the rig on my body? Can I wriggle through thick brush and wait-a-minute vines?
This applies to the above comment as well. I have some decent level Level III+ plates that if I keep the combat load reasonable, I can still do dynamic drills; that’s either a slick carrier-plus belt, or with the micro-chest rig and/or belt. Again, I have to sacrifice combat load to maintain mobility. It may only be 4-5 spare magazines on-hand, but it beats a mechanical injury that puts you down in the open with 400 rounds weighing your down. What I’ve also found is that I will only use a smaller assault pack with a plate carrier; combining with a full size pack just isn’t going to work anymore. I’ll haul the big pack to the truck but keep the smaller assault pack handy for a bail-out bag. Again, I have to make my own risk assessment and if I'm trying to trek long distance on foot with a large/heavy pack, the plate carrier is going to get cached. Mobility is the hardest aspect to address and balance with maximum protection with a determined combat load. The vast majority of people never train hard with their armor setups, I’m guilty to some degree. When temps are hovering near 100 degrees, plate carriers get dumped within the first hour. Looking tactical is easy; being tactical is difficult; training tactical can be a down-right PITA!

ROCK6
 

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Yeah, I’ve noticed most people want to do all the tactical gucci things before they even master the basics. They watch videos of all these operators looking cool and think that there’s some hidden advanced technique to it all. The heavy hitters are just so good at the basics it looks like they’re doing some advanced techniques when they’re really just doing basic things fast and smoothly.

Gotta actually train to get those skills and I’ve noticed training for a lot of people out there is virtually non-existent.
 

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I'm just a concerned citizen with no professional perspective on gear, so I base my choices on location and role: concealed, static/home defense, roaming neighborhood/property defense, etc. Over time, I've accumulated numerous vests, chest rigs and plate carriers, as well as plates of varying material and threat level rating. More recently, I started focusing on belt setups, following the same role-based plan. I've actually found the belt setup process to be more challenging, because a belt and its attached contents need to play nice with whatever chest rig I'm using, not affecting mobility or ease of access. I'm using a somewhat uncommon handgun choice, so holster options have been limited.

At least one of my plate carriers is somewhat over-the-top in terms of weight, but I wanted one that was essentially a completely combat-focused setup, speed and stealth be damned. That one currently has no plates inserted, as it wouldn't be something intended for "minuteman" response times. I've gone with a minimalist setup for that role.
 

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At least one of my plate carriers is somewhat over-the-top in terms of weight, but I wanted one that was essentially a completely combat-focused setup, speed and stealth be damned. That one currently has no plates inserted, as it wouldn't be something intended for "minuteman" response times. I've gone with a minimalist setup for that role.
I’m confused about this, it’s combat focused but doesn’t have plates? If it wasn’t combat focused I could understand but if it’s for something that you know you’ll end up on a 2 way shooting range, you want plates. Contrary to what you see in movies, television and video games, the bad guys know how to shoot straight too.
 

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Hi Sir,
What are the knife's on these 2 rigs and what brand of Vest is the second one? Thank you
1st pic is a Gerber Mk2; 2nd pic is a Gerber Strong-arm, 3rd pic is a Gerber LMF2 and 4th pic is a Gerber Prodigy.

The vest is a 5.11 made for "husky" boys.
 
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