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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay...I'll bite. I use one every day at work, but I'm not sure what I'll do with one when I'm crapping in a hole and eating bugs.

So tell me....why should it be in my B.O.Bag?
I never said it should be in a bug out bag.

But assuming long term survival is at stake eventually working with electronics is going to occur. either for necessity or creativity.

For instance:
Setting up a solar panel array for power.
Getting a radio to work.
Checking power of batteries.
 

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Pastor
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He's not talking in your BOB.
Yes, I have a Fluk 88
You may need one for diagnostics of field communications, or vehical repairs.
Or even that solar or wind generator repair.
The list of uses are vast.
Get an anolog meter also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He's not talking in your BOB.
Yes, I have a Fluk 88
You may need one for diagnostics of field communications, or vehical repairs.
Or even that solar or wind generator repair.
The list of uses are vast.
Get an anolog meter also.
I was talking to an electrical engineer this morning where I work. He's giving me a book all about the set up of a solar power system.

My first project is to try and get my xbox and TV to run off it.

Pwning noobs for the enviroment.
 

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veldskoen no socks
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I would, I also use one every day.
Come to a wrecked building and find some power outlets that you could use, rather use the fluke than your fingers to see if it is live or not.
 

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Destroyer of Ignorance
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I have a number of them. If you understand electronics, you'll need one.
 

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Banned
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I admit the need for books, but I think I'm covered on electronics. I tear apart and reassemble aircraft avionics all day.

Now growing food and medical information....those are some books I need!
Mt girlfriend works at Barnes & Noble. Shes always bringing me home books. An agricultural book is on the list.

We are going to grow some stuff next summer in some buckets to "get our feet wet".
 

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Cover your Six!!
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I was talking to an electrical engineer this morning where I work. He's giving me a book all about the set up of a solar power system.

My first project is to try and get my xbox and TV to run off it.

Pwning noobs for the enviroment.

Name,

I believe that you should have a multi-meter. Because You will need to do some electrical troubleshooting sooner or later. Radio Shack sells a compact Mulit-Meter that is the size of a Credit Card with built in test leads. Just make sure you hhave extra batteries for it.

I too have a solar array good for 100 watts, 20a, solar charger, 3 `12v AGM Deep Cycvle batteries w/ 300 amp hours of capacity, w/ a 2000 watt inverter. With Porper Load Management, I can run my two computers, TV, and a paddlefan (on low) and it will run for 4 hours. It will recharge during the day while nobody is home. I also made it so that I can take the array off the roof, along w/ the supporting gear and batteries, and put it in my Bug-Out Camper Trailer, so that when I get to our predetermined Rally Point, I can have 120v power to run a, Microwave, CB and HAM Radios, charge my Cordless Tools,... without having to run a generator. I do have an onboard generator, but I can now save the stored GAS for traveling instead of using GAS to make electric power. Of course I have my BOB ready to go as well if I have to go it on foot.

Right now with my Solar set-up at home, I am saving about $50-$60 a month on my electric bill. (I also have a Solar water Heater system as well. That helps for another $30 per month reduction).

Of Course, there is plenty of usefull info on the internet.

Hope this helps some!

FP
 

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meters for solar

I think having a meter is an excellent idea. I have larger solar electric systems in two of my buildings, I run my refrigerator, freezer, washing machine, lights, water pump of the systems. Having a meter is essential to keep track of how your system is performing. In a larger system having a hand held meter will be a good backup to your system metering, in a small backpack system a tiny meter would let you know if your batteries are charged or still need some time to charge.

Hint.....
If your system uses a MSW (modified sine wave) inverter, you will either need a "True-RMS" type meter to measure the inverters output, or at least be aware of the fact your readings will be different than expected. Since the MSW inverters output wave form is not a sine wave (has steps, not a smooth waveform), your non RMS meter will display a lower voltage than you expect, something like 90 volts. The inverter will be working perfectly, just displaying a lower voltage because your inexpensive meter expected a smoothe wave shape. You may not want to pay the extra money for a True RMS type, just measure the inverter output before a SHTF situation and keep in mind that you will be measuring a lower voltage.
 

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I have several Fluke brand Model 87 IV and 89 series meters.

I also possess a Fluke Model 1520 digital megohmmeter.

For me at least, the DMMs are essential, in the worst-case scenario.

I am an electrician and a very innovative technician.

I am also a certificated aircraft technician. In a worst-case scenario, any and all available resources would be utilized, including aircraft and power production equipment [i.e., generators, commercial, portable].

I may need to troubleshoot, analyze and repair any of these, for which a good DMM and secondarily the megohmmeter, would be deemed as essential.
 

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Kibitzer
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What will we see next, "Hammers, do we need them?".
I've used many multi-meters since the 1970s while working for telephone company.
If you don't know how to work one, learn. If you blow the fuse on first reading, you can't use meter until you get new fuse. Some meters have a spare inside.
If you get a digital meter you won't have to worry about polarity.
Heck, I saw a guy blow a meter and his name was Simpson, just like the meter he was using. And when we opened the meter to replace the fuse, one guy asked why there was "D" and "C" batteries inside.
 
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