Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Mother of One.
Joined
·
234 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, it's now that time. Got my baby lemon tree, and a couple of pots of ornamental flowers (hibiscus and the like) in for winter. Everything else is ready to hang tough outside. Just have to pick up a burlap sack for my rose bush for when it gets below freezing. I've got the big guys all along a giant picture window that gets full afternoon sun.

Anybody else moving their plants in?
 

·
Founder
Joined
·
16,867 Posts
Nope, if they die, they die. Survival of the fittest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
I have a Lemon Verbena plant that I plan to bring indoors. I also have a Meiwa kumquat, Meyers Lemon, and a Satsuma orange tree that I plan to mound since they are young and this will be their first winter.

This instructions below were taken from an article that TAMU agriculture put our for protecting young citrus trees. [URL="http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/extension/homefruit/citrus/citrus.html"]http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/extension/homefruit/citrus/citrus.html I need to buy the copper-based fungicide that is mentioned. [/URL]
Cold Protection
Several kinds of wraps are used on the trunk of young citrus in the belief that they will provide significant cold protection. With one exception, none provide more than a few degrees of protection to a young tree trunk. The wraps do prevent rodent damage and sprouts on the trunk, but they also may harbor insects, particularly ants, which can cause problems. The best cold protection possible for young citrus is a soil bank, which can be used for the first two to four winters.
Soil banks are put up around Thanksgiving and taken down about the first of March. A soil bank is a mound of soil piled as high as feasible around the trunk and lower scaffold limbs. Thus, the trunk and lower scaffolds will be protected from even the worst freeze, although the unprotected top may be killed completely. The tree will regrow from the trunk and scaffolds without going back to the rootstock.
Before banking, treat the bark to be covered with a suitable insecticide and a copper-based fungicide to preclude problems while the bank is up. Exercise extreme care in removing the banks to prevent damaging the bark, as it will be quite tender from spending the winter underground. Use the garden hose to wash off the last of the soil. If there is not enough soil from around the tree to build a good bank, borrow from the garden or use potting soil. The extra soil should be taken away upon bank removal.
 

Attachments

1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top