Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
‘n Boer maak ‘n plan
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I fixate, so should you, on "Getting Out!" early and haste towards the more demographically survivable areas (NC, WC). Bikes have been mentioned on the SA forum, but of no emphasis.

This thread is dedicated to bikes, and which ever content or context surrounds it. If it is just chatter then post that on the SHTF 2019 thread (a library of 95% bull**** and 5% really! really! important reading).

Here is an extract that you might find cathartic:

"I did not realize how important a motorcycle could be until I left Paris the day the Germans entered. For sixty or a hundred miles the roads were jammed with fleeing pedestrian and military and civilian vehicular traffic of all kinds. On the motorcycle we were able to pass everything on the road and especially the long columns held up by the single-lane bottlenecks of the barricades."

http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/tactical-uses-motorcycles


To boot, TIA. We will not have German officers or soldiers to contend with at the blockades... we will have machete yielding gentlemen.

With a bike you do not need a road.

Which type/make/model and size would you recommend? Reliability as the prime. Trailers (that the bike pulls) etc. ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Very good point, i ride everyday and would say;
something air cooled, on/off road, easy to work on/maintain, light on juice, something not too popular (might get stolen), something very popular (able to easly get spares), with plastic petrol tank (preferably long range petrol tank), not too loud, ...maybe xt 500/600, crf 230, ag200, dr 200.....my2c

Sent from my GT-I9505
 

·
‘n Boer maak ‘n plan
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Lucknut

I was thinking XR200, bikes we used on the farm, but apparently parts are hard to come by nowdays.

In terms of popularity it must be one of the Toyota's of bikes... like a Toyota I seek 2 things. 1 - reliability, 2 Parts (or the relative easy to procure).

Of those you mentioned which would you prefer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
I would recommend something like a DRZ400se or a KLR650. They are plenty capable of ditch-banging your way out of a populated area. The problem is with fuel capacity. I usually see about 100 miles of range on the DRZ400SE before it hits the reserve tank. Not sure about the KLR650. You can get oversized fuel tanks for DRZ400SE that takes it from 2.5 gallons to about 4 or 4.5 gallons. That turns your range into 200+ miles before hitting the reserve tank.

The drz400 weighs less than the KLR, which is useful if you have a tip-over or need to do some more technical riding. The KLR is bigger and more capable of hauling luggage.

The DRZ400 can handle highways. I'm recommending these bikes because they have bigger displacement and engines that are tuned for torque and reliability. I'd love to recommend you get a YZ250 2 stroke if you are an experienced rider that might be interested in riding straight through the woods off of the beaten path. I used to race a yz250 in the woods for up to 2 hours before the final lap was over. I could do the same trails on a DRZ400, but it wouldn't be at race-pace because the 400 4 stroke weighs far more and the suspension is not suitable for an advanced and aggressive racer riding over downed trees, deep ruts, and boulder gardens at race pace. The YZ was a bike that I raced supercross and motocross with, then adjusted the suspension with a screwdriver and I was set to do a woods race. I'd replace the stock piston with a forged Wiseco piston and it would be set for 250-300 hours of racing before I would replace it again purely out of caution. I never blew up an engine while using a forged piston like Wiseco.

This is the supermoto version of the DRZ, but the main difference for your intent and purpose is wheel/tire combo.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lh92KbXnXYk

The bike is common. Get a good O-Ring chain on it with some steel sprockets and you will not have to worry about it very much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
You can also get saddlebags for the KLR. I think you can get some sort of cargo-carrying capabilities made for the DRZ as well. These bikes are often used as adventure bikes and a lot of parts are available for them that will tailor them well to being used as a bugout bike if needed.
 

·
‘n Boer maak ‘n plan
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ideally I want 2 bikes to launch off my trailer, only if need be. Parked facing back and readied to depart. 2 of exactly the same bikes so that I can use one to fix the other.


edit:

When I was 12 I had a IT490 for 2 days once.
 

·
‘n Boer maak ‘n plan
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
"I did not realize how important a motorcycle could be until I left Paris the day the Germans entered. For sixty or a hundred miles the roads were jammed with fleeing pedestrian and military and civilian vehicular traffic of all kinds. On the motorcycle we were able to pass everything on the road and especially the long columns held up by the single-lane bottlenecks of the barricades."
 

·
‘n Boer maak ‘n plan
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Mud is problem, so is weight, scooter wise

Note that this was back in 1940, how true... even more true today
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,626 Posts
The klr 650 is big and heavy, more suited to speed on roads.

I had a 250 the weight capacity was officially 250 pounds though it was quick enough even with two riders. Not comfortable at highway speeds though. You could possibly change sprockets but it wassnt worth it to me. Great size on trails, in town, and rural roads up to 55mph.

Liquid cooled is quieter and because tolerances can be tighter much longer lasting. It is slightly heavier and more complex. But reliable.

After the LA quake I heard bikes were very popular till roads were fixed.

Bikes with a sidecar or trailer become something other than a bike. ATV might be better.

Last weekend there were a bunch of trikes out, 2 wheels in front. Looked like on road toys only though.

I'm not much of a rider so take this with a grasin of salt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
Will you be using a bike on the main roads?

The Yamaha TW200 also has a big cult following. At 65mph its a little limited for main hwy usage, but its a beast off road, while adequate for secondary roads, (55-65mph) and 75 mpg.

You can get a brand new one for less than $4600, with a year warranty. It has one of the most bullet proof engines Yamaha ever built.





Sent from a Galaxy far far away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
The only reason why i would go with a air cooled engines is that you have radiators that can get damaged, you must have access to water, hoses, jubilee clamps, etc too many things that you would have to consider and have available. I have a DRZ 400 E as well that i just use off road for tracks, bush riding, etc, very powerful for what it is, i am always thinking a stone will go through the radiator or a failed water hose, water pump etc,
When I go touring i always carry a clutch cable, water, duct tape, jubilee clamps, cable ties, etc.....

Sent from my GT-I9505
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
Good point about liquid cooling. It is indeed more stuff to break. However, the Radiator setups on dirtbikes is very robust. I have dented and bashed radiators in all kinds of situations. Crashing in rock gardens, chrashing on motocross tracks etc etc and the radiators never had a leak or any sacrifice in ability even after I mangled them.

Regardless, I'd trust air cooling even more. Spare cables, spare masterlink for the chain, some "quik steel" or JB weld if your engine/trans gets a leaky case, and a spare spark plug are a good idea.

Also, you will want to bring water with you. Riding a dirbike off road for an extended period of time is not like riding on the street or driving a car. It can be quite physically demanding if you are in challenging terrain or if you run out of gas and have to hike/push for a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,626 Posts
The worst terrain I rode was on smooth cantelope size rocks. You couldn't go fast and ground was constantly shifting under wheels. On a lightweight bike wind can be another problem. Traffic really is the biggest danger, its like some people drive like you're not there.
Never seen those one wheel trailers. Interesting.
 

·
HidingInPlainSight 3%
Joined
·
717 Posts
I fixate, so should you, on "Getting Out!" early and haste towards the more demographically survivable areas (NC, WC). Bikes have been mentioned on the SA forum, but of no emphasis.

This thread is dedicated to bikes, and which ever content or context surrounds it. If it is just chatter then post that on the SHTF 2019 thread (a library of 95% bull**** and 5% really! really! important reading).

Here is an extract that you might find cathartic:

"I did not realize how important a motorcycle could be until I left Paris the day the Germans entered. For sixty or a hundred miles the roads were jammed with fleeing pedestrian and military and civilian vehicular traffic of all kinds. On the motorcycle we were able to pass everything on the road and especially the long columns held up by the single-lane bottlenecks of the barricades."

http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/tactical-uses-motorcycles


To boot, TIA. We will not have German officers or soldiers to contend with at the blockades... we will have machete yielding gentlemen.

With a bike you do not need a road.

Which type/make/model and size would you recommend? Reliability as the prime. Trailers (that the bike pulls) etc. ?
These have everything,,, NO TWO STROKE ENGINES, gas might be hard to come by,, but having to acquire two stroke oil is too much to worry about!!

http://www.ducatiusa.com/multistrada/1200enduro.do ...$$$$$$$$

http://www.apriliausa.com/motorcycles/caponord-1200-abs-travel-pack.html ..$$$$$

or go with a Japanese model like:

https://www.kawasaki.com/Products/2017-Versys-650-LT ...$$$ :thumb:

One of these will take you(and a friend and gear) about ANYWHERE you want to go.. and get there QUICKLY and SAFELY!!

and have an extra clutch cable..just in case.
..... I am a very experienced rider so the size and power of these is great for me,, maybe too much for a novice or scared person trying to "get away"..

..I ride a 2015 CRF450X for fun... stop with the front wheel, steer with the rear wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,474 Posts
We have been getting set up on our BOL and, even though the roads are not paved, several people ride dirt bikes there and do fine. I have several bikes from scooter to Yamaha Fazer 600. I have a Pulsar 180 and a Big Boy Flame 200cc. I have ridden the 180, 200 and 600cc bikes on gravel roads, but I felt most comfortable on the smaller ones. I believe the 180 to 250cc range is going to be the best overall choice, because they can handle the highway and are light enough to handle them easily off-road. Big Boy or SAM, (if you want off road) can be had second hand for a reasonable price.
 

·
it begins where it ends
Joined
·
774 Posts
I have over 25 yrs of riding and racing experience. As much as I love my KTM 300 I wouldn't consider it for my bug out arsenal. When SHTF no matter if you're on a 2 stroke or a 4 stroke, a 200 or a 1200, you simply cannot fit all your gear and your wife and kids on the thing. Your range will be limited on an off road, even with a long range tank. A larger bike like a GS or a KTM 990 will be limiting in very technical terrain. Your riding experience level will limit you even more. Unless you really know how to ride and can ride hard, you will open Pandora's box for yourself with seriously disabling injuries. Bikes make a noise, you will give away your position. Besides the problem of parts availability, unless you put a mousse in your tyres, a simple puncture cannot be repaired without the means to re inflate your wheel. A bike has its place and it can serve a purpose, but only with carefull planning and preparation. It's not a get out of town option if you have a family or a decent amount of preps that need to go with you. You will also need to have your BOL within 100km of your departure point if you plan on going full off road and accept that when you arrive at your BOL you will have a fancy paperweight with an empty tank if you do not already have stored fuel waiting for you. I love my bikes, but they are not part of my strategy. I have bought myself a 2 horses, one for myself and my wife. They are silent, they don't run out of fuel and they can cover technical terrain that my wife would never manage on a bike. They are positioned close to my BOL and will afford me many more traveling options than any of my beloved bikes I have ever owned.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top