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Red White and Blue
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https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/1...coronavirus-selfish-stupid-food-this-morning/

Emma, a mum-of-two from Lancaster, was branded ‘selfish and stupid’ by viewers, as Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield grilled her over her shopping.

The mum revealed she’s hoarded around 400 tins and 700 nappies, and stocked up on essentials like flour to make bread.

She defended her decision, saying: “I think it's best we go to shops and supermarkets as little as possible.

“I think stockpiling done properly and don’t go too excessive is ok. . . if you prepare months in advance or buy it off Amazon.”


needless to say some were critical
But viewers were outraged by Emma’s overflowing kitchen, claiming stockpilers like her are the reason behind national shortages.

Taking to Twitter, one person wrote: “This makes me so angry, many people can't afford that much shopping let alone hoard it. I hope this woman has given some to the food bank. We all need to get on with life, hiding away in doors & hoarding is not the answer.”


'hoarding' sounds bad. being prepared sounds good.

I say good on her for preparing. parent instinct is to take care of your kids. nobody's bidness if she uses her money thus.
 

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Hording vs stockpiling.

Hording (Emergency Management program definition) is acquiring assets in high demand/low supply during a time of scarcity.

Stockpiling is acquiring assets during a time of low demand/high supply and is actually BENNIFICIAL to the public and emergency managers.

1. It keeps the manufacturers going/profiting during times of low demand.
2. They may share (during times of low supply)
3. Even if they are "selfish" and share with NO ONE: It still DECREASES the demand on the system in times of low supply/high demand.

That's the professional viewpoint, not mine (mine matches)

It IS stupid to share this information with others however.

IF there is an actual scarcity: I agree.
I buy NO ammo etc all when there is high demand. This helps EVERYONE even if I do not 'turn lose' of my 'hord'
I doubt that right now she is taking the last pound of flour.

Eta:

I wanted to post before and after I read The article:

It is SAD that these subjects are restricted to BB GUNS to defend their lives and property.
 

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One of my friends called back in April, about two weeks into the lockdown here in Kansas. She was lamenting the empty shelves and worrying how they'd get by. She's not cooked routinely(on going health issues) for some time, relying on her husband and take out food. She told me that "Those damned Doomsday Preppers" emptied the shelves. I told her she was wrong, that it was NOT the preppers who bought all the tp and black beans at Walmart. I told her the preppers already HAD their supplies when this all went south. She wanted to know WHO's fault it was...got kinda quiet when I told her it was the people who never kept more than a few days worth of food and supplies in their homes.. they panicked. We talked two or three times a week til about May; I told her (at first) about items available at my local store, but that was just too far to drive..I finally quit telling her. I doubt things are any different at her house today. You cannot force common sense on people.
 

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Who cares what people think.

While I might be considered selfish for buying a hundred cans of food at the grocery store for myself, I might consider that person buying a hundred cans of food as a normal grocery trip for a family of 8 kids selfish for having 8 kids in the first place.

This lady is going to forgo her next shopping trips, so those times it will be negative selfish. She's going to eventually consume the food.
 

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Who cares what people think.

While I might be considered selfish for buying a hundred cans of food at the grocery store for myself, I might consider that person buying a hundred cans of food as a normal grocery trip for a family of 8 kids selfish for having 8 kids in the first place.

This lady is going to forgo her next shopping trips, so those times it will be negative selfish. She's going to eventually consume the food.
Ironically, if she did NOT prepare for hard times, the same critics would dump on her for not having the good sense to take care of her children properly. Danged if you do, danged if you don't. Do the right thing, and don't tell your business.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I support her. But Why did she reveal anything about her pantry to anyone in the first place?
Apparently some people just can't help it. Even here on this site, I can't begin to count the number of posts where people have said others have criticized them for storing food or ammo. My first instinct is to wonder "why did you tell them?" All that ever achieves is the "I'm coming to your house" reply.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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One of my friends called back in April, about two weeks into the lockdown here in Kansas. She was lamenting the empty shelves and worrying how they'd get by. She's not cooked routinely(on going health issues) for some time, relying on her husband and take out food. She told me that "Those damned Doomsday Preppers" emptied the shelves. I told her she was wrong, that it was NOT the preppers who bought all the tp and black beans at Walmart. I told her the preppers already HAD their supplies when this all went south. She wanted to know WHO's fault it was...got kinda quiet when I told her it was the people who never kept more than a few days worth of food and supplies in their homes.. they panicked. We talked two or three times a week til about May; I told her (at first) about items available at my local store, but that was just too far to drive..I finally quit telling her. I doubt things are any different at her house today. You cannot force common sense on people.
When the store runs first began, it jogged an old memory that really hit me hard at the time. Back when California had the big earthquake that cost so many lives, the news reporters were interviewing people. One was a young man who said he was a single father of a young daughter. That he always bought their food from the deli on the way home from work. Now he and his daughter have nothing to eat. And begging someone to please help. Angry at the government for not being there immediately to save them.

That hit me hard at the time because of the kid counting on him to provide and he can't. I thought "what kind of father doesn't have food in the house to feed his kid". It didn't have to be a major emergency. He could have gotten sick or injured and couldn't get out to buy food. Any number of things. And he didn't have, at least some food in the house?

We've just seen this play out on a larger scale. Huge numbers of people who had no preps. I'm sure some will learn from this...maybe. But most won't. Proven by the number of people in hurricane prone areas that STILL empty the stores at the last minute and complain that there is nothing to buy, that they have no food or water at home.
 

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Apparently some people just can't help it. Even here on this site, I can't begin to count the number of posts where people have said others have criticized them for storing food or ammo. My first instinct is to wonder "why did you tell them?" All that ever achieves is the "I'm coming to your house" reply.
Might not have been them who told what's in the storage room. Might have been kids who blabbed. Several of my kids went thru stages where they thought it was cool to show or tell their friends how their parents stocked food. One dd pulled out jars of dehydrated veggies and told her friend, "This USED to be food!" As recently as April, one of my adult daughters posted on a mutual friend's FB thread, saying "Mom's panicking like it's Y2k." That was pure fabrication on her part, as we had talked and I was letting her know we were fine. She hasn't been here but once since March, so how would she know? Just saying, kids of all ages blab.
 

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That is a lot of diapers. I hope she got a variety of sizes because babies do grow and estimating needs is not easy. I guess they could be traded though part of the point is avoiding contact.
Contactless exchanges are pretty simple to arrange. Fb garage sale groups do this every day. Porch pickups are great. Works well in small communities where people know eachother.
 

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People are shocked and angry at this person...

++
Some what the usual response to preppers everywhere by people who can't think ahead..

You also must consider that the European life style seems to be to shop for meals no more than a couple days ahead.. It seems this has been a way of life for a hundred or more years especially as home refrigerators and other such appliances were much later additions to single family home than North America it seems.. We see that here with immigrants from northern Europe..

Yes.. She also should have kept quiet..
 

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Back in my VERY early days I had a few shelves in a pantry about 2 feet deep and 3 feet wide. My stepmother, visiting, was so impressed she took photos of it. Rather upset when I said I didn't want them online.

I mentioned, in passing, a few months ago how happy I was I finally got my 25 pound sack of lentils and they just thought that was over the top. So we won't tell them about the other sack of lentils, or the rice, TVP, etc. So I don't talk to them about it because I KNOW THEY WILL BLAB. They don't have anything mentally wrong but she is a huge gossip. I have to accept that and plan accordingly or I am going to have every local Houston family member (quite a few actually) beating down my door.

I had to learn the hard way about saying I had anything. I was able to combat the "coming to your house" by passing it off as a fleeting mental illness fantasy and I had "eaten or given to a food bank and had nothing left just like you".

There was a woman north of Houston who showed off her shoe collection on TV. Many designer shoes, etc. She was later robbed and blamed the TV exposure.
 

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Food resources are just like having food insurance, only it is a tangible asset that will keep you alive. If you are responsible for the welfare of another individual, then some form of food storage is an essential function of caring for the person or persons that you are responsible for. What is the correct amount of food may vary, depending on current events or fear of future events. Anyone that is familiar with world history will know that bad things happen in the course of human events and should prepare on a prudent scale. It is not a difficult thing to do, if you only pick up a few extra cans, containers, or packages whenever you are out shopping, it will add up quickly and you will find yourself looking for extra storage room. In my situation I consider 2-3 months worth of food supply adequate, without being too concerned about spoilage and concern of having to rotate a large supply of food. But, part of the plan it to run out on a last minute shopping spree when the big storm is coming just like everyone else, in order to augment whatever supplies I may already have on hand.
 

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In my area the utility Co. sends out a monthly preparedness newsletter. They have a calendar so you know how much of what to buy each month per person. They also have a photo contest where you can take a pic of your pantry or whatever and win a small solar generator or something else. I would never post pics. But I like this about my community. At least they tell you ahead of time that they’re not going to help you!
 

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This article is fun as well.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/11313927/coronavirus-stockpilers-protect-bb-gun-chainsaw/



‘If people try and steal my stockpile they face me and my chainsaw’

Gemma Keough, 32, is from Greater Manchester and mum to Brianna, eight, Kenneth, five, and three-year-old Kayden.

The building maintenance worker started stockpiling when the news about coronavirus first hit and has 12 loaves in her freezer, as well as hundreds of tea bags and sweet treats too.

Her husband Stephen works as a cleaner, often at night, and she keeps a chainsaw near her in case she has to protect her groceries.


 

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This article is fun as well.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/11313927/coronavirus-stockpilers-protect-bb-gun-chainsaw/



‘If people try and steal my stockpile they face me and my chainsaw’

Gemma Keough, 32, is from Greater Manchester and mum to Brianna, eight, Kenneth, five, and three-year-old Kayden.

The building maintenance worker started stockpiling when the news about coronavirus first hit and has 12 loaves in her freezer, as well as hundreds of tea bags and sweet treats too.

Her husband Stephen works as a cleaner, often at night, and she keeps a chainsaw near her in case she has to protect her groceries.



Am I the only one thinking an electric chainsaw might not be the best choice for SHTF protection?

Hey, good to know the people in the UK can still buy BB guns and electric chainsaws at least.
 
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