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Fire cleanses all.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came to a stand still here, trying to think of something that no one has come up with and so on, but I found that to be a little difficult. Considering that I'm nearly positive that this kind of thread has been made before.
So I guess this is just for me. What, in your own opinion, are the most useful tools or supplies for a BOB? I lean towards a durable sharp knife as its role is not defined to a single category, it can serve as a weapon, or a tool, easy to maintain and easy to conceal, it has the traits of a great survival item. where in if you pair it with other items such as rifles for hunting it's uses start to vary even more. So let me know what you think! :thumb:
 

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Fire cleanses all.
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Water does get rather heavy. water purification however, that isn't as heavy. and knowledge of the area where you plan to bug out to can help with water. so yea, Water's definitely up there.
 

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Founder
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List of threads about bug out bag contents

http://www.survivalistboards.com/tags.php?tag=bug+out+bag+contents

Your not planning on walking are you? You should have bottled water to take with you.

Some important items for your bug out bag:

Road Map
Contact phone numbers
Copies of insurance papers and titles
Cell phone charger
 

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I would say sturdy shoes.

But as for a "you can only have one item" thing - Number one item that would be very difficult to make a substitute is a metal pot



I went over six months bugging out along the Appalachian Trail and think I used a knife less than a half dozen times... mostly to open packaging. Knives are barely worth their weight.
 

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NOT GunKid22-Beenthere22
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440 Posts
I used to spend extensive amounts of time in backcountry travel, and I always found that a spiriluna supplement powder was a great thing to rely on if I didn't have food for a bit. I've eaten a lot of it in the wilderness areas of Idaho and so I have a real fondness for it. It tastes bad though, you gotta get used to it. I'm also from a group of guides that used to challenge each other to not bring sleeping bags or tents on our trips. I always have a sleeping bag, but I'm an advocate of small minimalist shelters like bivy sacks (probably spent 300 nights in a bivy sack myself) and small parawing shelters like the Kelty Noah's Tarp and the MSR wings. they can be used for a multitude of things including water catch. I can't say those are the most important, but those are things that I have in mine that many may not... just to maybe give someone something to google :)

I also tend to live in places with a lot of precipitation, so all of my preparedness gear shows the hydrophobic nature of any situation where I would be away from a roof.
 

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Father of 11 husband of 1
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10,933 Posts
I used to spend extensive amounts of time in backcountry travel, and I always found that a spiriluna supplement powder was a great thing to rely on if I didn't have food for a bit. I've eaten a lot of it in the wilderness areas of Idaho and so I have a real fondness for it. It tastes bad though, you gotta get used to it. I'm also from a group of guides that used to challenge each other to not bring sleeping bags or tents on our trips. I always have a sleeping bag, but I'm an advocate of small minimalist shelters like bivy sacks (probably spent 300 nights in a bivy sack myself) and small parawing shelters like the Kelty Noah's Tarp and the MSR wings. they can be used for a multitude of things including water catch. I can't say those are the most important, but those are things that I have in mine that many may not... just to maybe give someone something to google :)
Do you mean Spirulina, or are you talking about something else?
 

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Father of 11 husband of 1
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10,933 Posts
I almost never carry a plain knife anymore. BOB's can have many things but it sounds like you really want to know about EDC (every day carry)
For me it's a Leathermans tool, my emergency meds, small flashlight, pepper spray. G27 and a spare mag. I try to always wear good shoes and, just as importantly, good socks. A p-38 and something to start a fire.
 

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NOT GunKid22-Beenthere22
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440 Posts
Do you mean Spirulina, or are you talking about something else?
yeah; i spelled it wrong. the autocorrect was helping me along there. Spirulina. and kudos on the p38. I assumed that would be in there, but those things are invaluable for their size.
 

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17 Oaks Ranch Tx
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3,890 Posts
I came to a stand still here, trying to think of something that no one has come up with and so on, but I found that to be a little difficult. Considering that I'm nearly positive that this kind of thread has been made before.
So I guess this is just for me. What, in your own opinion, are the most useful tools or supplies for a BOB? I lean towards a durable sharp knife as its role is not defined to a single category, it can serve as a weapon, or a tool, easy to maintain and easy to conceal, it has the traits of a great survival item. where in if you pair it with other items such as rifles for hunting it's uses start to vary even more. So let me know what you think! :thumb:
I think there are an assortment of tools or items. As for items then its water if you live in the desert.

As for tools, well I have to say in thinking about it and boiled down to what if I could ONLY have one thing to carry with me. The it would be multi-purpose knife for all the reasons you stated.

IMO the most single important item for the long run...
 

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Fire cleanses all.
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
..about 3 to 4 feet of clear tubing small enough to fit through a unleaded fuel gascap/gastank..:thumb:.
Haha, yea, I suppose so. Though if something were to happen where we'd need to siphon gas to get by I imagine any generic garden hose would suffice. God knows there will be plenty of them floatin' around after a situation like that. But I do agree with you. :thumb:
 

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Fire cleanses all.
Joined
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I used to spend extensive amounts of time in backcountry travel, and I always found that a spiriluna supplement powder was a great thing to rely on if I didn't have food for a bit. I've eaten a lot of it in the wilderness areas of Idaho and so I have a real fondness for it. It tastes bad though, you gotta get used to it. I'm also from a group of guides that used to challenge each other to not bring sleeping bags or tents on our trips. I always have a sleeping bag, but I'm an advocate of small minimalist shelters like bivy sacks (probably spent 300 nights in a bivy sack myself) and small parawing shelters like the Kelty Noah's Tarp and the MSR wings. they can be used for a multitude of things including water catch. I can't say those are the most important, but those are things that I have in mine that many may not... just to maybe give someone something to google :)

I also tend to live in places with a lot of precipitation, so all of my preparedness gear shows the hydrophobic nature of any situation where I would be away from a roof.
Very insightful, thank you. I'll have to pick some of that up whenever I can.
 

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Are we talking hiking a trail for fun or forced survival? With a knife and firesteel I can coal burn a vessel, build shelter, fire and whittle trap parts and other tools and weapons. I suppose I could fracture rocks for a blade but rocks are scarce here. Lots of yucca for cordage though. Having knowlege to improvise doesnt weigh much.
 

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Fire cleanses all.
Joined
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Are we talking hiking a trail for fun or forced survival? With a knife and firesteel I can coal burn a vessel, build shelter, fire and whittle trap parts and other tools and weapons. I suppose I could fracture rocks for a blade but rocks are scarce here. Lots of yucca for cordage though. Having knowledge to improvise doesn't weigh much.
Well, I'm mainly talkin' about being forced to survive. Most of the stuff people have talked about I already have in my BOB, said for a few items. though I guess nothing really compares to knowledge of your local area. That to me is the most important thing and can't fit in any BOB. I live in central Colorado, by the mountains, and I don't plan on staying in one place for an extended period of time, especially because people get crazy when their light bulbs and internet are threatened. So I can only imagine what it's going to be like when their food and water's running out. We have yucca here as well, the roots of some genes are edible though I'm not sure which ones are. but we do have plenty of hardy tree's as well, and most of those have pretty stringy bark, so good for cordage as well. A lot of pine tree's and aspen. There's really a lot in my metaphoric back yard that's useful. lol
 
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