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For small quantities, yes. For larger items, not necessarily.

Plus, of course, if you're talking survival, it requires a lot of electrons to run, doesn't fit well in backpacks, and isn't really practical to plug in out in the woods. :)
 

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Plenty of Urbanites try to survive. Same concepts apply to city as well as nature: where to find best foods (supermarket vs hunting grounds), water treatment, dangerous areas. And energy production could be more easily met in/near civilization.
 

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If you have access to Solar/Sogen or an Inverter a Smallish Induction Hob works I have one that can Chew up to 1600w but it can use less, I am thinking of buying one that uses 800w I just seen which might be a better option,

Apart from the smell of food cooking there is Zero smoke to Highlight where you are, Amazon is your best place to look for one,

I might order one and see how it goes, (y)

Hope that helps,
 

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Aside from getting the most efficiency from a given amount of fuel (or cook time per amount of fuel), you can also cut the food into smaller pieces to cook faster.
 

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I would think 800w electric cooker would be very slow, not enough power to say boil a big pot of water.
I have never done the cook directly on hot coals meat thing but have wanted to try it. You don't use briquettes because of added chemicals, nor coal, just lump charcoal.
 

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I would think 800w electric cooker would be very slow, not enough power to say boil a big pot of water.
I have never done the cook directly on hot coals meat thing but have wanted to try it. You don't use briquettes because of added chemicals, nor coal, just lump charcoal.
Well I have a 1600w version and I tested it out on the medium setting which was drawing about 1065w and it took about 6 minutes to boil about 2 litres of water So at 1065 / 60 = 17.75w per min X 6 = 106.5w power used,

I Ordered that 800w Induction Hob a couple of hours ago so when it arrives I will test it and see how well it does, Reason being is I want something I can run from the Inverter in my new Sogen/Battery Pack for cooking in the Camp/Van.

I am in the middle of switching out all my high wattage items to Low Watt Appliances so fingers crossed it all works. (y)
 

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Another thing I like is the electric kettle. It will boil water faster than my gas stove on high, so now I boil water in the kettle, put it in the pan with the pasta, then put it on the stove to finish the pasta.
I’m not sure, but I’d bet the energy use is lower that way.


What's the best approach to solar cooking? How do you keep your food from drying out while waiting for it to warm up? Put oil in the pan, heat it, then add foodstuffs?
The secret is “liquid, and lids”.
Think slow cooker, but using thin black pans with glass lids. You can cook a roast or a turkey, some people use oven bags for that.

You can fry with some solar coolers, like the parabolic reflectors. But those are terrible for longer types of cooking as you have to track the sun to focus on the pan.
 

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Another thing I like is the electric kettle. It will boil water faster than my gas stove on high, so now I boil water in the kettle, put it in the pan with the pasta, then put it on the stove to finish the pasta.
I’m not sure, but I’d bet the energy use is lower that way...
Yah, they are pretty neat! We've been using them for a few years now normally a few times a day. Onto our second one, as the first the bottom got all cruddy plus was leaking a little bit. Have a third in stowage, as backup to the second.
 

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you can make a meal with a handful of thin sticks, most people think you need a huge fire for that, but you really don't. but then again a big pot of soup (5+ gallons) takes mor fuel but not a whole lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I was very curious about how much cooking I could get done with a bag of charcoal so I did the following:

Ok here is what I found: Each bricket weighs .6 oz. and I buy two 20 lb. bags for about $19 when on sale. So lets do the math.
Each bricket weighs about .6 oz.
16 oz/ .6 oz = 26 per pound. times 40 lbs = 1,040 brickets
Divide this by 12 (the amount per cooking session for two meals, 1040/12= 87
So two meals times 87 = 174 meals. A little more than 11 cents per meal.
I may get more, but I rounded down the math.
So in a SHTF situation I could cook/boil water for about three months.
More bags more months.
But like I said in the beginning, I just do this when camping and boondocking. Which is a good dry run for when the SHTF.
 

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What's the scenario? Is this just when camping, backpacking, bugging out, bugging in? I've boiled a kettle of water on a Biolite biofuel stove in 5 minutes using just a pine cone and some pine needles that I scrounged. It also charged my phone. Not a bad way to go if you want water for coffee and a FD or dehydrated meal.

For bugging in, cooking on a woodstove that you're already using to heat the house will use the least amount of fuel since you're already burning the wood for heat. Of course that's not practical in the summer which is when I'd use a solar oven. Have had some delicious meals prepared by a friend in his, including a whole roast chicken with potatoes.
 

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you can make a meal with a handful of thin sticks, most people think you need a huge fire for that, but you really don't. but then again a big pot of soup (5+ gallons) takes mor fuel but not a whole lot.
agree. A small rocket stove that takes twigs can heat up water quickly and after that a small skillet with a lid and supper is served in about 10-15 minutes.

for any wood burning fires, save the coals For later use. They will heat up quickly and gets very hot.
 
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