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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a quick question regarding dealing with money while living in the country. For those of you that live off the grid, or near-off grid, how do you come up with money when you need to buy "goods" in town to make life a little easier?

Where do people come up with money to purchase things like gasoline, bleach, spices, batteries, tools, etc? When the money runs out, how do you get more? Don't get me wrong, I know people can trade, but how much money can someone really make from the woods or living in the mountains?

Thanks in advance! :)
 

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There's a lot of different business you can run from your home. Everything from retail sales (even drop shipped if you don't want the hassles) to information based, or consulting, etc. Some people make a living from their skills, crafts, or even from their land itself.

I'm sort of in the same boat. I keep trying to come up with all the possibilities so that I can get out of the damned city again. I think it's wise to get such a business started before you move.
 

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stubborn old broad
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You will have to have a skill or trade that you practice, one that is in demand in the area in which you live or else make a living remotely, via the internet (which is still doable off-grid).

There is no difference from living in town, except that your needs for cash will be lower (possibly- you'll be astonished at how much capital can walk out the door when you're running your own homestead) and your level of material goods much more modest.

It is probably NOT possible to live cashless, unless you also are willing to live at an extremely primitive level.
 

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stubborn old broad
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Without offense, if the OP is at a skill level of asking how people make money "in the country", he is not going to be making a living at farming or stock-raising anytime soon.

Firewood is a possibility in the north, but its pretty unrealistic to assume any property a newbie finds affordable can deliver a cash crop before the savings run out.

Better to bring money-making skills with you, rather than assume you can develop something once "you're living on the land"
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great answers, thanks everyone. I guess I ask because I've lived in the city for the past 7-8 years, so I'm somewhat conditioned for providing skills required inside the city and I want to be able to make a transition outside of the city if I'm required to (if SHTF).

In the city you're talking spreadsheets, sales, computers, networking, knowledge of markets, etc. Outside of the city I believe you're looking at more hands-on skills such as construction, farming, mechanical work, etc.

Any suggestions on what the most universal skill in demand is? My guess is building/welding since that requires the most technical expertise and you can apply it to almost every aspect of sustaining life (shelter, food, clean water, etc).
 

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stubborn old broad
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OP, remember you're looking for PAID work. People "in the country" also use computers, need bookeepers and tax accountants, and plenty of other "city" services.

While it will be very useful personally to acquire basic welding or construction skills, you'll need training to get to a level you can work steadily at either. And frankly, LOTS of folks who farm and ranch already do their own welding and building construction.
What do you do NOW? Its probably your best bet to adapt the skills you already have (unless you don't really have any job skills at all).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Right now I'm a programmer and web developer. So it's 100% working with computers. But those skills don't really translate to hard times if something happens to the electric grid, the internet or the currency. And it's fairly easy for something to happen to at least one of those things. Having a fancy website might be a huge convenience to businesses now, but if the currency collapses I can't see many people looking for a graphic designer. Haha

In addition to everything computer related, I have some light mechanical, hunting, and fishing skills. So I'm not really concerned with general survival...I'm more concerned with thriving in a broken economic system and having a key skill to provide that I can trade with.
 

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You Already Have Many Job Skills To Barter

Some do as mentally recorded future favours owned to the helper. Sometimes the favour can be swapped around for other favours or help. We consider it just helping others and others then help us. Good neighbor and friend policy. Works for us.

A very short list would/may include....driving training, horse training, farming tips, armstrong labour help, (less of that nowadays) all sorts of instruction such as....teaching of all sorts. Home health care, house sitting, etc.. HB of CJ (old coot) (ex FF PM RN)

British spell check....cousins separated by a common spelt language. :)
 

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stubborn old broad
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Sorry, you said "Where do people come up with money to purchase things like gasoline, bleach, spices, batteries, tools, etc"

If the currency and economy actually collapses, how readily available will manufactured goods like bleach and batteries be? Are you planning to move "to the country" only after times get tough?

Clearly you need to expand on your "light" skills and make some of them robust, que no?
 

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Knowledge is Power
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Look into fulltime rv-ing. Many people are not retired but still work on the road and travel full time. Much of what they do could transfer to your situation. I would Google That train of thought for ideas as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey ZombieHoneyBadger, good point. My point wasn't about which specific items I'd purchase (bleach, spices, batteries, etc) but how I would make money to purchase whatever I needed. I can definitely agree that the items I mentioned give a romantic view of living in a rural setting :) But that said, the more access you have to any type of goods, the better. All you need is something trade-worthy to obtain what you want.

Also, if SHTF, then I plan on moving back to my hometown which is a fishing town in the Northeast. That way I would be surrounded by people I know and instantly have opportunities to work and trade safely.

ryck, I work a job too. What I had originally asked is how money is made while living off the country (when steady jobs aren't plentiful, such as after a currency collapse).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
HB of CJ, while I do agree that a friendly way of trade and offering services is to do favors for community members, it's not really a long term solution.

I'm the type of person that has always been self sufficient and pull my weight. I'd much prefer excel at something valuable to a community and be the one offering favors then depend on others to offer charity.
 

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4-America
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Do 20 years in the military. You can serve your country, save some money, and get a small retirement for cash needs like taxes. Maybe even learn some useful skills.
Quite right...but an average retirement from the military is $30K per year minimum with health care, commissary, PX, and other bennies . Along with learning a good skill, firearms qualifications and the GI Bill. Sweet. That'll do more than pay your taxes!
 

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I have a quick question regarding dealing with money while living in the country. For those of you that live off the grid, or near-off grid, how do you come up with money when you need to buy "goods" in town to make life a little easier?

Where do people come up with money to purchase things like gasoline, bleach, spices, batteries, tools, etc? When the money runs out, how do you get more? Don't get me wrong, I know people can trade, but how much money can someone really make from the woods or living in the mountains?

Thanks in advance! :)
There is a reason many folks live in the city. That's where most of the jobs are.

In rural areas you must either be a primary producer of rural goods (food, timber, etc) or someone who has a trade that supports those businesses. Plus because it is rural you will have a harder time if you duplicate someone else with that area trade and there is no call for that level of support. Rural towns are rarely a place you find two CPA's, if you get my drift.

Primary producers will need a lot of land to make a living. Support businesses must do their market research first to ensure there is enough demand in their area for services in that particular area.

As for folks that think they can just buy a small plot in the middle of nowhere and not already have a useful rural skill then I would say I hope you already are a well paid and successful writer, because you likely won't make a nickel playing outdoor sportsman.

I will say though that you can generally take most medical skills out rural. Outside of big cities the medical industry is desperate for trained people.
 
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