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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am always cautious when I use surplus military gear. I have a 1988 stick of military issue face paint that is identical to this one:



Is there anything toxic/cancerous in this paint?

Thank you!
Justin
 

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Veteran 11BC2/EOD
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I was sure the title was going to ask if it was safe to eat:)

My son ate some once, made him crap in technicolor for a few days, but he was fine. It makes me break out terribly, but that seems to be the same for everybody after a few weeks in the bush

Be carefull, the edges of the stick can cut you if you arent
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good advice about skin breaking out...I imagine it clogs pores like crazy? I still think it will be a good addition to my survival bag. It has one side with dark green and one side with white...is that for snow camo?


Thanks
Justin
 

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Eaglescout for Life
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If you put a light coating of baby oil on your face before you apply the faicepaint it comes off easy. Also, heating it with your lighter makes it go on much easier.
 

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Veteran 11BC2/EOD
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Honestly trying to figure out a need for it at all. Maybe someone will enlighten me on something I hadn't considered.
Because a human face and hands are the easiest things to identify in the field using decent optics.

3 parts of your body move the most and are easiest to see, face and 2 hands. If they are camoed, you MAY detect the movement, as your eye is drawn to it, but proper camo makes it very difficult to identify what you saw move.

Not to mention, a human face once identified is rarely something other than attached to a head and body. So a 8x8 section of skin gave your adversary a target, and its not the best target to show someone if its your face.

Get out in the bush, and off the net. Experiment, learn and adjust your gear. Personally I like the camo spandex face and headcover. It goes on fast, very effective and comes off quickly just in case you dont want to identified as the shooter on the grassy knoll........

Just puttin that out there
 

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Those seem like very good reasons, however I don't plan on bugging out or surviving in the bush. If I did though, I would definitely get some face paint, or if my plans changed
 

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Always Loaded
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After seeing the high price of camo face paint I found a alternative. After halloween, most store liquidate thier remaining stock for 50-90% off. This past year I filled a shopping bag with brown, black, and green .7 oz tubes of face paint for $.20 each. Sure beats $5 for a .3 oz container.
 

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After seeing the high price of camo face paint I found a alternative. After halloween, most store liquidate thier remaining stock for 50-90% off. This past year I filled a shopping bag with brown, black, and green .7 oz tubes of face paint for $.20 each. Sure beats $5 for a .3 oz container.
Those oil based paints are reflective. A large part of the purpose for camo is to eliminate skin shine.
 

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quiet one
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gave up on face paints a while ago. dirt, charcoal, grasses, and ash work wonderfully for me. no "unnatural" smell for hunting or being tracked.
 

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gave up on face paints a while ago. dirt, charcoal, grasses, and ash work wonderfully for me. no "unnatural" smell for hunting or being tracked.
You can mix the white ash with the black charcoal to make different shades. Use darker shades for the most convex outer parts and lighter shades for the concave parts of you face. This will help mute you facial details.

Mud will give you contrasting color and help break up your pattern to better blend in. Best thing is all these things are practically free.
 
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