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Prepared
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else in the upper-midwest looking at -40 to -60 windchills the next couple days? I kind of joke that all you need is plenty of ammo and beer.

Seriously, it's gotten me to wondering about living here in MN. When the outdoors itself is deadly within a few minutes of exposure, there's something wrong with living way up here. I've dug out my driveway, fueled up my cars, loaded up on groceries (it was busy at the stores).

And yet millions of us do it. If anyone's furnace goes out the next couple days, they're seriously screwed. I have a propane heater backup, winter mummy sleeping bags, etc. You really don't want your plumbing to freeze either, or your BOL becomes SOL.

Best of luck to the northerners & keep warm!
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Anyone else in the upper-midwest looking at -40 to -60 windchills the next couple days? I kind of joke that all you need is plenty of ammo and beer.

Seriously, it's gotten me to wondering about living here in MN. When the outdoors itself is deadly within a few minutes of exposure, there's something wrong with living way up here. I've dug out my driveway, fueled up my cars, loaded up on groceries (it was busy at the stores).

And yet millions of us do it. If anyone's furnace goes out the next couple days, they're seriously screwed. I have a propane heater backup, winter mummy sleeping bags, etc. You really don't want your plumbing to freeze either, or your BOL becomes SOL.

Best of luck to the northerners & keep warm!
I grew up on a farm in North central Iowa, in the 1960s and 70s. I raised my own livestock when Iowa had a very cold, very snowy climate. So when I graduated engineering school in 1982, I took the job offer in southern California, and when I retired, I moved to the Ozark mtns
Some folks enjoy living in very cold, deep snow places. Places where livestock must have a heated shelter barn and heated water tanks located in the barn. I've had my fill of that ****.
You might consider moving further south. South of Des Moines is pretty nice, South of Kansas city is distinctly warmer, and I live closer to ft Smith.
 

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reluctant sinner
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It was that cold in a German winter and I watched the antenna guy lines strip flesh on my hands. I couldn't get enough grip with gloves on, that was the day I said enough of the US Army.
 

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I grew up on a farm in North central Iowa, in the 1960s and 70s. I raised my own livestock when Iowa had a very cold, very snowy climate. So when I graduated engineering school in 1982, I took the job offer in southern California, and when I retired, I moved to the Ozark mtns
Some folks enjoy living in very cold, deep snow places. Places where livestock must have a heated shelter barn and heated water tanks located in the barn. I've had my fill of that ****.
You might consider moving further south. South of Des Moines is pretty nice, South of Kansas city is distinctly warmer, and I live closer to ft Smith.
There are no mountains here in the Ozarks. When I lived in So Cal I lived on a "hill" at 4,500 feet.

Now on the Springfield Plateau I am at around 1,250 feet. The highest point of elevation in Missouri is around 1,775 feet not far from here.

Tonight low is 6°
I know that is not crazy low, but it is cold enough. Tomorrow high 16° and low 12°
I am definately not here because of great weather. I am here for maximum freedom.
 

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I've thought about that many times, and I chose to avoid places which get too old during winter, or too hot during summer. I don't want to break my back shoveling snow, or carrying wood to the fireplace. As I'm getting old, I moved to a place with nicer weather. I had more land when I was back North, but it's a choice.
 

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Fenced In
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I went to tech college in Alexandria, MN in the mid `90s, and recall one morning hearing on the radio ". . . and the coldest point in North America is Alexandria, MN." I was driving an old VW Rabbit at the time, and my roommate had a similarly old Suburban, and we took turns going out to run the vehicles during the night. We both had early classes, so we drove in a two-vehicle convoy to make sure we both got to school intact, well before sunrise.

Naturally, the college - which never closed due to weather - cancelled classes that day.

In any case, I still live in MN, despite the conditions. If anything, the humid summers are worse than the winters in my opinion. I have enough cold weather gear to last a couple of lifetimes, so my greatest concern is generally the horrible drivers I have to share the road with after fresh snowfall.
 

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There is a book titled Invasion about China detonating an EMP the night before a major storm just like this to hit. It's a kitchy story but makes you think about how the country would fare if the power was out in all these places. My area would be a frozen wasteland with prob half dead due to having only electric heat.

Storm lasts 5 days, third of the people dead, gangs looting in FL.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The other problem with the cold here, like someone mentioned, is the bad drivers. People who've not grown up in these conditions, poorly maintained roads, and road rage. I see alot of people either plugging along at a snail's pace, or zipping along at even higher than normal speed. Both extremes cause accidents and slowdowns.

I don't mind just plain sub-zero weather so much as high wind gusts. It's the wind that really seems to go right through you, blowing snow in your face, reducing visibility. It's going to feel like Mt. Everest out there the next 24-36 hours.

When I took out the snowblower the other day, I used a US military extreme cold weather hood. Snorkel opening with fur, under-arm straps to keep it anchored on your body. It did the trick.
 

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Just west of the Red River from you. It was -36 last time I went outside. It's crowding -50 with the windchill. I'd hate to be a coyote or a whitetail tonight.
 

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On a positive note, the murder rate in Chicago should be down considerably the next few days. The homeboys don't like it when it's that cold.

Parts of the world that are warmer than Chicago at 2200Hrs MST:

- Anchorage - 33F
- Basel, Switzerland - 33F
- Bonn, Germany - 31F
- Prague - 26F
- Oslo, Norway - 10F
- Vladivostok - 40F
- Stockholm - 22F
- Fairbanks - 13F
 

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Southern IN here... current wind chill -20F.

Most HVAC systems in the area are struggling to cope as they are designed around a low working temp of 0F. Most schools are closed and some businesses.

We stay prepped for winter weather though. Wife always has extra clothes and blankets in her car for her and the kids... same for me in the truck. We heat with wood and just installed a TSC special pellet stove to supplement. Had both rolling last night and the house was at a toasty 76F. Put the circulation blower on the HVAC system on a timer to keep pipes from freezing.

Work sucks but I got the cold gear out and we're doing good. Stay warm alls!
 

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On a positive note, the murder rate in Chicago should be down considerably the next few days. The homeboys don't like it when it's that cold.

Parts of the world that are warmer than Chicago at 2200Hrs MST:

- Anchorage - 33F
- Basel, Switzerland - 33F
- Bonn, Germany - 31F
- Prague - 26F
- Oslo, Norway - 10F
- Vladivostok - 40F
- Stockholm - 22F
- Fairbanks - 13F
Minneapolis, MN temps are tracking along with Mount Everest in the 8000-8850 m range.
 

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Anyone else in the upper-midwest looking at -40 to -60 windchills the next couple days? I kind of joke that all you need is plenty of ammo and beer.

Seriously, it's gotten me to wondering about living here in MN. When the outdoors itself is deadly within a few minutes of exposure, there's something wrong with living way up here. I've dug out my driveway, fueled up my cars, loaded up on groceries (it was busy at the stores).

And yet millions of us do it. If anyone's furnace goes out the next couple days, they're seriously screwed. I have a propane heater backup, winter mummy sleeping bags, etc. You really don't want your plumbing to freeze either, or your BOL becomes SOL.

Best of luck to the northerners & keep warm!

-29F actual temp(not wind chill)here this morning and a questionable furnace. It has a cracked heat exchanger and are hoping to get it replaced tomorrow or Monday. For safety reasons we don't run it at night, the kitchen (where the thermostat is) was 38 degrees at 5:30 this morning. The rest of the house is better insulates to it was probably in the 40's.

We knew the cold weather was coming and knew we wouldn't have the new furnace put in by then so we made sure we were ready for it. 20 gallons of kerosene and two hundred pounds of propane and several electric heaters. We also bought two more CO detectors because of the cracked heat exchanger and using invented heaters.

One pound of propane will last about 1 1/2 hours with the heater on low or 45 minutes with it on high. A gallon of kerosene lasts about 9 hours. So we should have 180 hours worth of kerosene and150-220 hours of propane. At which point we should have a running furnace and the weather will be 50 degrees warmer and in that time we will be able to buy more of both.

A near by town has the same temps but they also have a power outage, they are handling it by turning the churches into warming centers or going to where there is electric.

The way my house is laid out we need to keep the entire house above freezing. One end of the house has the plumbing in it and the very other end has specialized tools with very small water lines in it that if they were to freeze would do $50,000 worth of damage. If the house were better laid out I would only worry about heating a room or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Furnace has been running quite a bit. It's warmed up to -32 wind chill, so I might run some local errands -- if shops are open. My workplace and son's high school are closed. His school has been closed all week, and tomorrow also. The Post Office cancelled mail delivery today.

Local meteorologists explained that the old-style wind chill computation was revised in 2001. So what I remembered as something like -60 as a kid might be only -48 today, depending on how much was wind vs. temp. Doesn't really matter at those temps, though.

Some say that there was a blast of Moroccan heat last month that made its way north, causing the usual polar vortex (over the Arctic) to split apart, and one big section came our way. I hope this doesn't happen very often...
 
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