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Super Moderator wearing a Cape
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Greetings fellow survivalists,

Once again I have the privilege of announcing a new contest here at SurvivalistBoards

The Setup:

A short time ago, the moderator team was contacted by one of our long term members who wanted to share some good fortune with the membership by sponsoring a giveaway.

As before, this contest is not sponsored, endorsed or otherwise affiliated with Vertical Scope, Second Media, or any of the various owners, advertisers, and what have you.

The Contest:

Since it is Memorial Day we ask the question: Who are you remembering?

The Rules:
  • 1. Due to international shipping restrictions and varying laws in foreign countries, we cannot ship overseas at this time so unfortunately the contests are only open to individuals that have shipping addresses in the US or Canada.
  • 2. The chosen winner will need to provide a Name and a Shipping Address in the US or Canada to the Mod team (via PM). We will not share this with anyone outside of our team.
  • 3. One entry per individual per contest.
    4. The contest thread is for actual entries only, general comments will be removed.
  • 5. All regular forum rules apply.
  • 6. Failure to follow the rules will result in forfeiture of entry into the contest.
The Prize:

Wood Rectangle Netbook Font Automotive exterior


Wood Tool Bicycle part Blade Knife


Ontario Knives SP-2 Survival Knife: The SPEC PLUS products are a diverse mix of top-selling and innovative knife and tool patterns designed for military, sporting and first responder purposes. Each knife in the SPEC PLUS series features a comfortable Kraton® handle, epoxy textured powder coated 1075 carbon steel blades, full tang construction and a tactical sheath.

BLADE COLOR: Black
BLADE FINISH: Powder Coat
BLADE GRIND: Flat Bevel w/ Swedge
BLADE LENGTH: 5.5 in (14.0 cm)
BLADE MATERIAL: 1075 Carbon Steel
BLADE THICKNESS: 0.188 in (0.478 cm)
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: USA
EDGE TYPE: Plain
HANDLE COLOR: Black
HANDLE MATERIAL: Molded Plastic
HARDNESS: 57-59 HRC
LOCK TYPE: Fixed
OVERALL LENGTH: 10.6 in (26.9 cm)
SHEATH COLOR: Black
SHEATH MATERIAL: Leather Cordura®
SHEATH TYPE: Belt Loop
Weight: 0.95 (Lbs)


The Deadline:

This contest will run today only (Memorial Day 2022) and will conclude at 8pm CST
All entries must be posted prior to 8pm CST
Drawing and announcement of the winner will follow.
 

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Forum Administrator
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I am remembering some Uncles and 6 friends I served with. I joke around a lot but, this day always brings me sorrow, gratitude and earnest reflection. To be honest, this is the holiday that hits me the hardest, every year.
(While it is allowed for me to enter this, I recuse myself so someone else will win. I just wanted to share. )
 

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My buddy Dave Saxon. I had the honor of being roomies with him for a year in Ft Hood. After Ft. Hood, Dave went to Desert Storm, then ETS'd. He later went back in and went to Afghanistan. He saw too much. A few years ago after much struggle, he finally succumbed to the effects of PTSD. I will spare you the details. RIP Dave. I still lose it thinking about him and tomorrow I will be a wreck when I hear Taps play, as I always do. Scouts out brother.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
Very Prepared!!
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55,346 Posts
If not for the Founding Fathers we wouldn't have a nation to fight for and a Memorial Day to remember all of those brave souls who put their lives on the line to make America one of the greatest nations in human history. So I remember the Founding Fathers of this great nation of the united States of America.

Fortunately, none of my immediate family members ever died in battle but most of the men in my family served. I'd like to remember my father (now deceased) and his brothers for serving in WWII. My dad was a Master Sergeant who served on the front line in communications. I'd like to remember my oldest brother (now deceased) who was a Russian interpreter during the Cold War during the Vietnam era. I'd like to remember my other brother who served two tours in Vietnam. He called himself a frontline grunt.

I'd especially like to thank all of those men who overcame fear in light of horrendous danger who fought with true valor, integrity, and pure grit.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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So many memories and stories from family growing up with first hand remembrances about WW2 and others as well as passed down stories from colonial times. Many told and retold over the years on this day with different reflections. Some times it was told with a smile as they remembered friends others it became somber, voices faded and became quiet with heads dropping and silent tears. These stories are shouldered and masked but seen.

I have 2 personal flag cases that get cleaned today, my uncle the keeper has over a dozen family flags, and more are with other members.

There are too many hero's that deserve honoring today to limit it to family stories. So today I do my best with personal reflections beer and BBQ thank you and welcome to come share my backyard.

This day has started to become a bit somber for me so cheers and its time to fire up the smoker

Road surface Line Cemetery Grave Grass
 

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Who am I remembering? All of them. Every single member of our armed forces and those supporting them who lost their lives in defense of our country, whether during war or peacetime.

The well-known heroes and those who died with no fanfare. Each one in their own way helped to establish and maintain the greatest nation, and they have my thanks and appreciation.
 

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reluctant sinner
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20,436 Posts
I'm remembering my dad. He was the last of 5 brothers drafted for WWII. After basic the army wanted to make him him a telephone operator - he told the guy - you will never get a good one. He was a watch maker for over 10 years when drafted so they made him an instrument repair man. In England with the 8th Air Force he worked on mostly B-17. He and his buddy came up with a new plan for calibrating the auto-pilot using 5V instead of 50 that made them more accurate. I have the pair of stainless steel watch tweezers he made from the emergency windshield release pins as found on a B-24. He sent my mom a lot of money he earned by fixing watches and soldering the lids back on Ronson lighters. I have the blow pipe and alcohol candle he used for that task.
 

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I will start with many of my family who came here in the mid 1700s and fought for freedom on the Frontier, and Eastern Mountains. A great uncle who road with Teddy. Then on to my Paternal and Maternal grandfathers both of WW1. to my father the only son who volunteered in WW2. 2 uncles who lost their lives in Korea. an older brother who stood many hours on a check point in Germany. To my time I remember the 58k+ that did not come home, 4 of my high school mates are on the wall, and the many 1000s that are home in body but not mind. The many B-52 air crews that I watch leave every day that lost their lives, and MOST of all the 22 a day that we lose, for lack of proper mental health, and this includes those of storm 1 and 2 and the mid-east conflicts.
Call sign
Bounder
USAF Retired

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I am remembering my grandpa "Pop's", gassed in WW1. I spent far more time with him growing up than with my dad. He had multiple trips to the VA where he would spend weeks to months (lung damage). I learned to roam the hills with him, his dog, and his rifle; I learned that you can do what you can do, and can't do what you can't but you have to push to find what your limits are (he was never supposed to be released from the VA hospital); he taught me pipe fitting as a trade, and many many of the skills needed around a small place in the country. He helped me (learning as I did) rebuild a small Honda 90 when I was 14, so I had my own transportation on my 15th birthday. He died of pancreatic cancer (assumed due to the gas damage) when I was in basic training. A large (OLD!) oval picture of him in his uniform hangs on my wall and has a small spotlight to highlight it when company comes over.
 

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Since the prize is a knife, my grandpa is the one I remember. He was the kindest soul you would have ever met and served in WWII. He told them when he enlisted he didn’t want to carry a gun because he could never kill another man but wanted to serve anyway. They assigned him as a medic/ambulance driver in the European theatre in the front lines. He survived, and retired a farmer after raising a very large family. Never once did he talk about the war. Without compromise he lived his life and served others. Miss him dearly.
 

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My Great-Great Grandfather, Eldridge Riley was in the 54th North Carolina and served under "Stonewall" Jackson but was later captured at the battle of Rappahannock Station. He survived the war, his brother Stephen was killed at Gettysburg and his other brother, Judson died at Elmira NY prison camp. I have been to Judson's grave. I had 8 Great Uncles in WW2, all in the Navy, all survived. No one desires peace more than a Vet...
 

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I remember my father, who came back from his service in Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, like many other vets not knowing the Department of Defense gave him a little present thanks to Operation Ranch Hand (Only You can prevent forests) in the form of Agent Orange. He died an very uncomfortable death from multiple forms of cancer. My mother suffered tremendously, enjoying the thanks of a grateful nation our politicians as so quick to talk about and slow to do anything about.
It is a solemn day of Remebrance for me, to reflect on All the sacrifices by all those brave men and women who preceded us.
I don't wish to participate in any giveaway, just want to honor the fallen....
 

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Wildlife Proctologist
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I put flowers on the graves of relatives the day before Memorial Day. It’s good to remember them and make the headstones look good. But today is saved for remembering brothers I served with that are gone as well as the others who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

I am remembering several people specifically. First is my best friend from years ago. We were young Soldiers together, plus we were roommates and did two schools together. He killed himself and it still haunts me. I’m laughing at funny memories and tears a rolling at the same time. That was back in the early 90s before suicides from Soldiers was more common like it is today. The next is a good friend who died on our second deployment together. I knew his wife and kids well. More funny memories and more tears.

I lost two others in Iraq and of course am remembering them but not able to visit their graves. Also thinking of others I’ve served with that have died, some from accidents and others from not being able to cope after coming home. May all who have died in service to our country rest in peace.
 

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Super Moderator
Psalm 34:4
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Not entering the give away, just remembering my 3 grandfathers, one KIA in WWII that I never got to meet, grandmother remarried another WWII vet who was a tank commander in Africa, he raised his kids, her kids and all 18 of us grandkids as if we were all his own, passed away of old age nearly 35 years ago, and grandfather 3 was a grunt that ended up being an MP in France during WWII he died of old age on Memorial Day 25 years ago... also thinking of several uncles and cousins that served, one uncle in particular served in Vietnam, came home and had a good life raising his kids until he got leukemia from the agent orange he was exposed to, the war took it's time but got him anyway in the end. His son served in Iraq and just recently passed from a heart attack.

God bless all who served and the families left behind of those that did not get to come home.
 

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Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum
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I'm remembering my grandfather. He was a machine gunner in WWII against the Japanese in India. One of the stories I remember is that he told me that his platoon had been fighting for about 72 hours straight. He was in his machine gun nest with his platoon Sgt and something in him just snapped. He jumped over the sand bags and started to charge at the enemy. His platoon Sgt jumped over and tackled him while they were taking heavy fire. His platoon Sgt got him calmed down and back to the safety of the machine gun nest. It turns out that my grandfather had suffered from what is known as shell shock. Had it not been for his platoon Sgt, I would not be here today. So I'm grateful for his platoon Sgt. Unfortunately my grandfather passed away at age 98 in 2020. I really miss him. For many years, he was the only male influence in my life and I really enjoyed spending time with him.
 

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Thank you to those who gave all and their families.
My family has always been very "Patriotic". I remember vividly as a little boy marching through town to the Veterans cemetery in the Memorial day parade with the local American Legion post members, my Dad and Grandfathers. When my little kid legs got tired, my throat dry and I started to whine like a little kid will do, Grandfather squeezed my hand saying, "Keep walking boy, you can make it. These men here have walked a lot farther and there are plenty who didn't come home who'd be glad to be walking right now". Of course I really didn't understand, as "war" to me was a far off concept and was just something we played at until the street lights came on and it was time for dinner, where in "the dead" would be suddenly revived to fight another day.
We have a long and proud line of service in our family back to the revolution with sacrifices that were mentioned but never really talked about. When it was my turn to hold the line, I watched others make the ultimate sacrifice which still eats at me as I had sworn to not only fight with them but provide for their medical well being. Many times my Grandfathers words came back to me, "Keep walking boy...".
Returning home I gained a new understanding that Grandfather was a POW and lost two brothers in WWII, my Uncle never knew his father (who died in WWII), my Aunt's brother died in Viet Nam all of which I had previously only had vague knowledge of. Clearly that knowledge was there and obviously some of that was more painful than what folks wanted to talk about but the reality was/is, untold numbers of service Men and Women and their families have made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms. Our family's was no greater than theirs. So today I honor those who sacrificed.

All gave some and some gave all, sums it up well for me.
 

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My Papa and Great uncles who fought their way up to Bastogne with Patton. My cousin Bud who died during Tet in Vietnam just before I was born. My Brother Anthony Bottelo from Wilburton Oklahoma , we went to Boot Camp together he was killed in Somalia. And I don't think I can name them all right now. RIP Brothers! & S/FI!
 
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