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The last few years I've been learning to fix things.My car has a mix of metric and sae.
I know it just depends,but what do you think the most common sizes you use...say the top 5 or 10.
I have a "full" set of tools in the trunk/garage..but hate lugging them out or running back and forth to find the right size.

Would like a smaller box with the rachet,extension,and a hand full of sockets that covers a lot of situations..if it dosen't fit,at least I have a general idea of the next size to grab.
 

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8mm an 10mm for battery. US makes 1/2",9/16" and 5/8". Metrics 13mm, 15mm, 17mm and 19mm.

A set of small , medium and lager adjustable wrenches and a small pipe wrench would be a great addition to these ifn you are making a small box.

A complete set would is best.
 

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10, 11, 13, 14, 15 and 17 mm will cover 95% of metric and some of these interchange with SAE sizes - also 19mm swaps with 3/4"
a good quality 1/4" and 3/8" drive rachet set combination SAE and metric sizes, a swivel, short and long extensions will get you through 95% of your needs.
You left out 5/16(8mm) and 7mm is very common on chevy. 12mm is common on those cars he listed as well. None od the ones you listed cross well with standard sizes. 5/16 crosses well with 8mm, 5/8 crosses well with 16mm, 13/16 crosses well with 21mm. I disagree with your assessment that a good 1/4 and 3/8 set will cover 95% of his needs. How will you get the wheels off? You will break a 3/8 ratchet if you try that.

Listen, there is a reason we mechanics have giant tool boxes stuffed with tools. It isn't because we love the snap-on man. IMO, you need 1/4-1 1/4 inch wrenches, 4mm-24mm wrenches(combination wrenches); 1/4-1 inch and 4mm-32mm sockets in all 3 common drives(1/4, 3/8.1/2); You need a good set of screw drivers flat, phillips, torx, and posi(phillips will some times work woth posi and posi sometimes with phillips BUT not always). You need a wide variety of pliers. Side cutters, channel locks, needle nose and others. You need at least 1 good hammer; 2lb ballpeen is a decent compromise but you will suffer if it is your only hammer. I don't know what all you want to do, but the above list isn't even a good start.
 

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I know you specifically asked about common sizes, bot I found these complete sets to be small enough to allow you to grab and go and have it all(as far as sockets). For the average Joe, I think you'd be hard pressed to find a better deal. Good quality and no filler pieces. Best part IMO, is the molded cases. Compact and tough, everything stays put even when tipped over. Think shipping is extra, but you may find this deal on other tool sites that include it.

http://www.ntxtools.com/network-tool-warehouse/KDT-80550F.html
 

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Agree 100%.
Tools are an area that you need to make special accommodations for if need be. Having only certain obviously common size tools will get you into a deeper hole than if you didn't have tools at all. If you spend three hours taking something apart and get to a part that can ONLY be accessed by a 12 mm box wrench, you'll likely be worse off than if you never bothered taking it apart at all.
Then there's the bolts that need a wrench on both sides, and an adjustable won't fit. You can use a socket on one side, but only if you have a socket with you.

Here's an excellent box that will organize things well, you'll see with a glance if you forgot to put something back, and if you set it up right it will make life a lot easier for you.

http://m.northerntool.com/categories/shop~tools~category_storage-organizers+tool-boxes-chests+montezuma/products?hotline=false

Might be able to find them used for cheaper money, but having set up several mobile repair trucks over the years, I vote there isn't a better way to set up a tool set for a shtf situation.
I would even suggest some sort of impact driver for really tight fasteners, an electric will suffice for most jobs.
 

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Agree 100%.
Tools are an area that you need to make special accommodations for if need be. Having only certain obviously common size tools will get you into a deeper hole than if you didn't have tools at all. If you spend three hours taking something apart and get to a part that can ONLY be accessed by a 12 mm box wrench, you'll likely be worse off than if you never bothered taking it apart at all.
Then there's the bolts that need a wrench on both sides, and an adjustable won't fit. You can use a socket on one side, but only if you have a socket with you.

Here's an excellent box that will organize things well, you'll see with a glance if you forgot to put something back, and if you set it up right it will make life a lot easier for you.

http://m.northerntool.com/categorie...boxes-chests+montezuma/products?hotline=false

Might be able to find them used for cheaper money, but having set up several mobile repair trucks over the years, I vote there isn't a better way to set up a tool set for a shtf situation.
I would even suggest some sort of impact driver for really tight fasteners, an electric will suffice for most jobs.
Your link didn't lead to a specific tool box for me. Could you provide another link?

I agree that sockets alone are not likely to suffice for most repair jobs. Wrenches, pliers, screwdrivers, etc. will probably be needed. Not having a garage, having to depend on "portable" tool boxes to hold my tools and having for years trying to keep sockets organized using rails and trays...I finally gave up. I went socket sets in cases that actually hold the pieces securely and an individual tool bag to hold everything else. Much happier and much less frustrated since doing so. YMMV
 

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http://m.ebay.com/itm/135-PC-Piece-...%3A9ecd9ec715a0a2ab961688a3fffdef3f%7Ciid%3A4


I was a auto large truck mechanic,15 yrs, this set looks like a good start, may be a little bigger than you want, they have smaller ones check amazon or ebay they have deals, of course you get what you pay for, if you buy cheap tools do not expect them to tackle hard jobs, like a 20 yr old rusted engine bolt, usually the cheap wrench breaks befor the bolt, or your knuckles suffer.
 

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$50-$60 can get you near every size you'll need in wrenches and sockets if you buy cheap. I keep a full set in my truck and another at a remote cabin.

When I first started turning wrenches in the 50s, there was US, Metric, and Whitworth. Also, metric often came in full and half sizes like a 5.5 mm, 6.5 mm, etc. Then they were left out of sets but at least all the full sizes were there. Now many sets even leave out important full sizes like 9 mm, 18 mm, 20 mm, etc.

I wish the heck the US had either stayed with US sizing, or fully gone to metric (like was supposed to happen but never did). I think Ford was the first US auto-maker to color code all the hardware and anything blue was metric (first Pintos). No such thing anymore.

I was just working on a Chevy Astro van and 13 mm and 15 mm bolt heads are the most common. I also have 78 and a 88 Toyota trucks in my shop and no 13 mm anywhere. Lots of 12mm 14 mm, and 17 mm.
 

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I've been putting together a tool set to give my son the he buys his first house. Among these tools are wrench and socket sets. Eventually the set should include 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" drive sets with both regular and deep sockets.

I recently found on sale at Sears, 22 piece Craftsman combination wrench sets in either metric or SAE. At about $25 a set, I bought him one of each. Sears has some great sales occasionally. I also picked up an 11 piece 1/4" drive set in Metric for $12 and matching one in SAE for $13.

Although most of the Craftsman line is now made in China they still seem to be of decent quality and still carry a Lifetime Warrantee (for as long a Sears is in business!).
 

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I've been putting together a tool set to give my son the he buys his first house. Among these tools are wrench and socket sets. Eventually the set should include 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" drive sets with both regular and deep sockets.

I recently found on sale at Sears, 22 piece Craftsman combination wrench sets in either metric or SAE. At about $25 a set, I bought him one of each. Sears has some great sales occasionally. I also picked up an 11 piece 1/4" drive set in Metric for $12 and matching one in SAE for $13.

Although most of the Craftsman line is now made in China they still seem to be of decent quality and still carry a Lifetime Warrantee (for as long a Sears is in business!).
Craftsman brand was sold to Stanley recently, Sears should have some clearance sales.

The 62 piece Metrinch set should cover most needs, add a HF screwdriver set, small crowbar, a couple pair of plyers, and a hammer'll give you a decent starter set. (it's what I keep in the trunk, everything else is at home)
 

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I worked as a proff. mechanic for over 40 years. Used to be I'd only have name brands in my box like Williams, Bonney, Utica Tool. Snap On, Mac, S. K. Wayne, etc. Now? I am amazed at the high quality of some of the cheap tools from China.

Local K-Mart here went out of business recently and they had some Craftsman tools on sale. I bought a 1/4" socket and rachet set and I was skeptical off. Called "Universal" sockets that fit hex heads, spline heads, square heads, etc. I paid $22 and now wish I'd bought more at that price. Excellent quality and they work great. Besides regular work on hex-head bolts, they come in real handy turning square-headed taps.
 

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Your link didn't lead to a specific tool box for me. Could you provide another link?

I agree that sockets alone are not likely to suffice for most repair jobs. Wrenches, pliers, screwdrivers, etc. will probably be needed. Not having a garage, having to depend on "portable" tool boxes to hold my tools and having for years trying to keep sockets organized using rails and trays...I finally gave up. I went socket sets in cases that actually hold the pieces securely and an individual tool bag to hold everything else. Much happier and much less frustrated since doing so. YMMV
Hopefully this one will work. You'll have to paste it in your browser, I'm responding from my phone and I can't figure how to do proper links.
If it doesn't work, Google Montezuma Toolboxes and look at the one with the slanted cover.
I used to loose tools and since I switched to those I don't. I can see at a glance what I forgot to put away.
Nice set up
 

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You will always need at least the one size you didn't bring....as well as a back wrench.

Some sick engineer designed stuff,... so that no human can see and reach it,.. unless you have another articulating arm growing out of the middle your forehead.

I carry full sets...plus specially tools I have used over the years.

If you want to cut that down...decide what you feel comfortable fixing...brings sizes to that fit that....then add as needed.
 

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Have a cut down set is hard to do unless you have specific jobs you want to do.

For many years worked as a service tech on HVAC....
Mosty carried a "roof bag"......that was just the most used tools.
That handled 90 percent of what was necessary to do the job.

That bag was the result of years of trying to arrive at that point.

The point is......what will you be working on that you would want tools for.

My trucks carry swivel breaker bar...short extension and 17" and 19 MM sockets.
That and a rather large screwdriver/ rubber mallet/hammer... does wheels.

Needle nose pliers, (Fuses) side cutters, (wire ties) vice grips, channel locks (holding hanging on to stuff) and 1-1/8 open end/box end wrench...(hitch ball)
Combination screwdriver w/bits.

3/8-/7/16 open combo 1/2-9/16 open combo....battery.

That's about it....
Troble light
 

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Always seem to need a 10mm to remove shrouds or covers to get at stuff that needs to be fixed and of course 10mm is always the size that I am somehow missing. I paid more for individual sockets than I have on my sets. Crescent wrenches and vise grips are always in the vehicle also. Oh and I tend to stay away from Craftsman ratchets. I've had more of those break than any other. Stripped gears or handles snapping in half. As to the replacements given it was rebuild kits that I had to do myself and afterwards is when the handles would snap.
 
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