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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Marlin Firearms to close in North Haven
Published: Friday, March 26, 2010

By Ann DeMatteo, Assistant Metro Editor

NORTH HAVEN — The Marlin Firearms Co., one of the town’s top taxpayers, will start to lay off employees in May and will close by June 2011.

The gun manufacturer’s employees were told Thursday that the jobs of 265 salaried and hourly workers would be eliminated over 18 months. Marlin traces its history back to 1870.

Marlin officials could not be reached for comment, but First Selectman Michael J. Freda heard the news from a company official Thursday evening.

Freda said several factors appear to be driving the closure, from the cost of doing business in Connecticut to wage differentials.

“The situation appears to be compounded by the fact that Connecticut is a difficult state for any manufacturer to sustain its business model,” Freda said after meeting with the company official.

Freda said he asked whether the services Marlin was providing would be moved, but was told that was undetermined.

State and federal officials also were contacted Thursday, according to Freda.

The Remington Arms Co. bought Marlin in late 2007. Marlin is on Kenna Drive, off Bailey Road. Remington is a North Carolina affiliate that falls under the umbrella of the Freedom Group, one of the largest manufacturers of firearms and ammunition in the world, according to its Web site.

No layoffs or closures were anticipated at the time of the $41.7 million sale.

The firearms manufacturer should not be confused with The Marlin Co., a business-to-business Internet and print publication service that operated at the plant until late 2007. Now in Wallingford because it needed more space, that company employs 120 people.

The chairman and president of The Marlin Co. is Frank Kenna III, whose grandfather, the late Frank Kenna Sr., bought Marlin Firearms at auction in 1924 when it was bankrupt. Marlin Firearms was started by John Marlin.

“I’m sure for the employees, it’s devastating,” Kenna said of the closure. “I still know a lot of them, and all I can say is I’m very sympathetic to them. It’s a tough blow.”

But, Kenna said the rifle and shotgun industry has changed over the years. “What’s happening in the industry is it’s consolidating and there are fewer and fewer individual firearms companies. The culture has changed.

“When we sold we were producing half of the number of rifles that we were in the early 1970s,” he said.

The news that Marlin will be closing comes at a bad time for North Haven, which has a $6.6 million revenue gap going into the next fiscal year.

“The timing of this news is very unfortunate as we are preparing for our upcoming budget,” Freda said.

As a result, his efforts to generate economic development in town, possibly with incremental tax financing to attract new businesses, “will be kicking into higher gear.”

Freda said he will be doing his best to urge local Marlin officials to arrange a meeting for him with the parent company.

“I would like to meet with the parent company in an effort to see if there’s any way to keep them here,” said Freda. “I can’t accept it without making an attempt,” he added.

How much tax revenue the town receives from the company annually was not immediately available. On the 2009 grand list, Marlin was ranked No. 14.

Contact Ann DeMatteo at 203-789-5716 or [email protected].
Source: http://nhregister.com/articles/2010/03/26/news/metro/a1_--_marlin_0326.txt
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trickle Down Economics:
One of Town's LARGEST Tax Payers Closes Down + documented $6.6 Million "Revenue Gap" + undocumented/unknown pension deficit = one of two things...

1) Town of North Haven will be substantially cutting back on "essential services" (Won't bet on it).

or

2) Residents of North Haven about to be bent over and spread WIDE with more Tax increases.
 

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Who Watches the Watchmen?
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This sucks! i guess this is the hope and change everyone was screaming about last election. No other gun companies better tank on me. lol
 

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keep your powder dry
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Well, this automatically made my Friday a ****ty day. :(

My last rifle (a bolt-action 925) was a Marlin.

Where are all the CAS shooters going to go for their lever-actions?

Think I may have to pick up a blued model 795 .22lr (its got a $25 rebate till 2011). Theyre dirt cheap and good guns Ive heard.
 

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Did they offically stop making guns there already? I would love to get one of the last one made there. Preferably a 24" stainless XLR or maybe a 45-70 or 444 model. Heck I want one of everything they make. Everything I bought from them has been 100% reliable and a shooter too.

Was planning on getting a Stevens 200 at their westfield place IF they did that. Might want to take a visit to the marlin factory this year.
 

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Sam Adams was right....
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damn.... that's sad... Marlin is a legendary gun maker....
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I drive by the Marlin plant everyday on my way to and from work. Now it'll be just another empty building along the I-91 wasteland.

This is only one example of a old company being unable to continue operations in the current economic environment. These situations of these very old companies, long rooted in the local economies (Marlin has been around since 1870!), finally closing their doors are the best indication we have that THERE IS NO RECOVERY JUST AROUND THE CORNER, despite what the cnbc a**holes want us to believe about "green shoots", new money going into the market, etc. It's all b**sh*t folks.

Those 265 people losing their jobs all pay taxes. Federal, local, (and in CT, state income taxes). I know some of them personally. Multiply this one example by the hundreds, thousands, and you have a giant dirty economic snowball that is still rolling along down the hill, gathering speed, getting bigger and bigger... Eventually it will have to crash into a wall or it will disintegrate on it's own; just based on it's sheer size. Heaven help us when it does...
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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I just happen to be nearing the end of the book Atlas Shrugged. The similarities between this book, written in 1950, and today's enviornment are scary.
 

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I called the company, they do not have a showroom in New Haven. I always thought the 336 marlin was too good to be true in price. I paid $350 for mine new w/ cheapie scope.

Are Marlin 60's made in New Haven? I need to replace a lousy shooting henry 22lr lever gun.
 

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Trust but verify
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I agree- it’s very sad indeed to lose another Great American firearms manufacturer due to hard economic times, state inhospitalities, current public opinions, or changing marketing environments.

My first deer gun was a Marlin lever action. My son espouses Marlin as a fine manufacturer as I do. Marlin’s simplicity, ruggedness and quality works today as it did for 19th century cowboys and frontiersmen.

I am aware too that the gun industry are adapting to soldiers returning home to hunt with AR type platforms that they were trained on. It’s actually pretty smart to adapt AR caliber 223 to anything else out there for hunting. At the same time it educates the gun stupid public that AR’s are really not scary and fire only one shot each time you pull the trigger. Why not hunt with them. Maybe Marlin should build ARs to survive unfortunately. I still see a lot of Lever Marlin’s in hunting guides scabbards on their horses, not AR’s however. Marlins are reliable. Times are changing…

Other legendary American / Great Old-west manufacturers are gone already, or transferred to the Japanese like Remington and Winchester. S&W supposedly became a Japanese company but has been acquired back American I am told. I can hand it to Japan machining perfectiveness; but these are American Heritage Icons to me. Just doesn’t seem the same somehow.

It’s not the right thing for our government to bail out and run companies, but I bet you won’t see President Obama help Marlin anytime soon. North Haven, Connecticut should do everything they can if to keep this historical state ICON alive. North Haven use to be the cradle of a lot strong manufacturing.
I sincerely hope Marlin can turn things around for themselves. I don’t want Marlin to go away or become foreign.
 
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