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90/10 headed for 95/5
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I'm not an expert, but from what I've seen in the Quebec operations, this is typically a Feb/Mar/Apr endeavour. I think you require cold (as in freezing point) temperatures overnight, which in most areas where Sugar- and/or Black-Maple grow isn't going to happen in June/July, for sap harvesting.

I stand to be corrected, though.
 

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From my understanding the best time to tap is when the nights get below freezing and they day temps like 40ish
 

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I see a bad moon arising
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I did a little research on it before tapping my soft maples this year.

I read that if you try to collect sap too late in the season -- after
the leaves start to bud, your syrup will taste "buddy".

Here's some links that may help. I found the ohioline.osu link particularly useful.

http://ohioline.osu.edu/for-fact/0036.html
Once the trees begin to break bud, chemical changes within the sap cause syrup to have an unpleasant flavor, often referred to as a "buddy" taste."

http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cach...e+syrup+tastes+buddy&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
Buddy syrup usually tastes chocolaty, almost a tootsie roll type flavor.
 

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Did you know that it is not only sugar maples that can be used for syrup? Someone out on Vancouver Island has an operation tapping big-leaf maples and birches for syrup and sugar. Just saw that on Canadian t.v.
 

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I was wondering if you can tap maple trees in like june and july for their sap?
nope...the sap will taste bad then. We're on Spring Break here right now, but last week we took a group of students to a sugar bush about 1/2 hour from the school, and we were told.... they tap only 2500 trees there, so are considered a very small operation. It takes 40 gallons of sap to get 1 gallon of syrup, and they generally only get about 6 weeks to do it; 8 weeks is a long run. Yes, you can tap many other trees for sap and consequently syrup, but the sugar content is highest in acer sacchurum. They need cold nights, and sunny days (exactly what we're having now!), so tomorrow we're off to get our year's supply! (2 gallons)
 

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no, the day time temps must be up with cool nights. This is the "trigger" for the trees to come out of dormancy, and the "sap runs" . Tapping at other times of the year may provide you with sap, but the sugar content will be low and flavor off. (the high sugar content in spring is actually stored the year before)
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Birch trees? Whats that syrup taste like?

Also how long does maple syrup last and where can I store it that it will last the longest?

Also What are all the trees you can tap for Syrup?
Birch sap has some sugar, it makes a drink which is rather like root beer, it can be fermented, before prohibition it was always fermented.

Are you familiar with the soda pop called: Moxie? It has some birch sap in it.

I honestly have no idea of how long maple syrup lasts. I can honey and maple syrup. To my understanding they are both high concentrations of sugar, so much sugar that very fungi or bugs can live in them, so they both last nearly forever.

There are different varieties of maple. They all produce sugar. Sugar Maple usually makes the highest content of sugar. From tree to tree it will vary, from season to season it will vary. Rock maple produces a sap that is very near to sugar maple's sugar content. Many sugar bushes in this area mix the saps. It takes so many years for a maple to get big enough to tap, that if you have a maple it is dumb to waste the sap regardless of the variety of tree.

Many trees produce an edible bark, inner bark, leaf, or sap.

Maple, birch, beech, ash, willow, ginkgo, pine, ...



As I understand things. In the fall, sap goes down into the root system. It carries sugar-energy. That energy is needed for the next year's growth. Like in many fruit trees, the next year's fruit production is determined by the previous year's sap levels.

Well, it is stored all winter long in the roots. The roots clarify the sugar. In the early spring the sap flows 'up' pushing all that sugar-energy into new leaves and new twigs. Once that new growth happens the sugar is gone.

You can injure a tree and get sap, but there is no sugar.

It takes all summer for the leaves to make more sugar, and during the summer as sugar is being made the sugar is 'up'. It must flow down again, which is when the leaves turn brown or red. The sap flows out of them.

Even in the fall, if you tapped the sap as it was going down, it would be nasty.



See doing things out here in the forest, everything must be done in it's season. The seasons control everything. Calendars and dates mean nothing. When the sap is ready, is when it is ready. When the bees leave their hive is when they leave their hive, and nothing man can do will change it.

There is a time for tapping sap, and a time for picking greens, a time for squeezing cider, and a time for butchering hogs.

On a farm about the only thing that is not controlled by the seasons is when you lit-up the still.
 
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