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Discussion Starter #1
Any body here make their own lumber, thinking about a portable sawmill, have a good stand or hemlock that's growing in pretty think and needs thinned out, plus some hardwood that's not too good for grade lumber but too good for firewood

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Dh got a small sawmill a few years ago. Has made many a board foot of lumber, ash, maple, black locust, hemlock and cherry. One important trick with mill was to get a hand held sprayer and use a mixture of something I cannot remember to cut the sap build up on the blade. I will try to find it.
 

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I build a band mill I use it for everything. Get lots of blades and a sharpener and setter.

The softer the wood the harder it is to cut. Cutting pine I can go through 5+ blades a day. With hardwood I can go most of the day with one blade. Both assume not hitting sand or forgin objects.

My blade rides on trailer tires. If I were to do it again I would go with Steel wheels. They can get much higher blade tension.


All and all it is a great tool to have.
 

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have you considered a chainsaw mill? even more portable and will get you boards in any size you want for construction.. like if my only goals was to go out and build a cabin, that's the route i'd go... of course if your goal is to produce a volume of lumber over a longer period of time, you'd want something a bit more optimized
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have a chainsaws mill arriving Monday, going to cut some beams I need for a project I got going, build this for my car and 1/2 ton truck to change the oil and filter and oil undercoat, but now I have a 1 ton ram and need to beef it up a bit


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I'm curious to know how that would work, because when I buy land, I would probably use a chainsaw mill to cut square beams for timber framing. But, then there's that whole debate as to whether you should use the timbers fresh, or dry them for a season first.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was always told by the Amish that they prefer almost green lumber to build with and they do a lot of building, I think I would prefer at least 1 year for shrinking if I was going to take on something major, but the planks I need green would be ok.
I think the reason is less splitting with the nails

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Building w/ green dimensional limber is very doable. Toenail all connections. It will be a stronger structure than kiln dried. Be cognizant that shrinkage will be evident in the width of the boards. Case in point, if shiplap, overlap a little extra.
 

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We have a friend who moved here from 'away'. She [Kathy] bought a piece of bare land that was densely wooded. She contracted a local family of carpenters to clear cut her land and to mill all of her trees into lumber, and then they built her a two-story cabin from her wood.

They did a real good job, and the cabin looks great.
 

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I was always told by the Amish that they prefer almost green lumber to build with and they do a lot of building, I think I would prefer at least 1 year for shrinking if I was going to take on something major, but the planks I need green would be ok.
I think the reason is less splitting with the nails

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There is a green timber framing method used by the Japanese where they cut a groove along the length of one face almost to the center of the beam. If I remember correctly it helps to dry the beam quicker and also eliminates checking. I cannot remember the name of the method but it shouldn’t be too hard to find if anyone is interested.
 

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There are different methods of building with green lumber than dry lumber. If building with green I would build the frame and outside sheathing right away then leave the inside open to air to allow it to dry without molding. Once it is dry then I would insulated and sheath the inside. Board and batton with proper nailing is designed for green lumber.

If you get a mill you also need a chainsaw, chains, come a longs, Jack's, cant hooks and a tractor also comes in handy.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
There are different methods of building with green lumber than dry lumber. If building with green I would build the frame and outside sheathing right away then leave the inside open to air to allow it to dry without molding. Once it is dry then I would insulated and sheath the inside. Board and batton with proper nailing is designed for green lumber.



If you get a mill you also need a chainsaw, chains, come a longs, Jack's, cant hooks and a tractor also comes in handy.
I pretty much have all the tools, in my younger days I worked in the woods skidding logs, also I worked in a sawmill for 7 years so I'm not a complete stranger to the concept of all the needs that have to be done.

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i have a wood-mizer. hydraulic loader, turner and leveler. uses water to lubricate and cool blade while cutting. get a metal detector to run over logs. i cut into a redwood log and hit a screwdriver someone had driven into the tree. totaled a blade beyond repare.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
i have a wood-mizer. hydraulic loader, turner and leveler. uses water to lubricate and cool blade while cutting. get a metal detector to run over logs. i cut into a redwood log and hit a screwdriver someone had driven into the tree. totaled a blade beyond repare.
When I worked in the sawmill, I was the offbarer and ran the edger, one day we hit a buggy spring in a log with the bellsaw, let me tell you that made things jingle

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I also have 3 sizes of Alaskan saw mills bought from Elof Granberg in person at his factory in Richmond,Ca. Had lunch with him at the Richmond Yacht Club on multiple occasions. He was up here at my property 1 time and cut a log in half with 1.[ Still have the log he cut.
https://granberg.com/about-granberg-international/ I have also used an Alaskan saw mill with a 6' bar and 2 homelite 1050s for larger logs.
 

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I pretty much have all the tools, in my younger days I worked in the woods skidding logs, also I worked in a sawmill for 7 years so I'm not a complete stranger to the concept of all the needs that have to be done.

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That's good. When I built mine I had no tools, no access or way to move logs and nowhere to set it up. I didn't even have proper tools to build it. It was mostly built with a hacksaw, hand drill and a borrowed welder out of used camper parts and a windmill.

The mill cost me very little but it took me a while to get a tractor, forks, chains, a saw and various hand tools that go with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yeah it takes a lot, I have a set of cutting torches Grinders drill press stick welder two mig welders abrasive cut-off saw and pretty much every thing I need, I wish I had a steel lathe i Still cut firewood I have saws and tractor and chains so I'm pretty well set as far as that goes

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