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DEFCON 4
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6,583 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
anyone have a quick and easy fix to make the handguards not move. obvoiusly not interested in jb weld etc....lolol:thumb:
 

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Banned
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2,077 Posts
Upgrading to a aftermarket rail/ free floating handguard seems like a viable option to me. You'll do three things in one fail swoop. You'll create a more accurate rifle, increase the versatility of the rifle and fix your loose handguard. Check around, there's a crap load of them out there to choose from.
 

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Mall Ninja Force Recon.
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69 Posts
What you call 'loose' I call 'well loved' :p ;)
Yes, but he's talking about his rifle not your old girlfriend Annie, Annie grab my fanny!

As to the hand guards, my Armalite carbine was cursed with flimsy loose hand guards as well. I ordered a new set from PK Firearms that are oh so snug and makes the rifle feel more like the quality firearm that it is.
 

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Space Cadet
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656 Posts
Like PSLMAN, my ArmaLite M15A4 handguards are loose. I put strips of electrical tape under the front tabs that help a lot but need a permanent solution. The RRA handguards from PK Firearms sound interesting. I've also heard that Noveske has an even better middy handguard and that G&R Tactical has some heavy thermold type middy handguards as well that are high quality.

Of course we're assuming the OP's M15A2 is an ArmaLite middy. Also his idea of JB Weld could work if building up the handguards where they contact the front clips.
 

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Registered
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4,886 Posts
Like PSLMAN, my ArmaLite M15A4 handguards are loose. I put strips of electrical tape under the front tabs that help a lot but need a permanent solution. The RRA handguards from PK Firearms sound interesting. I've also heard that Noveske has an even better middy handguard and that G&R Tactical has some heavy thermold type middy handguards as well that are high quality.

Of course we're assuming the OP's M15A2 is an ArmaLite middy. Also his idea of JB Weld could work if building up the handguards where they contact the front clips.
A good shimming trick I learned is to use JB weld. Grease up one side of the surface and use that painter's tape over the exposed surfaces of all neighboring parts. Clean the surface you want to build up. Spread a small amount on that surface. Use spring clamps or rubber bands to hold it in the position where it will make the most gap. Usually wait a bit on the JB weld and let it get a little thick before doing. Sorta like bedding a stock of a rifle.

This trick works well on a lot of things. Like pitted out aluminum cooling parts on engines.
 
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