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I have a Garand that's currently out of action due to a stripper clip that's jammed in the action.

Hopefully I'll be able to fix that to get her back in service, but I would recommend testing all of your stripper clips for reliability before you rely on them and find them failing.

I have reloading supplies (need to check how many 150gr bullets I have, so that needs to be factored in to avoid harming the op rod.

It's a decent option if one can confirm the rifle's reliability and reload enough ammo for it. That said, if you have no backup and the rifle has issues, I would worry about trying to remedy that in the midst of an SHTF scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
So my original thought about primary was considering places like Kali and the other anti-fun states. Or people who may have inherited one.

But also looking at it over the last weekend hunting, ya the M1 weighs a ton, especially when carrying out a critter.
But at the same time, the M1 can be put into service to protect the home and ranch as well as legally take big game (Elk) unlike the AR/5.56 that we use on deer and antelope.

Already having a number of clips that have been loaded longer than some here have been alive, and function perfectly, I am not overly concerned with them, and for those who mention running and gunning, assuming that I persevere in the fight unlike the adversary, why wouldn't someone police up their gear and brass?
You wouldn't leave P-Mags laying around would you?

Realistically I am not going to be playing batman in the boonies, regardless of AR, FAL or Garand.

The gun cost me nothing to get back, I already have ammo and clips, and it will be here until I pass it on. So putting it back "on the line" costs little compared with a new AR and the mags and accessories needed even in the before times.

Are there "better" options? Maybe, depends on what you need to do overall.
Are there worse options? Certainly.
 

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Runs great.

Bought a collection a couple years back and it was a part of it.

Like a paratrooper SKS the slightly shorter rifle is much handier. It wouldn't be my first choice, but with a few clips I could lay down some hate. (Of course, I have over 500 clips) if that's what I had to hand.

Its in the "not gonna sell" pile.
nicely done tankers are very cool JUST WEAR EAR PRO!
 

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Better than many other options but with the selection we have today and the advancements over the last 75 years no one can credibly say this would be the best option.
 

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Better than many other options but with the selection we have today and the advancements over the last 75 years no one can credibly say this would be the best option.
Thats kinda where I am at.

The Garand was developed in the aftermath of WW1, and its based on 1920s technology. The US Army held extensive manuvers on WW1 battlefields after the war, and these showed that a semi auto rifle was vastly superior to the bolt action Springfield, and that real life engagement ranges did not justify the power of the 30-06 cartridge. So the M1 was designed to hold ten rounds of a smaller, lighter 276 Pedersen cartridge, with ballistics close to the 250 Savage. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/.276_Pedersen The design change to chamber the 30-06 cartridge was made by General MacArthur.

As of its introduction in 1936, the Garand was absolutely the best combat rifle in the world, but within ten yrs both the Russians and Germans had produced better guns. That is the real lesson to be learned. No matter how good a weapon is when first introduced, an even better one will come along soon.

That said, any semi auto rifle with the power, accuracy of the Garand, and the option to shoot real armor piercing black tip bullets is worth consideration. After considering it, I bought a scout length M1a, and I have pulled several hundred black tip bullets from 30-06 cases, and reloaded them in 308 Winchester cases. While I like the M1 action, I prefer a shorter lighter gun with big detachable magazines.

I have also considered an AR15, in fact I owned one for 25 yrs. The 30-06 is too much, the 223 Rem is simply too little, so untill they come up with something better, I'll use a 308. Perhaps one day they will remember the 276 Perersen. Perhaps one day I will mod my scout squad to 6.5 Creedmore.
 

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but can you find 30-06 ammo that's Garand compatible / won't bend the op rod

Garand is definitely in the it could be pressed into service if something better like an AR15 isn't at hand category

Great fun to shoot especially in an old school garand match but definitely not what you'd want as your main.
Privi Partizan makes new manufacture 30-06 that is Garand compatible.

Also, a $40 adjustable gas plug solves the ammo/op-rod issue.

Ammo availability. It is there for the 30-06 because of all the 308 battle rifles. It just isn't something people reach for first anymore.

06' just slipped through the cracks. It's killed commies before, it can do it again.
 

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I've pondered this question a lot. My Garands have been my most reliable firearms aside from my Bolt rifles. After carrying it hunting all weekend last weekend I've decided the weight does not bother me and I would probably want the larger caliber over 556 or 223 in the long run.

I can still find Ammo in stores as well, I can't find 556 or 223 at the moment in my area
 

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I've pondered this question a lot. My Garands have been my most reliable firearms aside from my Bolt rifles. After carrying it hunting all weekend last weekend I've decided the weight does not bother me and I would probably want the larger caliber over 556 or 223 in the long run.

I can still find Ammo in stores as well, I can't find 556 or 223 at the moment in my area
be careful of the ammo you find

Our club shot a lot of Garand Matches - 30 rounds - lots of fun a lot of guys were thumbing in 150 grainer out of the plain old green boxes , know who I'm talking about, It mostly worked fine but couple time every year , someone would kink an op rod - I think I recall the cheap russian 30-06 was also not Garand healthy

Adjustable gas plug can help with this IF you actually do the adjusting
 

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One other thing ammo wise. If you reload, you need to pay attention to what youre doing and understand why you need to do certain things.

You have to make sure the brass is properly sized and prepped.

You have to use the proper primers and you have to make sure they are properly seated, and if you use military brass, the primer pockets properly prepped.

I always found commercial brass worked much better and easier than military and gave a longer life and the least trouble.

Ive never used an adjustable gas plug, so I cant say one way or the other if they work or not. Ive been shooting M1's both recreationally and in matches since the early 60's, and never saw a bent op rod. Actually never heard of it until the internet popped up.

Im not sure how real a problem it really is, unless maybe youre shooting nothing but a steady diet of heavy bullets with slow burning powders thats consdered to be the "wrong stuff".

Then again, all Ive ever shot out of them, was either GI ball, or reloads loaded to that spec.

This was the spec we loaded to, using Lake City's data from 69.....

50 grains of 4895 under a 150 grain FMJBT bullet running around 2750fps.


Not so much an ammo issue here, but ammo realted ina way, if youre going to load a lot of single rounds, you really need to get a SLED. If not, then slip the round into the chamber flush and ease the bolt forward, and seat it with the heel of you hand. DONT let it slam on a loose round.

The M1's are good guns, but do require specifc things, if you want them to work properly, and be safe.
 

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The M2 pretty much everywhere. The M2 "Carbine", not so much.
 

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Still a very capable rifles and one of the fastest to reload. Really the only hinderance it has in my opinion for primary defense is that it's fairly expensive to do any serious training with. Reloader or not, it has a ~2 or 3 to 1 cost per round over 5.56x45 and 7.62x39 depending on the load. A fine firearm though.
 

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Bought a Danish Var M1 Garand off a buddy about 7 years ago.
Affordable ammo was hard to find then.

Only place that had it at the time was the CMP. I didn't / don't feel like jumping through their hoops.

Affordable 7.62x51 was / is easier to find. Sold the M1.
 

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be careful of the ammo you find

Our club shot a lot of Garand Matches - 30 rounds - lots of fun a lot of guys were thumbing in 150 grainer out of the plain old green boxes , know who I'm talking about, It mostly worked fine but couple time every year , someone would kink an op rod - I think I recall the cheap russian 30-06 was also not Garand healthy

Adjustable gas plug can help with this IF you actually do the adjusting
"Garand Safe Ammo" really is just an old wives tale. It's been tested over and over by different individuals that you can run just about any commercial ammo in a Garand with no negative effects. Those guys that claim to bend oprods typically have no idea what they are talking about but just want a story to tell. There is much more of a worry of running old Milsurp corrosive ammo unless you plan on completely stripping and cleaning for corrosive rounds. No adjustable gas plugs needed either. They are more of a gimmick or peace of mind. I haven't had any trouble shooting everything from a light round (125 grain) to 220 grain and a 500 FPS difference with the standard gas plug in any of my Garands. Have yet to have a failure.

For hunting we run a pretty hot round ~3000 FPS but only 150 grain because down here there isn't anything really large enough to even need that much for unless you need to make it through a boar shoulder from a distance. For just shooting, I found PPU to be the best all around when it comes to cost and reliability and they have good brass for reloading.
 

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Thats kinda where I am at.

The Garand was developed in the aftermath of WW1, and its based on 1920s technology. The US Army held extensive manuvers on WW1 battlefields after the war, and these showed that a semi auto rifle was vastly superior to the bolt action Springfield, and that real life engagement ranges did not justify the power of the 30-06 cartridge. So the M1 was designed to hold ten rounds of a smaller, lighter 276 Pedersen cartridge, with ballistics close to the 250 Savage. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/.276_Pedersen The design change to chamber the 30-06 cartridge was made by General MacArthur.

As of its introduction in 1936, the Garand was absolutely the best combat rifle in the world, but within ten yrs both the Russians and Germans had produced better guns. That is the real lesson to be learned. No matter how good a weapon is when first introduced, an even better one will come along soon.

That said, any semi auto rifle with the power, accuracy of the Garand, and the option to shoot real armor piercing black tip bullets is worth consideration. After considering it, I bought a scout length M1a, and I have pulled several hundred black tip bullets from 30-06 cases, and reloaded them in 308 Winchester cases. While I like the M1 action, I prefer a shorter lighter gun with big detachable magazines.

I have also considered an AR15, in fact I owned one for 25 yrs. The 30-06 is too much, the 223 Rem is simply too little, so untill they come up with something better, I'll use a 308. Perhaps one day they will remember the 276 Perersen. Perhaps one day I will mod my scout squad to 6.5 Creedmore.
While the Russians made some innovative stuff by the end of WWII, I was wondering what you thought the Germans made that was superior to the Garand in that time that was carried by the common Infantryman?
 

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While the Russians made some innovative stuff by the end of WWII, I was wondering what you thought the Germans made that was superior to the Garand in that time that was carried by the common Infantryman?
G43. If for no other reason due to your ability to "top off" a partially expended magazine.

Yes, I own both.
 

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don't know what to tell you our club has had several garands in matches go down with kinked op rods over the years - seems it was green box Remington and I think steel case Russian stuff -

That said a lot lot lot of guys over the year were just thumbing in green box Remington 150's so it might be one of those lotto things - it works just up to the point it doesn't.

Some of the real old timers could straighten a bend op rod and return rifle to service. That was an impressive bit of red neck gun plumbing


"Garand Safe Ammo" really is just an old wives tale. It's been tested over and over by different individuals that you can run just about any commercial ammo in a Garand with no negative effects. Those guys that claim to bend oprods typically have no idea what they are talking about but just want a story to tell. There is much more of a worry of running old Milsurp corrosive ammo unless you plan on completely stripping and cleaning for corrosive rounds. No adjustable gas plugs needed either. They are more of a gimmick or peace of mind. I haven't had any trouble shooting everything from a light round (125 grain) to 220 grain and a 500 FPS difference with the standard gas plug in any of my Garands. Have yet to have a failure.

For hunting we run a pretty hot round ~3000 FPS but only 150 grain because down here there isn't anything really large enough to even need that much for unless you need to make it through a boar shoulder from a distance. For just shooting, I found PPU to be the best all around when it comes to cost and reliability and they have good brass for reloading.
 

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While the Russians made some innovative stuff by the end of WWII, I was wondering what you thought the Germans made that was superior to the Garand in that time that was carried by the common Infantryman?
The German StG 44 was designed and introduced during WW2.
The Soviet AK 47 started development during WW2, but was not introduced untill after the war.

Both of these weapons actualy met the design criteria developed for the Garand.
They used a low pressure, intermediate power cartridge, allowing controled full automatic fire.

Btw, the case dimentions of the 276 Petersen cartridge closely match the 7.62x39. It was slightly longer (51mm) but could easily be called the father of assault catridges.
 
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