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I think without gas or diesel the people of Alaska and remote areas of Canada would have to go back to heating/cooking with wood. For travel they would use sleds, or kayaks. I don't agree that the knowledge has been lost. There are many who still use sleds and kayaks for recreational purposes. I would imagine that most have fireplaces or woodstoves in their homes.

The worst thing that will happen without fossil fuels is the lack of jobs and lack of food. If grocery stores cannot be resupplied, I don't think there would be enough food for the population that currently lives there. Life in the arctic would become so difficult that a huge percentage of the population would migrate south.
 

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Grevcon 10
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I think without gas or diesel the people of Alaska and remote areas of Canada would have to go back to heating/cooking with wood. For travel they would use sleds, or kayaks. I don't agree that the knowledge has been lost. There are many who still use sleds and kayaks for recreational purposes. I would imagine that most have fireplaces or woodstoves in their homes.

The worst thing that will happen without fossil fuels is the lack of jobs and lack of food. If grocery stores cannot be resupplied, I don't think there would be enough food for the population that currently lives there. Life in the arctic would become so difficult that a huge percentage of the population would migrate south.
The area in Alaska was Tundra (No trees).
 

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The area in Alaska was Tundra (No trees).
I didn't see the show, but if there is nothing but snow and ice, I would assume it would become uninhabitable. Good reason for those living in tundra to stock up on fuels and all other supplies if they plan to try to stay; also to have a way to GOOD if it comes to that. If there was some hunting to be done there, it would have to be hunting parties which go out from a base camp in the warmest months. The lifestyle would only be for a select few.

Did they happen to say in the show how many currently live on the tundra currently?
 

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Only thing they could have burned would be fat rendered from blubber... unless the is some coal or peat there. Also their igloos had a very small space inside that needed to be heated, so a small fire would suffice. This is not the case with a larger drafty house.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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They've developed a lifestyle dependent upon petroleum. It's not sustainable without petroleum.

Think about how the indigenous peoples lived before the technology; small homes, igloos, etc. Their homes were not elaborate nor large, because heating them was difficult.

The carrying capacity of the region was not huge, and thus wouldn't and couldn't have supported large populations.

Take away the petroleum and people will have to move or die.
 

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I wouldn't say lost knowledge ,rather a force of social ecologiclly sensitive concern over using whale oil and seal oil .
There is not that much in trees to use for fire wood and the techknology for making hydrogen gas is just getting developed on an effecient level .
Also big business supresses the knowledge of how to drill for gas and oil on a personal level, many homes already live on the top of .
A friend of mine said that in texas there are places oil covers the ground every where , but no one goes to harvest it .
Gas and oil are all over the planet ,yet most people tend to be lazy and ignorant of simple things already at their finger tips .
Do you have solar , if not why not . A wind mill, if not why not ?
Photovoltic solar has been around senvce before the 19th century ,wind has been around ,well, forever .
People do many things with out fore thought ,assuming to bring their city life to the country and it doesn't work .
North eastern europe is now facing the conciquences of assuming weather would never change ,in the way they built their homes , but now that the gulf stream has slowed or stopped the warm water that once made the difference for them now is gone and thay are sharing the same tempratures other places have always had at the same latitude .
Dad was talked into making his first home all electric, but this only lasted for as long as it took to make enough money to replace the stove , refrigerator and electric heaters with gas .
For the money at the time gas was much cheaper than electricity, but either one is still a dependency on an out side supplier .
I prefir solar ,and using wood from my own trees for cooking and heating needs .
A wind millis in the works soon ,to supliment shop needs .
 

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The knowledge hasn't been lost. Whats been lost is the ability to manufacture the items needed (in the quanities needed) in a world with limited or no oil based fuels.
 

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They've developed a lifestyle dependent upon petroleum. It's not sustainable without petroleum.

Think about how the indigenous peoples lived before the technology; small homes, igloos, etc. Their homes were not elaborate nor large, because heating them was difficult.

The carrying capacity of the region was not huge, and thus wouldn't and couldn't have supported large populations.

Take away the petroleum and people will have to move or die.
This is one of the rare cases where bugging out is probably the only option for many of them unless they have mastered the traditional old skills and can almost immediately adapt to that lifestyle.
 

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I often wish I knew as much as my Grandfathers and Grandmothers. As a whole Im not sure we know less or more. We know the world we live in. They knew the world they lived in. To us on this forum their knowledge was clearly more valuable.

The area in Alaska was Tundra (No trees).
Indigenous people who traveled the tundra had evolved the ability to eat raw meat for a reason. The fuel they did use for fire was driftwood, dried plants, animal fat, and Caribou sh-t.
 

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IRT is following semi drivers that deliver supplies up the haul road, that is the alaskan oil pipeline haul road. The villages they deliver food and fuel to are reasonably close to a massive source of fuel. They could revert back to cutting and burning wood if ghats available, or hey could develop a way of burning crude oil from the Prudoe fields.

In Alaska, reasonably close might still be 1-200 miles and require a weeks travel by boat during summer.
 
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