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im looking for a canner for home use but the best one on the market seems to be made from aluminium. Is there a good one made from stainless steel? I'd like to be able to cook with it too.
 

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Not really. You can use the 10qt Fagor for canning, but it's small and you have to can at 15 psi instead of 10psi.

It's more practical to buy a 4 or 6 qt presto cooker and a big canner.

I've got an old 8qt canner that I use for small batches from my square foot garden, but for bushels of things from the farmers market or orchards I use 2 22qt presto canners. I also have a 4 qt and 6qt stainless cookers that I use to cook beans and quick meals.
 

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stainless fatigues where aluminum can handle the stretching from the pressure going up and down better.
Yeah right that's why the skin came off the Aloha Airlines plane because aluminum handles stretching so well. Aluminum work hardens as bad as any 300 stainless.

If you can stretch stainless with 15psi I'd love to see it. A stainless pressure canner would cost about 3 times that an aluminum one in tooling alone, not to mention that all american could never cast one.
 

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They use aluminum because it heats more evenly (conducts) than stainless without hot spots. The best stainless pots and pressure cookers have aluminum plates sealed into the bottom for that reason, if you want the best canner it will be an aluminum one. If you want to save space, buy an All American 930 canner and store your stainless cooker inside it :)
 

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They use aluminum because it's cheap and cheap and easy to work with. Pressure cookers were made of cast iron, no aluminum pot heats more evenly than cast iron but cast iron canners were heavy and were troublesome to maintain. Hot spots in a pressure cooker and canner are not relevent as it is pressurized steam that is doing the cooking not contact with the bottom of the pot. As far as All American being the best. That's a judgement call. Who's going to admit that something they spent $400 for is not better than the $80 alternative.
 

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The entire canner has to heat up, even the lid has to be up to heat and I don't think stainless would work since it heats so unevenly and almost refuses to conduct heat. Most stainless pressure cookers are small and still have an aluminum bottom in them to conduct the heat better.



If there is an $80 canner out there that is as good as any All American canner, I'd be the first to buy one. I own 4 different canners and have used many different ones, I can tell you exactly and objectively what the differences are. To me it all depends on what you want, how much money you have and how much you will be canning.

If you want a canner to can 7 quarts per load and aren't going to can much, I really don't know why you would buy an All American canner. But if you want top of the line and plan to go through many quarts per year, you won't find a better one for the money.

I paid $200 for my 941 All American canner, not $400. It does 20 quarts per load but the fact that it never needs a gasket, is made of forged aluminum and is twice as thick as a Presto are just bonuses to me. Considering the fact that they will last a lifetime with no maintenance, I think a 930 (holds 14 quart jars per load) is a good investment for $280 (shipped) if you want the best. I don't know why you would spend $200 on an All American 921 when you could go $80 more for a 930 and get double the capacity or $120 less for a Presto and get the same capacity.... Yes they are made better and are gasketless, but not worth $120 more for the same capacity IMO.
 

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They sound like a jackhamer. The presto has a nice squish squish rhythm. A far better zen. Plus a presto is easier to lift.
 

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Thanks to all. I think il get the 915
Lol, so you fall into the "I don't care what it costs" category :upsidedown:

By the way, the 915 isn't big enough to hold half gallon jars. The 921 and up will (in case that's an issue for you).
 

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The entire canner has to heat up, even the lid has to be up to heat and I don't think stainless would work since it heats so unevenly and almost refuses to conduct heat. Most stainless pressure cookers are small and still have an aluminum bottom in them to conduct the heat better.



If there is an $80 canner out there that is as good as any All American canner, I'd be the first to buy one. I own 4 different canners and have used many different ones, I can tell you exactly and objectively what the differences are. To me it all depends on what you want, how much money you have and how much you will be canning.

If you want a canner to can 7 quarts per load and aren't going to can much, I really don't know why you would buy an All American canner. But if you want top of the line and plan to go through many quarts per year, you won't find a better one for the money.

I paid $200 for my 941 All American canner, not $400. It does 20 quarts per load but the fact that it never needs a gasket, is made of forged aluminum and is twice as thick as a Presto are just bonuses to me. Considering the fact that they will last a lifetime with no maintenance, I think a 930 (holds 14 quart jars per load) is a good investment for $280 (shipped) if you want the best. I don't know why you would spend $200 on an All American 921 when you could go $80 more for a 930 and get double the capacity or $120 less for a Presto and get the same capacity.... Yes they are made better and are gasketless, but not worth $120 more for the same capacity IMO.
Actually I run 2 canners for 14 quarts a load and can turn them around in half the time of your 941 which gives me 28 quarts processed in the time it takes you to process 20. Heating up all that mass uses much more fuel than my prestos and the 12 qt mirro which also handles 7 quarts, but really destroys the rhythm of the canning process. Your all americans will last a lifetime provided nothing ever gouges the sealing surface then you better have a spare top or bottom or know how to heliarc and polish. Your canner is cast not forged, not that it makes much difference though castings are somewhat brittle by nature. The presto is forged as deep draw pressing is a cold forging process resulting in a stronger product.

Stainless steel is actually a better material for a pressure retort as it does not conduct but absorbs heat, thus less of the heat entering the system is dissipated to the room environment and more heat is used to process the product. The downside is it would take longer for the canner to cool down. A 23 qt stainless canner fully load would be ungodly heavy to heft around, your 941 is bad enough.
 

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Yeah, the 941 is 100 pounds fully loaded (I weighed it). The 930 is around 70 pounds if I can remember right. I can get the 941 from 0 to 10 pounds in under 30 minutes with the propane turkey frier, but cooldown time is more like 35-45 minutes. That's a good thing to me because the jars inside cool down slower and loose less fluid and I sort of enjoy waiting on them.

The cheap little Mirro we have will do a measly 7 quart load in more than half that time if I can get it to seal right, but those China canners are so flimsy that I rarely use it. Between broken gaskets and removing busted jars, it's just more cost efficient to use the all American made All American 941 :)

Interesting facts about the Presto and Mirro canners:

Presto canners are so cheap that they once included gauges that read "5 pounds, 10 pounds, 11 pounds, and TAKE COVER!!"

Mirro canners were originally named not because of their reflective silver color, but because their thickness is so close to that of the silver coating on mirrors.

In 1984, the Presto canner company announced that they would be doubling the thickness of their canners to 6 layers of aluminum foil. Shortly after this the company went bankrupt and settled on an ultra light 4 layer design.

Presto factory workers are usually experts at building their canners and often reach an unheard of pay rate of $1.62 per hour by the time they are 12 years old.

Presto canners are even considered cheap by their own employees, often referring to them as "A yen a dozen".
 

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I just bought mine off walmart.com... It's a 23 quart presto..
I was reading reviews and I found that the presto is the most "passed down" pressure canner/cookers because it lasts! I paid about $90 for it but it'll last a long time.
Buyer's remorse is a terrible thing. I was reading around the web, Presto is really a scumbag company. Makes great canners though.
 

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Just buy a stainless steel pot that the canner rack will fit in. That's what I use to make small batches of applebutter or lemon curd. Otherwise you can use the enamel pots too, cook with it regularly and then fit a rack in it and voila' you have a canner. So long as your pot has a lid, a rack and you have enough room to cover your jars with an inch of water and boil you have a boiling water canner.
 
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