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(Finally) found a compound SLIDING 12' miter saw (Dewalt, for $200) yesterday.

I've been looking for about 4 months. (Plenty of 10", plenty which don't slide...) then I got sticker shock looking at the blades!

I'll mostly be using it on soft wood, got a bunch of cedar trim to finish up at my place, and some bee boxes to make out of pine, but given the cost I thought I'd ask what brand saw blades are liked...
 

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Another for the Diablo blades , as for tough here is how tough.
Over 100 cuts from a 10 inch blade through 1 1/2 - .065 wall crom-moly steel tubing , yup a wood blade that cuts steel as well. Probably not recommended but it does indeed hold up to the task. No joke!
 

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Depends on what you're trying to do with it, and how high quality of a blade you want.

You can go anywhere from ~24 tooth for framing a wall, all the way up to 96 tooth or higher for fine trim work.

Freud Diablo blades are very common, mediocre quality but cheap. The Diablo blades or the DeWalt blades will probably be best suited for a homeowner type application. CMT is about in line with Freud.

Forrest makes good blades, but they're more expensive.

The best ones, hands down, are the Tenryu blades. However, be prepared to pay for them. Over $100 for a 96 tooth blade. Festool blades are awesome too, but you pay for the name with Festool blades at ~$150 for a 96 tooth blade.
 

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Festool makes great stuff
I've used there blades on pergo flooring and it lasted for the job ,but still need to be changed out.
I think the thin curf blades cut better ( never tried a festoon fine trim blade)
If it was up to me I would use all festool equipment , but I can't really buy them local .
I don't really cut and nail much , and I do like the makita/Bosh tools.
I had a truck robed last year 6000 bucks and it was my truck .
The guys break a lot of equipment so replacing tool doesn't kill me.
We blew out 3 Hatachi framing guns since September.
 

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For cross-cutting soft woods with a 12" blade buy a carbide tipped 60 tooth alternating tooth configuration blade. An aggressive tooth angle hook is ok for wood and will last a long time between sharpenings. I like a less aggressive tooth angle for a slightly better cut. A zero angle or reverse angle tooth is nice too as it will cut wood as well as plexiglas and aluminums without grabbing and tearing them up. They kind of "scrape" there way through the material creating a little more heat and need to be sharpened a little more often. After a time and you can afford it, it's nice to have both.

When cutting softwoods it's important to make sure your blade doesn't build-up hardened pitch around the teeth. I clean mine regularly with a rag and some laq thinner... with the saw un-plugged, that is.
 

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I bought a Bosch 10" SCMS and I'm happy with the factory blade. I switch it with a Forest chopmaster for critical stuff but it's hard to tell the difference. I run the chopmaster on my dewalt chopsaw (no sliding- its for portable use), and it beats the hell out of the Dewalt blade.

You can argue there are better deals than Forrest, but you don't have to guess on the quality. Since I live in the middle of nowhere, I have 2 so I can switch it out if needed. Also run a 10" WWII on my table saw (plus a spare.)
 
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