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Bug-In Prepper
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So is this the same bullet as the "Black" tip 30-06 military surplus ammo......???
No. Black tip has a core made of tool steel (steel hardened to BHN 600+), making it strong and hard but brittle.

Tungsten carbide is a ceramic of tungsten and carbon. It is more than twice as dense as steel (7.6 g/cc vs 15.6 g/cc) and harder, but also brittle.

Both will penetrate monolithic targets quite effectively, but their brittleness means they might have trouble with multi-layer targets. If an early layer causes the core to fracture, the shards will penetrate later layers to a shallower depth.

A milder steel (like the soft BHN 170 steel in most 7.62x39mm, or harder steels up to BHN 350 or so) will penetrate monolithic targets to less depth, but will better hold their shape (deforming rather than shattering) and may do a better job penetrating multi-layer targets.

DU and Tungsten-heavy alloy give you the best of both worlds. They are extremely dense (19.0 g/cc for DU, 17.0 g/cc for W90-Ni7-Fe3), hard and strong, but also have enough ductility to not shatter in multi-layer targets.
 

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I had about 500 rounds of very clean WWII 8mm armor piercing rounds. Kick myself for trading them and my mauser. But then again I miss every gun I ever traded.
 

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Resident Gold miner
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If you only need .308, go to Gunbroker and get the old WWII black tip for a reasonable price. Pull and reload them.
 

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Combat marxism Now!
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Only slightly off topic, but I had a DU "bucking bar" (for setting aircraft rivets) and it was amazingly heavy for it's size. It was made from a counterweight. It was very mildly radioactive and I gave it away, preferring not to have radioactive stuff in my tool box.
 

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Bug-In Prepper
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If price is no object, you could hypothetically construct bullets with a core of 70% platinum, 30% iridium. That would give them an even higher density than DU (21.7 g/cc), with a strength and hardness comparable to hardened steel.

http://matweb.com/search/DataSheet.aspx?MatGUID=e1063aa1c5734cc1bb8f9cbb93b5c4aa

With platinum at $29.19/gram and iridium at $52.89/gram, putting a 150 grain core of the alloy into a bullet would cost $353 in material alone.

Jokes aside, the main advantage of this over DU would be ready availability to civilians.
 

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Comic, not your lawyer!
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No. Black tip has a core made of tool steel (steel hardened to BHN 600+), making it strong and hard but brittle.

Tungsten carbide is a ceramic of tungsten and carbon. It is more than twice as dense as steel (7.6 g/cc vs 15.6 g/cc) and harder, but also brittle.

Both will penetrate monolithic targets quite effectively, but their brittleness means they might have trouble with multi-layer targets. If an early layer causes the core to fracture, the shards will penetrate later layers to a shallower depth.

A milder steel (like the soft BHN 170 steel in most 7.62x39mm, or harder steels up to BHN 350 or so) will penetrate monolithic targets to less depth, but will better hold their shape (deforming rather than shattering) and may do a better job penetrating multi-layer targets.

DU and Tungsten-heavy alloy give you the best of both worlds. They are extremely dense (19.0 g/cc for DU, 17.0 g/cc for W90-Ni7-Fe3), hard and strong, but also have enough ductility to not shatter in multi-layer targets.
This got me wondering if the tungsten carbine tips on saw blades is the same material?

Seems a creative reloader could fashon these into the core of soft lead bullets so as to not upset the balance or expose the carbide to the rifling.

Getting these old blades is essentially free.
 

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Only slightly off topic, but I had a DU "bucking bar" (for setting aircraft rivets) and it was amazingly heavy for it's size. It was made from a counterweight. It was very mildly radioactive and I gave it away, preferring not to have radioactive stuff in my tool box.
i never would have thought about making a tool out of DU.

but then, i never realized that a lot of gas lamp mantles are mildly radioactive
 
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