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more bricks, no straw?
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Look Again to 2001 Collapse in Argentina


I think it's important to look to Argentina, which predated Greece's problems, and see what happened and what they did there. I don't see Americans banging pots in the streets, though. Do you?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH6_i8zuffs&feature=youtu.be

Documentary on the events that led to the economic collapse of Argentina in 2001 which wiped out the middle class and raised the level of poverty to 57.5%. Central to the collapse was the implementation of neo-liberal policies which enabled the swindle of billions of dollars by foreign banks and corporations. Many of Argentina's assets and resources were shamefully plundered. Its financial system was even used for money laundering by Citibank, Credit Suisse, and JP Morgan. The net result was massive wealth transfers and the impoverishment of society which culminated in many deaths due to oppression and malnutrition.


Part 1 of 12 (click to watch on youtube and see the entire video)
 

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Look Again to 2001 Collapse in Argentina


I think it's important to look to Argentina, which predated Greece's problems, and see what happened and what they did there. I don't see Americans banging pots in the streets, though. Do you?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH6_i8zuffs&feature=youtu.be

Documentary on the events that led to the economic collapse of Argentina in 2001 which wiped out the middle class and raised the level of poverty to 57.5%. Central to the collapse was the implementation of neo-liberal policies which enabled the swindle of billions of dollars by foreign banks and corporations. Many of Argentina's assets and resources were shamefully plundered. Its financial system was even used for money laundering by Citibank, Credit Suisse, and JP Morgan. The net result was massive wealth transfers and the impoverishment of society which culminated in many deaths due to oppression and malnutrition.

‪Argentina's Economic Collapse - Part 1 of 12‬‏ - YouTube

Part 1 of 12 (click to watch on youtube and see the entire video)
http://www.themodernsurvivalist.com/
 

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Never Give up
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Well I see that and its kinda funny. All that wealth lost but the people who had gold and silver put away are the only ones who maintained there wealth. Even thought they had to hide it for a while. Makes you wonder why there are so many people telling us that PMs are so bad for us. I wonder what there motives are. hummmm
 

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Taken fromm survivalblog

"SurvivalBlog's correspondent in Argentina received the following e-mail:

FerFAL:
I greatly value your experience in Argentina. Since you have traveled in the U.S., I would like to know what you think will be the impact of our relative lack of corruption, at least at local levels, to what we may face in our coming economic crisis. Perhaps a separate post on the subject, if you have time?

Here was his reply:

This is where things get more into the “guesstimating” territory.
Nothing is for sure and all we have is certain situations being more probable than others.

Inflation
That is already occurring and will likely get worse. Not only in actual prices going up, but in more “hidden” ways, such as servings and packs getting suspiciously smaller but keeping their old price, which will later rise even more.
Here for example, small pudding chocolate desert cups, called Danet and made by Nestle, are surprisingly small, something that you empty in 4 or 5 teaspoons.
But the advertisement on TV, says something like “The perfect size to keep your figure!”
These marketing guys aren’t exactly rocket scientists.:)
You can imagine our surprise when we traveled to Spain and found the exact same chocolate desert/snack cup, Danet by Nestle, but with a cup nearly 4 times bigger!
Inflation at first just ****es you off. But as it gets out of control it turns into a serious problem: Suddenly you find that you already ran out of money a few days or a week before the end of the month.
That’s when you see that due to inflation, you can’t keep on going like this you need to reduce expenses.
But what happens when you reduce them as much as you can, inflation is still going up and your salary just doesn’t compensate.
That’s what I mean when I said you should already start looking for new ways of making money.

Security
That’s probably our greatest problem and eventually crime will get worse in USA because of all this as well.
Here’s were the differences may come into play: America’s police isn’t nearly as corrupt as the police in Argentina, so that will work for your advantage.
But on the other hand, you guys have a more diverse population, which we don’t, and that may contribute to more social disorder.
Anyway, as mentioned in several posts, be prepared to take care of your own security. Safety habits are very important and it’s not goof enough that you are reading this, your entire family must be along with you in the same boat on this matter.
What’s the use in being Mr. Tactical killing machine when your 16 year old daughter doesn’t listen and will spend nearly an hour talking with her boyfriend at the front door--the door opened door for anyone that wants to force their way in.
Also if you are Mr. Tactical bad a**, chances are they won't go after you, but after the weakest link of the chain ( your kids and wife)

Stress
As mentioned before, expect a lot of emotional problems from people. Suicides may become more common, at least that’s what happened here as well. It got to point were we had 2 or 3 guys killing themselves under the train each week. Total chaos to get to downtown.
I don’t know man, things just change a lot.
For example, I was telling the guys at Minionreport the other day.
We were talking with my son the other day and we talked about what he wants to be when he grows up. He’s six years old.
Doctor, soldier, fireman, astronaut, those were okay according to him, all those except policeman.
“Why not policeman” we asked puzzled.
“Because they get killed a lot, everyday a policeman dies on the news, a policeman got shot today, a policeman was killed today. No no policeman”
My wife ad I didn’t know what to say. I mean, it is true, we just didn’t expect him to notice. And children do notice even if grownups hope they don’t.All the small things
Impossible to mention them all, but one thing you can expect in a country that has little money to spend due to the crisis, is for services and infrastructure to suffer.
Expect power going down more often due to lack of maintenance. Store several LED lights and install emergency lights. A generator will be needed, also see about installing electric protections against high voltage surges when power comes back up.
Expect water to become of worse quality, get a filter even if you have supposedly potable tap water. One day it may not be that potable any more.
Roads are something that go bad surprisingly fast. Expect them to rot because of little maintenance due to lack of funds, specially after heavy rains.
Within a year or so, you may start seeing holes on the road, some of them real craters, and busting a tire in one of them is no joke.
I already spent a small fortune fixing everything that goes wrong in my car due to the poor conditions of the streets here.
What else? We’ll just have to wait and see. - FerFAL"
 

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Look Again to 2001 Collapse in Argentina


I think it's important to look to Argentina, which predated Greece's problems, and see what happened and what they did there. I don't see Americans banging pots in the streets, though. Do you?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH6_i8zuffs&feature=youtu.be

Documentary on the events that led to the economic collapse of Argentina in 2001 which wiped out the middle class and raised the level of poverty to 57.5%. Central to the collapse was the implementation of neo-liberal policies which enabled the swindle of billions of dollars by foreign banks and corporations. Many of Argentina's assets and resources were shamefully plundered. Its financial system was even used for money laundering by Citibank, Credit Suisse, and JP Morgan. The net result was massive wealth transfers and the impoverishment of society which culminated in many deaths due to oppression and malnutrition.

‪Argentina's Economic Collapse - Part 1 of 12‬‏ - YouTube

Part 1 of 12 (click to watch on youtube and see the entire video)
I watched this documentary very closely. Its a playbook for destroying an economy so that you can buy up its productive resources for almost nothing while indenturing its population to pay interest forever.

It is the same tactics that is used on Greece, Portugal, Ireland, Iceland and Spain as their economies fail.

It was the same tactics used against China at the beginning of the 20th century.
 

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In the third video of the series cited by the OP, the Argentine Economy Minister of 1983 goes by the somewhat ironic sounding name of “Grinspun”. Hmm... Pronounced in Spanish, sounds like, uh..
 

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Dirty or clean.Wet or dry
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99% of Americans probably don't know who the IMf is, or atleast did until SK was arrested. I wonder what the numbers were in Argentia being a random interview from the crowd did. They'd probably be livid if they knew of the policies combined with how much we fund it. That should be our first spending cut followed by the UN.
 

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blackkitty:
In fact, thats starting now in the whole home grown/green market revolution taking place in every city. Cuts out the typical food supply chain, farm products sold off the trucks direct to city folks.
 

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This should be eye opening for alot of peope. I read an article by a young Architech during this time. He said he carried a pistol when he went anywhere.
 

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He said he carried a pistol when he went anywhere.
That’s as it should be, in this country you should be responsible for your protection. Ferfal is a great source of info but on the econ side the Argentine peso wasn't the world’s currency it was pegged to the dollar.
 

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more bricks, no straw?
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here's a blog from a guy in Argentina

http://ferfal.blogspot.com/
Thanks so much for FerFal's info. I think that I will read his blog and buy his book. Funny how America really didn't "tune in" much to what was going on in Argentina. If it had not been for Italian friends of mine, I wouldn't really have "noticed" as much as the media has more tantalizing fare for us to ponder than some country down there...wherever...it is. Cheesh. :xeye:
 

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Funny how much attention Argentina gets in this regards.
Never mind the man behind the curtain...
 
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more bricks, no straw?
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Not sure I understand why the two are mutually exclusive. We're just looking at the aftermath in this instance, in order to glean some insight. Doesn't mean that we're ignoring Oz and the man behind the curtain. Please explain more if I'm not understanding you properly.
 
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