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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
location: decidous forest northeast usa

First aid -- Local know-how
Keep warm --Wool pants/coat/hat/gloves/socks (clothes) /shoes/blanket
Keep dry -- Leather poncho
Boil water --Steel Pot
Carry water --Leather canteen
Make fire -- Hand drill / lens
Find food -- Knife / leather rock sling / bow + arrows
Luxury -- Sunglasses, Axe,
Carry gear -- Large pack
Traits to know --Cordage and basket making

What would you bring if you had to live long-term (over a year) in the wilderness ( of your choosing ) mostly primitive with only a few modern comforts? Just a disscussion... This is what i would look to bring for the topics i think are important. No need to use my above list first aid, keep warm..ect unless you want
 

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Christian
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39,500 Posts
I’m not totally sure what you’re asking here.

Are you saying the only things we can bring are primitive devices?

If not then I would go the rout of the pioneers as far as basic equipment and augment that with the modern day equivalent gear that may last longer or do a better job.

Hope this helps.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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4,173 Posts
Hey TheWoodsman!

This topic isn't entertained by most people on this board. They regard it as impractical and unattainable, and will sometimes chide you for bringing it up. I'm not one of those people! This is one of my favorite topics, and I will happily talk at length with you about my experiences in this long-term living scenario. I'll give you a brief survey on what I've learned, and then address the question of what I carry!

I'm assuming, based on your gear list, that you're talking about long-term woods living out of a backpack, and not a humvee full of supplies. This is also my forte, and, in fact, I have taken long-term backpack living to the next level by pioneering lightweight long-term backpack living. I think the lightweight aspect is mandated by the miniscule ammount of calories you will find. If you're only taking in 800 calories a day, even if you wanted to, you're not gonna be hauling around a 40lb pack. I'm working on a 20lb limit, although I keep hovering between 20-28lbs.

I find food acquisition, preparation, and storage to be the largest obstacle to long-term backpack living. Calories are everywhere, and, if you're willing to expand your palate you can easily garner enough to get you through a day in a few hours. The fact that backpacking makes us transient complicates the issue of food preparation and storage, but actually helps the issue of food acquisition. So, while we may find more food because we are constantly moving, we will be able to store less of it because we can only carry so much. This means that our caloric buffer zone (how many days we can go without finding any food) is real small, and, the food that we do store will have to be prepared to be stored, which requires time. Time and calories are the currencies when you're talking extended primitive woods living, or long-term backpack living.

Bushcraft and indigenous living methods are also paramount to the task at hand. Since your calorie intake will limit the ammount of weight you can carry, you simply cannot carry enough shelter to see you through winters, and you must engage in bushcraft in order to survive. Likewise, since you cannot create food from thin air, you will need to learn indigenous methods of hunting, foraging, and plant identification. At first, this seems like an overwhelming task, and it is a lot of knowledge to learn, but find solace in the fact that indigenous peoples were capable of eeking out a living in almost every square inch of North America. So, with the right knowledge, so can you!

I suppose another main underlying theme is that, no matter how durable your gear is, it will eventually become unservicable. At that point, you will need to know how to bushcraft up a suitable replacement or do without it.

I have many, many, many, many, many more thoughts on the subject, and I apologize for not being able to adequately organize them, but I'm hungry to bounce ideas off of someone else who will entertain this idea in a rational and openminded fashion, so feel free to make some more posts on the subject or PM me. I think long-term backpack living is possible, but I think it will frequently come with a high suck-factor.

Regarding the gear I would take:

I bounce back and forth between favoring weight and time with my gear selection. On the one hand, if I set my gear up so that I can lay camp in a matter of 10 minutes, I can cover a lot more ground in a day of hiking. On the other hand, if I set my gear up so that I will have to bushcraftp up a shelter everywhere I want to sleep, I've just taken 4 hours out of my day, but also 15lbs out of my pack. In the same vein, my Katadyn Pocket Pro weighs 778g, which is fairly heavy for a single-function item, but it saves me the hour it would take to start a fire from scratch and boil water to drink, every time I want to drink.

My pack contents are always being revised, and, because this is a hobby for me, I still have many ideas I'd like to test out, which would involve different pieces of gear. But, these are some established items that I have found to be indispensible in my long-term backpacking ventures. I put these items through freqent hard use everytime I go out:

USGI Canteen, Cup, and Cover
Fully Enclosed Stainless Steel Container
Gerber LMF II
Fiskars retractable Saw
USGI Poncho
USGI Bivvy Bag
20L Sealine Drybag
Cordage - trotline, fishingline, paracord, tarred decoy line.
Fish hooks (Can be used for so many other things than fishing)
Bic Lighter / Firesteel
Wool!


My ultimate long-term backpack living pack will undoubtedly contain a few of those items, and a few others. That's the best answer I can give you right now, lol. :thumb:
 

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A couple small items you might want to add: a small sharpening stone (probably not necessary if you're only out there for a week) and a flashlight. The flashlight might seem like an unnecessary luxury for someone using primitive skills, but when you really need it it's nice to have. I've been caught up a mountain in the dark with a storm coming in and nothing for shelter, and I don't think I would have been able to get down without breaking an ankle if I hadn't had a flashlight with me (I know it was stupid to get in that situation in the first place, but we've all done idiotic stuff at one time or another). Also, I've been woken up at two in the morning with something large and slimy crawling over my face, and I don't think I would've been able to get back to sleep if I hadn't had a flashlight to see that it was just an especially big slug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, i agree most people think primitive skills are just that primitive but i study them and add a few modern comforts in and in a situation where i'd ever need to live long-term i'm sure i can. These skills though can be applied in short-term as well which most people would rather have thier bic lighter than know how to use a hand drill. That's fine and maybe 1 in 10,000 chance you'll need it in your life if your an avid camper but i like thses skills. Also i agree a flashlight is a nice item to have i do carry a crank light with me sometimes as well. Yeah i left out a few things i carry but like you said they change from time to time. If you'd ever like to chat about primitive living just PM me, likewise i always enjoy boucing ideas around. Thanks for replying.
 

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GB Hatchet, lot of matches plus a Bic, a couple bricks of 22 LR to feed a Ruger 10/22, good boots, good pants, good coat, Swedish Fire Steel, Leatherman Surge, awl and thread. I wouldn't go anywhere for very long without my fly-rod.
 

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Sky Soldier
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338 Posts
Do you mean turn of the last century gear or primitive picks?


Canvas Pack
Leather satchel
Canvas Tarp
Wool blanket
Steel Pot with lid, spoon and fork and Cast Oven or Skillet
Steel canteen or bota bags
Flint steel, char cloth tin with lens, and a couple beeswax candles
Knife, Stone
Musket, powder horn, swadge tools and balls
Axe, file
Map and compass
Horse and saddle, or canoe

and local knowledge
In the summer months, cotton and in the winter wool
 

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Keeper of Tomes
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1,704 Posts
I live in Georgia with a mix of swamp and decidous forests. If i had to i would bring.

Leather Bag, Leather Satchel
Wool Blanket and all wool clothing
High Plains Mocassins with replacement soles
Swedish Military Cook Pot
Firesteel. Char Cloth, Small canister to make more char cloth
Magnifing Glass
Ball Peen Hammer - I'm a decent blacksmith. With a ball peen hammer and a set of tongs i can fabricate most anything out of metal.
Small Blacksmithing Tongs
Small Leatherworking Kit
Knife, High Carbon, Stone
Machete, Stone
Map and Compass
Salt, Curing Salt, Brown Sugar, Gunny Sacks (Cooking Syringe as a luxury)
Pectin, Large bottle of Lemon Juice
SAS Survival Manual (Luxury)
100' 550 Cord (Luxury)

Depending on weight...

Axe
Cross Peen Hammer
Shovel or some kind of digging device

Basically everything i could think of that a mountain man from the 1800s or earlier would use. Not quite Primative but close.
 

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mountain man survival and homestead in the wilderness with a modern twist for two

(1) My girlfriend
(1) nessmuk trio(double bit hatchet, nessmuk knife, and a folding knife)
(2) snap-sack
(2) antler horn framed (oiled) large canvas pack
(4) leather pack satchel
(2) toiletries bag
(1) (oiled) wall tent canvas ropes and pegs
(1) small wood stove and stovepipe
(2) large oilcloth
(2) large sheep skin with wool (softened)
(1) caribou skin with hair *(softened)
(1) large bear skin with hair (oiled)
(2) deer skin with hair (oiled)
(2) pair of breakdown snowshoes
(9) bolts of wool yarn
(5) large wool blanket
(2) small pillow
(1) large axe and extra ash handle
(1) tomahawk
(1) heavy duty water filter and extra filters*
(3) canvas bucket
(1) small copper bucket
(4) bottle of castile soap*
(2) sewing kits
(6) bundles of rope
(6) bolts of thick hemp twine
(1) bolts of think hemp canvas
(2) different sized magnifying glasses with leather strap for telescope
(2) fire steel
(2) waterproof match holder
(2) bundle of char-cloth
(1) oil lantern
(1) oil lamp
(8) small bees wax candles
(8) linen sacks
(1) small can to make char-cloth
(9) pieces of flint
(2) copper cup
(2) tin plate
(2) iron fork
(2) wooden bowl
(2) small cast iron skillet with lid
(2) small dutch oven with recessed lid
(1) hang-able copper pot with pour spout and lid
(1) short cooking tri-pod
(1) medium ghillie kettle*
(2) wooden spoon (long handled)
(2) fixed blade hunting knife
(4) folding lock-back knifes
(1) crooked knife
(2) leather poncho
(2) oilcloth cloak
(2) pair leather work gloves
(2) bug head net*
(8) bota bag
(2) leather costrel
(2) sharpening stone
(1) set of sharpening files
(1) leather working kit
(2) mini fishing kit
(4) zippo hand warmer and fluid*
(8) reusable hot snap heater*
(2) machete
(1) pick axe
(2) breakdown shovel/hoe
(1) rechargeable spotlight*
(1) lead pouring equipment and lead
(2) powder horns
(1) .50 flint lock black powder rifle and loading equipment
(1) .50 flint lock black powder pistol and loading equipment
(1) .22 pak-rifle with scope and ammo*
(2) .45/.410 revolver with both kinds of ammo*
(1) sling bow with breakdown arrows with fishing reel and different ammo*
(1) takedown recurve bow with arrows
(4) extra rubbers for sling bow (60 lb. test)*
(4) maple syrup spigots
(1) small tongs and cross peen hammer and small bellows with blow tube and a strong magnet
(2) small gold panning kit
(8) pair of sunglasses*
(4) pair of moccasins
(2) pair of oiled/greased deerskin high boots
(2) pair of thick wool pants with (oiled) leather butt flap
(2) thick cotton long sleeve shirt
(2) thick wool long coat with hood and (oiled) leather back and shoulders
(2) wool gloves/mittens with (oiled) leather paw pads
(1) thick wool wide brim hat
(6) wool socks
(6) cotton short sleeve shirts
(4) pairs of hemp shorts
(2) maps and compass
(1) wind up pocket watch
(1) inflatable two person canoe with breakdown paddles and inflatable life vests helmets*
(6) inner tube*
(1) small air pump*
(2) pack rafts
(2) pack sled
(2) hand crank flashlight*
(1) harmonica
(2) survival seed pack sealed in mylar*
(2) bundle of cheese cloth
(8) small metal traps
(4) medium metal traps
(2) large metal traps
(1) 8x8 fishing net
(1) spool of snare wire
(1) jar of pine pitch
(2) journal and pencils
(2) first aid kit*
(2) flask of high grain alcohol
(1) small glass pipe and bic lighters*
(1) bottle of linseed oil
(1) set of 6 dice and list and rules of games
(1) hand crank mill
(1) hand crank oil press
(2) large one wheel trailer*
(1) set of opium tools
(2) hemp sprout bags
(1) bee smoker
(1) breakdown solar over
(1) canning supplies
(1) small butter churn
(3) dozen mason jars with lids and rings
(1) pressure cooker
(2) small pickling crock with wooden lid
(1) large pickling crock with wooden lid
(1) one gallon still with thumper
(6) half gallon thick glass bottles
(4) bubbler airlock*
(2) rolls of duct tape*
(1) tube of super glue*

SMALL LOG CABIN TOOLS

(1) large axe
(1) broad(hewing) axe
(1) cross cut saw
(1) draw knife
(1) mallet
(1) bark spud
(1) hand drill and bits
(1) furrow
(1)measuring tape
(1) set of chisels
(1) set of sharpening files
(2) rolls of bug screen*
(3) rolls of clear plastic sheeting*
(2) rolls of rubber sheeting and rubber cement*
(2) rolls of chicken wire*
(3) rolls of copper sheeting
(9) packs of large staples
(2) block and tackle

SUPPLIES

hardtack (pre-made)
pemmican (pre-made)
curing salt
brown sugar
salt pork(pre-made)
salt
pepper
whole wheat flour
rye flour
powdered milk
honey
multivitamins
liquid smoke
bread yeast
yeast starter and nutrient
beer yeast
rennet
peanut butter
wheat berries
dried veggies and fruits and meats
canned tuna
hard cheese
hard meats
dried pumpkin
dried seeds and nuts
parched corn (pre-made)
corn meal
coco powder
bakers chocolate
sweetened condensed milk
olive oil
spices
vanilla beans
paraffin wax
vinegar
baking powder
baking soda
.22 .45 .410 ammo lots of ammo
flintlock lead
reloading equipment
water enhancers( milo, tea, coffee hot chocolate)
iodine tablets
bleach
lots of TP cant have enough
chlorinated lime
matches
epson salt
candles wicks
lamp wicks
lamp oil
lemon juice
lime juice
cannaibs (pain relief)
opium (extreme pain relief)
black powder
small bottle of super-thrive

SURVIVAL BOOKS

wild edible foods guide
wild edible mushroom guide
survival poaching
wild medicine herb guide
first aid guide and field medicine
the humanure guide
wild food recipes
how to preserve what you harvest or hunt
wildwood wisdom
woodcraft and camping

SURVIVAL SEEDS

carrots
cucumbers
variety of potatoes
wheat
variety of corn
pumpkin
alfalfa
variety of legumes
variety of tomatoes
variety of onions
broccoli
cauliflower
kitchen herbs
variety of spices
variety of melons
variety of berries
variety of fruits
variety of greens
variety of cannabis
variety poppies
pepper plant
variety of peppers
variety of chilies
stevia rebaudiana
brown rice
variety of gourds
variety of mushrooms
roses
radishes
hops
oats
barley
sunflowers
yams
spirulina
chlorella
apple rose
green tea
variety of medicinal herbs
aloe
luffa vine
clover
alfalfa

SURVIVAL ANIMALS

pack/dairy goats
baby chicks
ferrets
meal worms
crickets
bee hive


I am sure I am missing lots of stuff and a lots of knowledge not goin tomorrow perhaps someday we will be ready just got to keep working for the dreams of a simple man
 

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This is an extremely interesting topic. I am however afraid to admit that my primitive skills are limited to some shelter building, and fire making. So I'd have to have an ax, folding saw, and a good bushcraft knife with me at least.

I have so much to learn about primitive living, and I really want to learn it, but I struggle with how to learn it right now. I have not even killed an animal, much less prepared it for cooking, ever. This skill alone is one that scares me a great deal. If the need arose tomorrow, I feel I'd be at a huge disadvantage. Sure I might be able to figure it out, but at what cost? This is a skill that I want to work really hard to acquire very soon. I have done fish, but they are rather easy, however not always available.

So let's keep this discussion going. Thanks for bringing it up Woodsman. Perhaps philosophy and reasoning behind some of the more exotic choices, like the blacksmith example above, would also be a good expansion of the topic of the gear list.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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4,173 Posts
Hey!

You know I'm down for continuing this conversation! :D:

It's interesting that you bring up hunting, Cragar. In traditional hunting and gathering tribes, hunting is taken on as a tribal activity, usually by the men, who will group up and leave home to go hunting. MOST tribes (The Adi of the himalayas are one exception that comes to mind) will cooperatively hunt -meaning they will work together in an organized fashion while they are hunting. These tribes consistently hunt big game and big predators. The tribes that DON'T work together cooperatively, all hunt small game.

Now, some people will say "I can get a deer all by my lonesome!", but we must remember It's not as if the tribes that hunt individually don't get big game occasionally, but that they SUSTAIN themselves (and their families) on small game.

I think the historical and indigenous lesson to be learned for those of us trying to learn how to live out of a backpack is that we're gonna have to hunt small game if we're going to be successful, and we're going to have to expand our pallates.

So, if you want to live out of a backpack:

1. Become intimately familiar with the behavior and habitats of all possible small-game animals you might encounter.
2. Get aquainted with the more "exotic" parts of the animal, because you really can't afford to waste the calories. lol. :thumb:
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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4,173 Posts
Oh! Another point I forgot to bring up!

If you study nomadic tribes, they don't aimlessly wander. They're intimately familiar with the land they travel, and migrate to preordained destinations as they follow seasonal resources.

Again, I think the lesson learned by this time-tempered behavior of preordained migration for those of us who want to live out of a backpack, is that each ecosystem we intend to wander through requires a VASTLY different knowledge-base and skillset than the previous ecosystem.

I know this idea seems basic and intuitive, but, for example, just wandering around Oregon I would encounter 4 major environments! If I were to wander from West to East, I'd have to know about the coastal, valley, mountain, and desert ecosystems.

That's a lot of knowledge, considering that in each ecosystem we've got to know how, when, and where to get water, which animals to hunt and when, which parts of what plants are available for harvest when...

...It's a lot to get started on!

I found something that has helped me tremendously is to make a list (with LOTS of writing space, lol) of the months of the year. Then, write in what plants and animals are available for harvest at what time of the year. :thumb:
 

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10 C's
1. cutting:
large bowie knife, sharpening stone, file, shovel, pruning saw, bow saw.
2. combustion:
waterproofed matches, bic lighter, flint, steel, steel wool, battery.
3. covers:
tarp, all weather blanket, poncho, roll of plastic
4. cordage:
para cord, twine
5. compass
primary compass and secondary compass
6. containers:
metal pot( for boiling water) canteen to carry water
7. cargo:
trash bags, mesh laundry bags, ziploc bags
8. critters:
snare kit, fishing kit
9. clean
towel, face towel, bar soap, small emergency first aid kit w/ snake bite kit
10. candles:
led headlamp, candles, flashlight.

and that should cover pretty much everything..
first thing to build is some type of shelter
then build /set traps for food.
get water
build fire

then booze
then hookers

any questions?
 

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mountain man survival and homestead in the wilderness with a modern twist for two

(1) My girlfriend
(1) nessmuk trio(double bit hatchet, nessmuk knife, and a folding knife)
(2) snap-sack
(2) antler horn framed (oiled) large canvas pack
(4) leather pack satchel
(2) toiletries bag
(1) (oiled) wall tent canvas ropes and pegs
(1) small wood stove and stovepipe
(2) large oilcloth
(2) large sheep skin with wool (softened)
(1) caribou skin with hair *(softened)
(1) large bear skin with hair (oiled)
(2) deer skin with hair (oiled)
(2) pair of breakdown snowshoes
(9) bolts of wool yarn
(5) large wool blanket
(2) small pillow
(1) large axe and extra ash handle
(1) tomahawk
(1) heavy duty water filter and extra filters*
(3) canvas bucket
(1) small copper bucket
(4) bottle of castile soap*
(2) sewing kits
(6) bundles of rope
(6) bolts of thick hemp twine
(1) bolts of think hemp canvas
(2) different sized magnifying glasses with leather strap for telescope
(2) fire steel
(2) waterproof match holder
(2) bundle of char-cloth
(1) oil lantern
(1) oil lamp
(8) small bees wax candles
(8) linen sacks
(1) small can to make char-cloth
(9) pieces of flint
(2) copper cup
(2) tin plate
(2) iron fork
(2) wooden bowl
(2) small cast iron skillet with lid
(2) small dutch oven with recessed lid
(1) hang-able copper pot with pour spout and lid
(1) short cooking tri-pod
(1) medium ghillie kettle*
(2) wooden spoon (long handled)
(2) fixed blade hunting knife
(4) folding lock-back knifes
(1) crooked knife
(2) leather poncho
(2) oilcloth cloak
(2) pair leather work gloves
(2) bug head net*
(8) bota bag
(2) leather costrel
(2) sharpening stone
(1) set of sharpening files
(1) leather working kit
(2) mini fishing kit
(4) zippo hand warmer and fluid*
(8) reusable hot snap heater*
(2) machete
(1) pick axe
(2) breakdown shovel/hoe
(1) rechargeable spotlight*
(1) lead pouring equipment and lead
(2) powder horns
(1) .50 flint lock black powder rifle and loading equipment
(1) .50 flint lock black powder pistol and loading equipment
(1) .22 pak-rifle with scope and ammo*
(2) .45/.410 revolver with both kinds of ammo*
(1) sling bow with breakdown arrows with fishing reel and different ammo*
(1) takedown recurve bow with arrows
(4) extra rubbers for sling bow (60 lb. test)*
(4) maple syrup spigots
(1) small tongs and cross peen hammer and small bellows with blow tube and a strong magnet
(2) small gold panning kit
(8) pair of sunglasses*
(4) pair of moccasins
(2) pair of oiled/greased deerskin high boots
(2) pair of thick wool pants with (oiled) leather butt flap
(2) thick cotton long sleeve shirt
(2) thick wool long coat with hood and (oiled) leather back and shoulders
(2) wool gloves/mittens with (oiled) leather paw pads
(1) thick wool wide brim hat
(6) wool socks
(6) cotton short sleeve shirts
(4) pairs of hemp shorts
(2) maps and compass
(1) wind up pocket watch
(1) inflatable two person canoe with breakdown paddles and inflatable life vests helmets*
(6) inner tube*
(1) small air pump*
(2) pack rafts
(2) pack sled
(2) hand crank flashlight*
(1) harmonica
(2) survival seed pack sealed in mylar*
(2) bundle of cheese cloth
(8) small metal traps
(4) medium metal traps
(2) large metal traps
(1) 8x8 fishing net
(1) spool of snare wire
(1) jar of pine pitch
(2) journal and pencils
(2) first aid kit*
(2) flask of high grain alcohol
(1) small glass pipe and bic lighters*
(1) bottle of linseed oil
(1) set of 6 dice and list and rules of games
(1) hand crank mill
(1) hand crank oil press
(2) large one wheel trailer*
(1) set of opium tools
(2) hemp sprout bags
(1) bee smoker
(1) breakdown solar over
(1) canning supplies
(1) small butter churn
(3) dozen mason jars with lids and rings
(1) pressure cooker
(2) small pickling crock with wooden lid
(1) large pickling crock with wooden lid
(1) one gallon still with thumper
(6) half gallon thick glass bottles
(4) bubbler airlock*
(2) rolls of duct tape*
(1) tube of super glue*

SMALL LOG CABIN TOOLS

(1) large axe
(1) broad(hewing) axe
(1) cross cut saw
(1) draw knife
(1) mallet
(1) bark spud
(1) hand drill and bits
(1) furrow
(1)measuring tape
(1) set of chisels
(1) set of sharpening files
(2) rolls of bug screen*
(3) rolls of clear plastic sheeting*
(2) rolls of rubber sheeting and rubber cement*
(2) rolls of chicken wire*
(3) rolls of copper sheeting
(9) packs of large staples
(2) block and tackle

SUPPLIES

hardtack (pre-made)
pemmican (pre-made)
curing salt
brown sugar
salt pork(pre-made)
salt
pepper
whole wheat flour
rye flour
powdered milk
honey
multivitamins
liquid smoke
bread yeast
yeast starter and nutrient
beer yeast
rennet
peanut butter
wheat berries
dried veggies and fruits and meats
canned tuna
hard cheese
hard meats
dried pumpkin
dried seeds and nuts
parched corn (pre-made)
corn meal
coco powder
bakers chocolate
sweetened condensed milk
olive oil
spices
vanilla beans
paraffin wax
vinegar
baking powder
baking soda
.22 .45 .410 ammo lots of ammo
flintlock lead
reloading equipment
water enhancers( milo, tea, coffee hot chocolate)
iodine tablets
bleach
lots of TP cant have enough
chlorinated lime
matches
epson salt
candles wicks
lamp wicks
lamp oil
lemon juice
lime juice
cannaibs (pain relief)
opium (extreme pain relief)
black powder
small bottle of super-thrive

SURVIVAL BOOKS

wild edible foods guide
wild edible mushroom guide
survival poaching
wild medicine herb guide
first aid guide and field medicine
the humanure guide
wild food recipes
how to preserve what you harvest or hunt
wildwood wisdom
woodcraft and camping

SURVIVAL SEEDS

carrots
cucumbers
variety of potatoes
wheat
variety of corn
pumpkin
alfalfa
variety of legumes
variety of tomatoes
variety of onions
broccoli
cauliflower
kitchen herbs
variety of spices
variety of melons
variety of berries
variety of fruits
variety of greens
variety of cannabis
variety poppies
pepper plant
variety of peppers
variety of chilies
stevia rebaudiana
brown rice
variety of gourds
variety of mushrooms
roses
radishes
hops
oats
barley
sunflowers
yams
spirulina
chlorella
apple rose
green tea
variety of medicinal herbs
aloe
luffa vine
clover
alfalfa

SURVIVAL ANIMALS

pack/dairy goats
baby chicks
ferrets
meal worms
crickets
bee hive


I am sure I am missing lots of stuff and a lots of knowledge not goin tomorrow perhaps someday we will be ready just got to keep working for the dreams of a simple man
What are opium tools?
 

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What are opium tools?
For the opium dude has listed.

Yeppers, I guess for some, chasing the dragon, which involves laying about for hours or perhaps days, deteriorating, is a solid survivalist skill.

Anyone can post here, including those who believe pot and smack are necessary for survival.
 

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tools that I know of

opium tools are basically a razor blade and a spoon but can find them as antiques around the net let me be clear I would never do anything illegal this is just a thought to fill a niche that needs to be filled that being long term pain management as I know someone who has a bad back and M.S. without a doc a around I dont want them to be in any pain its gunna be hard enough for them
 

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For the opium dude has listed.

Yeppers, I guess for some, chasing the dragon, which involves laying about for hours or perhaps days, deteriorating, is a solid survivalist skill.

Anyone can post here, including those who believe pot and smack are necessary for survival.
well the look on my aunts face when she doesnt have her meds due to a really bad M.S. I guess I would do about anything to make that pain go away for her this has NOTHING to do with drugs for fun this is for real @ least a good thing to keep in mind I think u can doctor yourself @ least til u can find a doc that can help with ur $1000 RX which r the same chemicals that I speak of
 

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well the look on my aunts face when she doesnt have her meds due to a really bad M.S. I guess I would do about anything to make that pain go away for her this has NOTHING to do with drugs for fun this is for real @ least a good thing to keep in mind I think u can doctor yourself @ least til u can find a doc that can help with ur $1000 RX which r the same chemicals that I speak of
And how far will she get with that bug out bag? This is a post about being rugged and independent and as unfortunate as your aunt is, that's not relevant to this discussion. We could go into folks on dialysis and those needing O2 tanks if you wish but they'd also be irrelevant to this topic.

Where is dude going to get the opium to process into heroin for his self medication once things collapse?
 
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