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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to begin some long term food storage and I have a few questions. I'm looking to store rice and beans. Reading up on various sites has storage using dry ice. Do I have to use dry ice or can I use oxygen absorbers?

As far as mylar bags where can I get them? K-Mart, Costco/BJ Wholesale?

Finally can I store any bean or is there a specific bean that stores the longest and has the best protein?

Thanks for your input!

Raul
 

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http://www.sorbentsystems.com/mylar.html

I got the food storage special. It will keep me supplied for a while.

I just got a variety of beans, in a ratio of roughly 3 pounds of rice per pound of beans.
I ordered from Sorbent Systems over two weeks ago, and they still haven't arrived. Every other vendor I ordered from that same day shipped promptly.
I don't know what the deal is, but I think I may try the https://www.usaemergencysupply.com website instead--they shipped quickly.

For size, you'd use the 20" by 30": https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/emergency_supplies/food_storage_equipment.htm
 

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"Wendy Mae" and "Frugal Squirrel" (same people), and "USA Emergency Supply", both are good sources, good people to work with.

Sarah is a good source of information as previously stated. The USA Emergency supply web site has on line information pages, good reading. There are several good "how-to" videos on line. Also, using your wife's clothes iron will save you the cost of an expensive heat sealer, actually works better.

This topic has been posted several times before, so could use the "search" function to get to those post as well.
 

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Forget the dry ice, that was the best we had 20 years ago, times have changed, oxygen absorbers are the way to go now.

Before you go and just buy pinto beans and rice, maybe you should pick a mix of dried beans and peas for storage. For example, think of the preparation time (fuel consumption) for pinto beans, with an overnight soak and HOURS of cooking time, yikes! If these are your EOTWAWKI food supplies, think about the fuel requirements. Buy some Lentils as they will cook faster, that sort of thing. Use your pressure cooker, and reduce the pinto bean cook time to 1/3 of normal (without the pressure cooker), and save that fuel, you will need it.

Both the suppliers noted above also have one gallon sized bags as well. Think how you will use your stored food. A 5 gallon bucket of food will take a LONG time to use up. Maybe you should pack some smaller packages of pasta, peas, etc., to add variety to your long term food storage program. Just another idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
ken,

thanks for the information!

So far I have 48 MRE's (4 cases of Sure Pak), I plan on getting some meal bars, and the 5 gal buckets will be if things get real bad. I'm looking to keep me, my girl and her kid fed for about a few months if the SHTF until I can find a means to get more.

storage is limited as I live in an apartment, getting a BOL is basically non-existent on Long Island, and getting off the island if the crap does fly will be extremely difficult due to the masses heading west. My only option right now is to stock up with what I can with my limited income and buckle down, lock n load and wait until the dust settles.

I understand your comment about fuel consumption and I will take that into consideration before I begin to buy the food.
 

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even more

There are several information sources on line, but one in particular I know has been posted here for download. The "LDS preparedness handbook", has a list of foods with recommendations about storage life etc. It is not perfect source, but a fair starting point. The truth is that oxygen absorbers are relatively new on the market for us home food storage types, thus there are no set rules, only guidelines about what item will store for how long. We will all have to learn as we go. Good luck
 

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Maybe I'm wrong.....but what about a food saver? You could seal them each in 5lb(or so) increments and stuff them into your 5 gallon bucket.
 

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You could use it, but it would not work quite as well. The oxygen absorbers if correctly sized to the package will remove ALL the oxygen, not just reduce the amount as with vacuum sealing methods. The real question is how much is good enough? A vacuum sealer should provide great storage life for dry items, but not as long as totally removing the oxygen. I don't have a god answer for the difference in storage time, may be close enough for your use. Grain can be stored for years (grain silo) with not much more than just reducing the moisture content and keeping the rats out.

Some people bag smaller amounts, meal sized portions in smaller bags (not tightly sealed) and place those in the 5 gallon bags with oxygen absorbers. The only problem would be if two of the items stored together had significantly different basic storage properties, such that one thing was going bad while the rest remained fresh.
 

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I read on here that one can use a grain mill to grind beans, and thereby reduce prep time (i.e., bean flour to become refried beans). Is that a viable idea?
 

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I posted the re-fried bean entry, at least one of them, maybe someone else did as well. It works, but may not appeal to everyone, the idea of bean mush, ha.

Just make sure you cook the beans long enough to get all the toxins out. You can read about the heat requirement to remove toxins in beans by reading the Wikipedia article.
 

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The inexpensive corn grinders will break the beans up or reduce them to dust with multiple passes. You would probably just break them up with a single pass such that the pieces would cook faster.

If you ground them to dust the cook time may actually be too short (say with a pressure cooker) to make a generic statement about all beans being cooked long enough. Kidney beans supposedly take 30 minutes, something like that to have enough time at temperature to break down the toxins. The toxins give ya a tummy ache if not all gone

It took me 3-4 passes to grind corn into corn meal fine enough to use for that purpose to give you an idea.
 

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correction

I looked up the wikipedia article on beans to refresh my memory, here is what they said (below).

Some kinds of raw beans and especially red and kidney beans, contain a harmful toxin (the lectin Phytohaemagglutinin) that must be destroyed by cooking. A recommended method is to boil the beans for at least ten minutes; undercooked beans may be more toxic than raw beans. Cooking beans in a slow cooker, because of the lower temperatures often used, may not destroy toxins even though the beans do not smell or taste 'bad' (though this should not be a problem if the food reaches boiling and stays there for some time).

I just wanted to get across the idea that someone might try grinding any bean, not heat it sufficiently, and get a tummy ache. However, it looks to be less of a problem that I had remembered, if the temperature is high enough you are OK, and boiling, or pressure cooking would keep the temperature high enough for 10 minutes, so maybe it is a non issue
 
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