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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am thinking about trying my hand at building one for myself and my future wife. We are young and I am physically able so I think why not? I could ave alot of money doing all the work myself and then turn around and sell the house when we are ready to move on. Does anyone know much about log homes? I am having a hard time finding alot of information about things like insulation and other build specific projects. The only real heavy expense I think I will be paying for is the foundation. I will have that professionally done and do the rest myself. Good idea? Bad Idea? What say you? Thanks for your help!
 

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Let me first ask WHERE it is being built. some states have rules about such. Look into this. There are some log home building schools in the US that offer week long courses. And also check out some log home shows. Start buying some log and timber home magazines. RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH first.

If your gonna cut and shave your own trees then i hope you realize you should let them air dry for about 2 years OFF the ground. Othewrwise you gotta pay for kiln drying and that doesnt get all the moisture out of the wood.

Also research the various wood types and find out how they act in the area you wanna build.

These few thoughts should keep you busy for now. keep us posted.

I have been researching this same subject for about 2 years now.... The more i research it the more i realize i dont know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am shooting to build it in Western North Carolina(most likley the case) or Upstate SC. I have 4 years until I actually want to build. So I have plenty of time to research and let them dry hah.

I have been considering doing the butt and pass method. Where the logs will come down on rebar that has been embedded in the foundation walls.

Do you know of any good websites for information about log homes or ones that are specific to log homes. I found one but all they do is tell you to go to the class they offer which is not an option for me at the time. Ill keep looking and researchingThanks for any help!
 

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There are a bunch of contractors around here who make 'log homes' for tourists. We have a big industry around out-of-state people who own camps in the woods, many of them want a log cabin.

They are super hard to heat.
 

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I lived in a Log home in Fairbanks Ak. I lived in it for 3 years. I didn't find it harder to heat at -70 below 0 then my friends stick built house. My home was around 50 yrs old and built by hand by the owner of the property it was on. It might have just been built correctly or I was just lucky. But myself I would not hesitate to live in another out in the badlands. There are many good plans on the net and people that will answer questions on building them. Just keep researching it.:thumb:
 

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log homes require a great deal of planning, once you have the log in place it is very difficult if not impossable to go back and fix something. you have to have the entire electrical and plumbing in mind before you lay the first log. the higher you go the more you need to engineer how you are going to get the logs in place. the notching style will make a huge difference on the quality of the finished job and also the time needed. if you plan on using logs for the floor joist and rafters than you have a whole bunch of leveling issues to overcome. the good news is it will be something you can take pride in when it is finished. you do need to check local codes in order to insure you don't get started and have to tear it all down again because you can't get a permit. feel free to pm me with any questions.
 

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Depends on the size of the log as to how hard it will be to build yourself. You can easily use logs well over 2ft around 'cut on site'. The logs will gently settle over time and the base needs to be on permanent screw jacks as well as windows and doors must allow for settling (space above them). Other than that, you'll have to do some further research on your own. My uncle in yosemite can build an entire house, furniture and staircase included, with nothing but a chainsaw. I saw a smaller one he did out of cedar with a staircase that was really pretty and he has done oak too.
 
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