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Ok I grew up playing with snakes and have one siting in a tank in my room now.
the easiest way to tell if you got bite by a venomous snake is the amount of puncture marks.

a bunch of teeth marks = non-venomous
Two puncture marks = venomous
 

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Ok I grew up playing with snakes and have one siting in a tank in my room now.
the easiest way to tell if you got bite by a venomous snake is the amount of puncture marks.

a bunch of teeth marks = non-venomous
Two puncture marks = venomous
I don't buy that. If I get tagged by a snake, Im not going to think "oh geez, thats a bunch of teeth.. im fine"

What I will do is shoot that MFer and take him with me to the ER. Let the herpatologists determine what kind it is..
 

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Contego Libertas
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I don't buy that. If I get tagged by a snake, Im not going to think "oh geez, thats a bunch of teeth.. im fine"

What I will do is shoot that MFer and take him with me to the ER. Let the herpatologists determine what kind it is..
When you never see the snake at all there's not much else to go on. You can't shoot what you never see.
 

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When I was in middle school & high school, I used to volunteer for a herpetologist that did travelling exhibits at schools throughout the area.

Two puncture wounds doesn't necessarily mean venomous. Lots of snakes have "fangs" that are longer than the rest of the teeth, but are non-venomous. I've been bitten by these non-venomous snakes dozens, maybe hundreds of times, and they leave two tiny dots of blood every time.

Copperheads bite more people than any other venomous snake in the U.S. Fortunately copperhead venom is fairly weak compared to many others common in the U.S. Children and small animals are at a high risk of death. Death doesn't usually occur in adults even if untreated, unless the bite isnear the head or chest area (as was the case here).

Water Moccassin (aka "Cottonmouth) venom is more damaging than the copperhead and definitely requires medical attention. Especially to the chest like that. If it was a cottonmouth bite I'm surprised he lasted that long -- the pain would have been excruciating.
 

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Geronimo!
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Snakes have a ton of bacteria in their mouths, regardless of whether they are venomous or not.

We were in Panama one time and a guy got bit by a Boa, a guy named Getz. Nastiest bite I've ever seen, animal or reptile. And he was treated pretty quickly with antibiotics by our medic but ended up having to be medivacted-out to Panama City.

If you can die from infection from a bad tooth, I would think it completely possible to receive an infection from any reptile that could get into your system and attack a heart valve or something.

We have a ton of poisonous and non-poisonous snakes in this area. Several different species of rattlers, plus cottonmouths, copperheads, eastern coral snakes and too many so-called non-poisonous snakes to list.

We learn to watch for them here ... in the bushes along the lake and riverbanks, under houses, in well houses, brush piles, etc. You just do not step or reach where you cannot see in their environment.

I have a snake phobia. I've had them right in my face and have never gotten used to them.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well the most common snake in the area where this guy got bit is copperheads. He got bitten in the chest which would be fatal if left untreated such as here. He also had 2 puncture wounds which would indicate a venomous snake but Im no expert:rolleyes:

You just never know, I nearly died from drinking water from a spring in a cave which had bats in it and got histoplasmosis.
 

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Contego Libertas
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Water Moccassin (aka "Cottonmouth) venom is more damaging than the copperhead and definitely requires medical attention. Especially to the chest like that. If it was a cottonmouth bite I'm surprised he lasted that long -- the pain would have been excruciating.
Water Moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorous) and Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) are very closely related. Their young and juveniles are even sometimes misidentified as the other. Many people falsely believe about one species as being more toxic than another. While an equal amount of venom is more toxic than the other, this can be affected by other factors. One thing that COULD happen is dry bites (This case was NOT a dry bite), or the water Moccasin could have used venom more than a Copperhead and the Copperhead could then deliver more venom. So in this case the Copperhead bite would be more dangerous than the Moccasin's. In any case, it's better safe than sorry. One snake bite specialist(Maynard H Cox - Jacksonville, Fla.) gave this advice when I gave snake lectures/demonstrations:

Don't cut, Don't suck the venom. Treat for shock and get to a hospital ASAP.
Now let me explain those....
Don't Cut = You could do more damage than good by cutting. In some places arteries are fairly close to the surface, cut one of those bad enough and the snakebite is the least of your concerns. You could bleed to death long before the venom could kill you.
Don't Suck the venom = You might not realize it but you could have open sores in your mouth. I.E. Fever blisters, you could bite your tongue or cheek in your sleep, and last but not least... When you brush your teeth without realizing it the bristles Could cause Minute scratches on your gums. If you suck the venom and it gets in one of those all you've done is added to the problem, because you now have two places that are envenomated. The bite and your mouth.
Treat for shock = Shock in many cases is dangerous. It COULD kill faster than anything else if not treated. People who are allergic or especially susceptible could die from anaphalyctic shock(sp?). Keep the bite Lower than the heart no matter where it is, unless it's the neck or head. Regardless of the case get to the hospital NOW! Don't pass "Go", Don't swing by the house to get anyone... Go to the Hospital NOW.

When/if you are bitten, if at all possible take the DEAD snake with you(No LIVE snakes please! You are putting others in danger!). This will help them Correctly ID the snake species that bit you and allow them to treat with the right antivenin. Some snakes have venom that affect the nervous system(Neuro toxin Like Cobra's and Coral snakes) others affect the blood and organs(Hemo toxin Like Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake, Water Moccasin, Copperhead) and some have both neural and hemo toxins.(Like the Black tail Rattlesnake IIRC) Hope this helps folks. There may be newer info out but that's the basics.
 

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I'm not a snakes expert but snakes and spider and well most reptiles and insects is one of my interests. I know most snake in our country, their habitat and which is poisons and not.

When a snake bites you regardless if poisons if not snakebites generally needs treatment to prevent infection. Many teeth marks are not poisons but can still have nasty effect. There are many non poisons snake that can also leave only two puncher mark, but poisons snakes have a very painful bite being the poison entering the body. Non poisons snakes that leave two punchers is most times less painful then a mouse bite but should still not be left untreated. It is just an indication of how urgent medical treatment is painful bite means that seconds matter not so painful means that though you have time treatment should still be given.

This sadly does not count for insects especially spider as some poisons spider can actually have a non painful bite they are generally cytotoxic where it attack the skin tissue as where a painful spider bite may indicate neurotoxic that attack the nerve which will generally cause your breathing to be laboured and so on until your nerves system shuts down eventually stopping you heart.
 

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We had a swimmin hole when I was a kid that we'd go to. Had to keep our eyes open for those damn cottonmouths all the time and despite the fact that we did at least once a summer someone would have to go to the hospital from being bitten. I feel badly for the family!
 
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