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I'm trying to put together a list of meds (primarily pill form) that would make sense to include in my preps. I've searched through this forum and found various lists, references and discussions, but I couldn't find a single comprehensive list, so I took a stab at creating one. Note that this list assumes no pre-existing medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, severe allergies, etc.) and is targeted at reasonably healthy adults. Yes, I realize that a number of these require a prescription, and yes, I realize that you need to be well-versed in how and when to use each of them, and yes, I do realize that there are natural/herbal alternatives for many of them.

Pain
- Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin)
- Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
- Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin)
- Caffeine tablets (use with Acetaminophen/Aspirin to enhance effectiveness)
Antibiotics
- Amoxicllin
- Ciprofloxacin
- Cephalexin
- Metronidazole
- Doxycycline
- Ampicillin
- Clindamycin
- Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprin
Anti-fungal
- Fluconazole
Flu
- Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)
Corticosteroids
- Corticosteroids
- Hydrocortisone (Cortef)
- Cortisone
- Deltasone, also called prednisone epocrates
Anti-diarrheal
- loperamide (Imodium)
- bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol)
Antihistamines
- Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
- fexofenadine (Allegra)
- levocetirizine (Xyzal)
- loratadine (Claritin, Alavert)
- Brompheniramine (Dimetapp allergy, Nasahist B)
- chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
- clemastine (Tavist)
- diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Decongestants
- Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
Cough
- Guaifenesin (Expectorant)
- Dextromethorphan (Suppressant)
Radiation
- Potassium Iodate (KIO3)

Am I missing anything?

Thanks
 

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Am I missing anything?
Yes, their wild/or garden herbal equivalents for deep SHTF situations when you run out of all these pills...

It may be a good thing to carefully explore with experienced wildcrafters and herbalists. (Just because it is natural does not mean it is "safe." There are lots of poisonous look-alikes. Due diligence is needed.)
 

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King of Canada
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Yes, their wild/or garden herbal equivalents for deep SHTF situations when you run out of all these pills...

It may be a good thing to carefully explore with experienced wildcrafters and herbalists. (Just because it is natural does not mean it is "safe." There are lots of poisonous look-alikes. Due diligence is needed.)
^This. This is far more sustainable.

Because you will run out of pills.
 

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I'm trying to put together a list of meds (primarily pill form) that would make sense to include in my preps. I've searched through this forum and found various lists, references and discussions, but I couldn't find a single comprehensive list, so I took a stab at creating one. Note that this list assumes no pre-existing medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, severe allergies, etc.) and is targeted at reasonably healthy adults. Yes, I realize that a number of these require a prescription, and yes, I realize that you need to be well-versed in how and when to use each of them, and yes, I do realize that there are natural/herbal alternatives for many of them.

Pain
- Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin)
- Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
- Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin)
- Caffeine tablets (use with Acetaminophen/Aspirin to enhance effectiveness)
Antibiotics
- Amoxicllin
- Ciprofloxacin
- Cephalexin
- Metronidazole
- Doxycycline
- Ampicillin
- Clindamycin
- Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprin
Anti-fungal
- Fluconazole
Flu
- Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)
Corticosteroids
- Corticosteroids
- Hydrocortisone (Cortef)
- Cortisone
- Deltasone, also called prednisone epocrates
Anti-diarrheal
- loperamide (Imodium)
- bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol)
Antihistamines
- Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
- fexofenadine (Allegra)
- levocetirizine (Xyzal)
- loratadine (Claritin, Alavert)
- Brompheniramine (Dimetapp allergy, Nasahist B)
- chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
- clemastine (Tavist)
- diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Decongestants
- Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
Cough
- Guaifenesin (Expectorant)
- Dextromethorphan (Suppressant)
Radiation
- Potassium Iodate (KIO3)

Am I missing anything?

Thanks
Did anyone at all see the part of the OP highlighted in red above? This is a list of medications to have on hand, IN CONJUNCTION WITH non-commercial DIY options such as herbals, which is a separate subject best addressed by someone that knows what they are doing.

Below are my thoughts on the subject, plus some suggestions made by an MD sympathetic to my request for guidance. His list should take precedence over mine if there are any conflicts.

Do you own due diligence research.

(I have included my thoughts on alternatives, just to prime the pump, so to speak. But the main thrust of the thread is not DIY, it is stocking medications and treatments available now.


My thoughts on stocking medications and treatments for the PAW

Items to keep in bulk (small containers, however)
• Rubbing alcohol
• Hydrogen peroxide
• Petroleum jelly
• Skin lotion
• Vinegar
• Baking soda
• Table salt
• Epsom salt
• Aloe-vera juice

Sun/Heat/Exposure
• Salt tablets: (Use with caution, and only with copious amounts of water)(It is much better to use formulated rehydration tablets, powders, or drinks.)
• Rehydration tablets/powder
• Sports type vitamin/mineral/electrolyte drink

Eye/Ear/Dental
• Eye ointment: yellow oxide of mercury 1% ophthalmic
• Eye anti-irritant: Tetrahydrozline drops (sterile solution of tetrahydrozoline hc1 .05%, sodium borate, boric acid, sodium chloride, benzalkonium chloride .01%, ethylene diamine tetraacetate .1%)
• Ear drops: Schein Otic drops (formulation of chloroxlenol, henzalkonlum chloride, acetic acid & glycerine)
• Tooth pain: Clove oil (Does burn slightly on application. Children might not use it very well or willingly)
• Dental: Eugenol or oil of cloves
• Dental: Powdered zinc oxide
• Toothache ointment: favorite brand, several
• Lip balm: favorite brand, several

Colds/Flu Symptoms
• Throat lozenges/cough drops: favorite brand/selection
• Cough medication (liquid): favorite brand/selection
• Cold remedy (liquid/tablet): favorite brand/selection
• Decongestant: Vicks vapor rub
• Vitamin C

Topical/Skin/Burns
• Anti-fungal: Tinactin cream (1% tolnaftate cream)
• Anti-inflammation/anti-itch: Hydrocortisone 1/2% cream
• Anti-burn/anti-itch/topical anesthetic: Dibucaine 1% ointment
• Antibiotic ointment: Triple Antibiotic Ointment (per gram: bacitracin-400 units, neomycin sulfate-5mg, polymyxin b sulfate-5000 units)
• Skin healant ointment: Vitamin A & D ointment (lanolin-petrolatum base) (1st degree burns, diaper rash, dry skin)
• Sun screen: zinc oxide ointment
• Burn irrigation solution: Mild saline solution
• Burn liquid loss replacement drink: sodium chloride/bicarbanate powder (mix w/water & drink after burns to help replace surface liquid loss)

Pain/Inflammation
• Pain/anti-inflammation: aspirin, Aspirin 325mg and 81mg
• Tylenol (be aware of liver problems
• Motrin 200 mg (therapeutic does is 2 every 4 hours, or 3 every 6 hours)
• Pain/muscle relaxant/tranquilizer: Percogesic tablets (325mg acetaminophen w/30mg phenyltoloxamine citrate)

Muscle Aches/Pains
• Heat balm: favorite brand, several

Breathing
• Antihistamine: chlorpheniramine maleate 4mg tablets
• Decongestant/vasoconstrictor: pseudoephedrine hydrochloride 30mg tablets
• Decongestant: Afrin nasal spray (oxymetazoline hydrochloride 0.05%)

Stomach/Intestine/Bowel
• Antacid: Dimacid tablets
• Anti-indigestion /nausea/diarrhea: Pepto-Bismol tablets(bismuth subsalicylate) (no sugar)
• Laxative: Bisacodyl 5mg tablets (Dulcolax, Thera-lax, Bon-o-Lax) (does not enter milk of nursing mothers)
• Anti-diarrhea: Imodium
• Metamucil: (adsorbs liquid)
• Anti-nausea/motion: meclizine hydrochloride 25mg tablets
• Vomit inducer (after poisoning): syrup of ipecac (check with your doctor as this has fallen out of favor) (not for use if strychnine, corrosives (alkalis [lye]) or strong acids), petroleum distillates such as kerosene, gasoline, coal oil, fuel oil, paint thinner or cleaning fluid have been ingested)

Female Specific
• PMS control medication: (several brands)
• Acidophilus pills (for women before taking antibiotics that could cause yeast infections)
• Miconazole (for yeast infections)
• Laxative: Bisacodyl 5mg tablets (Dulcolax, Thera-lax, Bon-o-Lax) (does not enter milk of nursing mothers)

Prescription Medications & Treatments
• Normal supply of current use prescriptions
• Normal supply of constant use non-prescription items (blood/urine test strips, etc.)

• 3-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items
• 14-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items
• 30-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items

• Post disaster emergency-use-only prescriptions (returned to doctor in sealed container periodically for inspection to verify non-abuse) (upon expiration date returned to doctor for disposal and issuance of new prescription)

• syringes (in areas where prescriptions are required)
• prescription dental extraction pain reliever (injectable)
• prescription local anesthetic (injectable)
• prescription multi-use narcotic (codeine)(oral/injectable)
• prescription severe pain reliever (oral/injectable)
• prescription muscle relaxant (oral/injectable)
• prescription tranquilizer (oral/injectable)
• prescription broad spectrum antibiotic (oral/injectable)
• IV solutions & equipment (D5W, saline, Ringer's lactate solution, glucose, blood expander, blood plasma)
• 50 cc 50% dextrose for hypoglycemia
• Other items as personal physician recommends and suggests for post disaster use

Specific RX possibilities
• Cipro 500 mg. Anti bacterial infection (x90)
• Morphine - pain
• Epinephrine - allergic reactions
• Lidocaine, injectable – dental/suturing pain
• Lidocaine, topical – skin surface pain/suturing pain
• Diazepam - sedative/muscle relaxant
• Ketamine - anasthetic
• Dexamethasone sod phos inj 4mg/ml - steroid anti-inflammatory
• Naproxin sulfate – anti-inflammatory
• Phenoxymethyl penicillin pen vk 500mg - antibiotic
• Clindamycin 300mg - anti biotic
• Codeine - many uses

Some doctor recommendations:
Skin treatments:
• Anti fungal: clotrimazole, miconazole (vaginal cream and ointment)
• Anti-inflammatory: cortisone 1%, calamine lotion
• Sun screen: UVA/UVB, SPF 30, & with avobenzone, or one of the occlusive, such as zinc oxide
• Antibiotic: triple antibiotic (Polysporin)
• Lip protection: choose high SPF, and moisturizer.

Burn treatments:
• Thermal burns: sterile saline for rinse, in pressurized cans, or the IV bottle. Cool sterile water can also be used.
• Dressings: I have used Silvadene, even though there is some controversy, hydrogel burn pads are effective, and today I would choose them.

Eye treatments:
• Neosporin ophthalmic
• Cipro ophthalmic
• Poly pred.

Ear treatments:
• Domeboro otic
• Neomycin and polymyxin b sulfates
• Hydrocortisone otic

Allergy treatments:
• Antihistamine: Benadryl oral (OTC) parental:50 mg diphenhydramine hydrochloride/milliliter
• steroids: Medrol dose pac (5 day decreasing dose of steroid), solu-cortef, (500 mg/2 ml) or solumedrol (500 mg/4 ml) for iv or im use in severe allergic reaction. These have to be made up in the vial-- dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, usp 4 mg/ml and 10 mg/ml, also has to be made up. (steroids can also be used as anti-inflammatories, either orally, by injection im, or by injection into a joint.)
• Epinephrine: epi-pen, or epinephrine 0.3 to 0.5 cc. Of 1:1,000 solution im. These are in ampules, and i have seen last 10 years.

Pain medications:
• Aspirin 325mg and 81mg strengths (pain and anti-inflammatory
• Tylenol
• Motrin 200 mg (therapeutic does is 2 every 4 hours, or 3 every 6 hours)
• Codeine--such as lortab 7.5/300
• Morphine sulfate er 15 mg oral, or morphine sulfate 10 mg/cc: 2.5-10 mg iv or 5 to 20 mg im or sub q.
• Demerol 50 mg po 50mg to 150 mg po q 4 hours, demerol 50 mg/ml iv for severe pain management.

• Ketamine--I have never used it. Normally it is used as an induction agent in humans – but it can be used for brief procedures. I have been given Versed for a number ofback procedures - such as intrathecal and epidural injections, as well as nerve ablation by RF or chemical means. I have had a number of major surgeries – and the anesthesia scares me far more than any procedure… (my last open heart was over 8 hours - and I was in post op ICU for a week...)

Muscle relaxants:
• Robaxan 750 mg
• Flexural 5 mg
• Valium 5 mg
• Xanax
• Atarax 25 mg (also used to potentiate other pain medications, as well as an anti-psychotic)

Heart/cardiac medications:
• Lasix 40 mg (diuretic)
• Nitroglycerine spray pump (the spray will last longer than the tablets – about 3 years.) Pills 6 months at the most. These are the only cardiac/ high BP drugs, I routinely put in kits. There are a number of classes more, which might be considered, but is this a goal of paw treatment?

Stomach/gastrointestinal:
• Acid blocker: Prilosec or Zantac, Imodium 2 mg
• Metamucil (wafers are easier to take, work both for constipation and diarrhea)
• Bentyl (anti spasmodic)
• Tums/Maalox
• Senokot

Antibiotics:
• Your list is fairly good. I would add:
• Doxycycline 100 mg
• Metronidazole 250 mg
• Amoxicillin 250 mg (used more in children)
• Ampicillin, 500mg (a number of simple infections respond)
• Sulfamethoxazole 800mg/trimethoprim/160mg, (commonly used for lower urinary tract infections, most commonly, but at least a dozen other serious conditions, better than the high cost, alternatives, including toxoplasmosis.)

Döterra essential oils:

On Guard (blend)
Lemon
Digestzen (blend)
Melaleuca
Helichrysum
Peppermint
Frankincense
Lavender
Oregano
Deep Blue (blend)
Terrashield (blend)
Breathe (blend)
Aromatouch (blend)
Purify (blend)
Clove
Lemongrass
Fractionated coconut carrier oil


Herbals and alternative medications:

Manuka honey
Local raw honey
Colloidal silver
Vitamin C
Basil
Cinnamon
Cayenne pepper
Clove
Echinacea
Garlic
Sage
Thyme
Astragalus
Cranberry
Elderberry
Ginger
Licorice
Oregano
St John’s Wort


Useful herbals for before, during, & after childbirth:
Shepherds purse (for hemorrhage)
Motherwort
Black and blue cohosh

I am not a doctor, pharmacist, or any other type of medical practitioner. For any thing medical related it is up to the person to do their own due diligence research, and confer with medical professionals before doing any treatment on oneself or others.

Just my opinion.
 

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As always drugs can be helpful or they can be misused or over used.
Tetrahydrozline, or other gets the red out eyedrops, are strictly for a few days use. There are other problems. Personally I just use artificial tears now.
My nurse niece really likes afrin nose spray, her husband just had nose surgery and later had bleeding. She told him to use afrin from her kit, she was away at a conference, but he went to a care center and they gave him afrin. But I have high blood pressure. I know if I take afrin it'll hit me hard, not because I'm so smart, i know because I've self medicated before and it unexpectedly hit me. For my nosebleeds i use a Kleenex tissue plug lubed with something like bag balm. The grease helps contain the bleed and doesn't tear loose the clot when removed. This is not a medically recommended method but it works for me, and I have had bad nosebleeds where I seriously thought of going to the er.
Aloe Vera is a great idea, I have to get some. Once out on a lake i got a bad sunburn, I was walking with my arms out because it hurt to touch anything. Cold water wasn't working but I had some tea bags and it was instant relief.
I think it's a good idea to cut your list as much as possible. Simply because you're unlikely to ever use a full bottle of anything. But I'm not a hard core prepper, if you are you might be more willing to pay for more options. Even i think multiple antibiotics are a good idea.
The Wal-Mart $4 drug list has many of the drugs mentioned if you can get a prescription.
I was just in Canada getting some humalog, 1/10th the price of here, and you can get 50 tabs of a codeine based pain killer, called 222s, to bring across the border. You have to ask the pharmacist but no rx needed. No rx for epipens, I hear they are $100, not something I carry.
 

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People need to realize that while herbals and such do have a place they are generally not as effective as the medications they are trying to replace. You also have to factor in that producing them may not be a viable option due to weather, timing, etc. Not everything we'd like as far as herbals grow in all climes. By all means make plans for them but you are fooling yourself if you believe that a herbal garden will replace a pharmacy. Its easy to call for people to learn to use herbs and such but when push comes to shove it can't be counted on as a replacement, only a supplemental or next-best measure.

I am a medical type. I carry dual licenses and have over 40 years of practice (and Social Security is still a few years away yet!) and I compile medication lists that keep changing with time. As I go through life I learn about more meds than I was familiar with than before, and see more reason for one or another that I might not have thought about previously.

There are of course the nice to have, the pie-in-the-sky stuff like Ketamine and Propofol for surgeries, and something more than a few leftover narcotic tablets. But as we age our needs change. Heart failure may be something that doesn't affect anyone yet but cannot be ruled out for too many of us. Nor can COPD. We won't even begin to address cancer. Let's just stick with some of the common things for now.

Diuretics: Lasix, Diazide, others. Sure you can use asparagus but who is going to eat 4 pounds a day every day for years on end? Though not a route everyone can take a bottle of 100 40 mg tabs of Lasix can be had for literally a small handful of $ down in Mexico. If someone needs it they should be looking into stockpiling it and then rotating it with their local pharmacy-supplied units. If you don't use it you might consider socking away a bottle or three for potential future use for whomever.

We use respiratory meds in this household so stocking up on maintenance meds is a priority for reasons other than just controlling the costs. Lack of access can easily lead to exacerbation of the condition being treated, which in turn can lead to increased disability or even earlier death than otherwise might have occurred (think in terms of months or literally years earlier). So keeping with this genre let's add the following to our list:

Respiratory : Albuterol - Inhalers and inhalation solution; Advair, Spiriva, inhaled corticosteroids and others. These can be further subdivided into maintenance and rescue meds, of which the Albuterol example can fit both categories but Advair is for maintenance only.

As it is getting late and I'll start rambling senselessly if I keep at this I'll end here for now after saying first identify what you know you have to address (chronic of frequent health conditions), want to address (first aid/emergency meds and potential health events that border on likely given time, such as high blood pressure or even anti-radiation protection), and ideally would be capable of addressing given resources and access (Ketamine, Propolfol, etc - the pie-in-the-sky stuff). Then go from there, adjusting your lists accordingly.

Once you have your lists of necessity, desirable and nice-to-have items then determine what you can afford and access and go forward from there.

RR
 

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Thank you, RR. Your name definitely fits your approach.

I look forward to more of your suggestions. All I can do is research, which gives some options, but your experience offers much more than options.

Well done!

Just my opinion.
 

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Grab a copy of the latest book, Jerry (I know you have already, just sayin') and look over the pharm section for a partial list. Doc and I came up with that for a start. It'd have been 4-5 times longer than that but page count and the need to get it published sooner rather than later dictated that we cut it short. But those were the useful ones rather than the pie-in-they-sky I speak of.

BTW, even most docs would have a difficult time acquiring some of the meds we'd like. The people who do overseas relief work probably have the best chance of accessing such things, and even then quantities may be severely limited. I know some who have Fentanyl lollipops in their kits but we are talking a couple-three, not a cabinet full.

RR
 

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People need to realize that while herbals and such do have a place they are generally not as effective as the medications they are trying to replace. You also have to factor in that producing them may not be a viable option due to weather, timing, etc. Not everything we'd like as far as herbals grow in all climes. By all means make plans for them but you are fooling yourself if you believe that a herbal garden will replace a pharmacy. Its easy to call for people to learn to use herbs and such but when push comes to shove it can't be counted on as a replacement, only a supplemental or next-best measure.
100% agree that wild herbs do not totally replace pharmaceuticals but as I mentioned, they are the next best thing when the pills run out, which will likely happen in a prolonged SHTF event.

Each climate has its own basic "brands" of the same basic medicines. It would make sense to become familiar with local plants, especially considering there will not be an unlimited supply of needed pharmaceuticals like we have today. It could be lifesaving to know which plants will treat otherwise uncontrollable fever or diarrhea, and which plants will treat infected wounds, etc. etc.
 

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I'm trying to put together a list of meds (primarily pill form) that would make sense to include in my preps. I've searched through this forum and found various lists, references and discussions, but I couldn't find a single comprehensive list, so I took a stab at creating one. Note that this list assumes no pre-existing medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, severe allergies, etc.) and is targeted at reasonably healthy adults. Yes, I realize that a number of these require a prescription, and yes, I realize that you need to be well-versed in how and when to use each of them, and yes, I do realize that there are natural/herbal alternatives for many of them.



Did anyone at all see the part of the OP highlighted in red above?

I am guilty of scanning the OP too quickly and totally missed that bit.

I am printing your list to use as a guide/checklist/wishlist, and will also use it as a checklist to locate the next-best-thing in local wild medicinals as well.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Just adding my random comments.

Pain - For me, I would add Naproxin and delete Ibuprofen. For me at least, I've found it way more effective as anti inflammatory and cutting pain.
- Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin)
- Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
- Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin)
- Caffeine tablets
Antibiotics
- Amoxicillin
- Ciprofloxacin
- Cephalexin
- Metronidazole
- Doxycycline
- Ampicillin
- Clindamycin
- Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprin
Anti-fungal - I had a nasty underarm rash after Hurricane Ike. (2 weeks humidity and no power/ air conditioning). I tried all that fancy crap and it did nothing but dent my wallet. Cured it with vinegar finally, which was super fast and effective. .
- Fluconazole
Flu - Not sure I would mess with these flu wonder drugs. But Elderberry juice is the wonder drug for me. :)
- Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)
Corticosteroids - A course of prednisone is a real game changer for nasty poison ivy. So I am agreeing whole heartedly.
- Corticosteroids
- Hydrocortisone (Cortef)
- Cortisone
- Deltasone, also called prednisone epocrates
Anti-diarrheal - The only thing that ever worked for me was Donnagel PG (with paregoric, a morphine derivative). Does any of this other crap work?
- loperamide (Imodium)
- bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate, Pepto-Bismol)
Antihistamines For me, Allegra, Benedryl, fluticisone spray (Flo-nase), and oxymetazolin spray are my go -tos. Personally I wouldn't bother with the others.
- Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
- fexofenadine (Allegra)
- levocetirizine (Xyzal)
- loratadine (Claritin, Alavert)
- Brompheniramine (Dimetapp allergy, Nasahist B)
- chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
- clemastine (Tavist)
- diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Decongestants - personally I have no use for Sudafed.
- Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
Cough - If I am coughing, it is because I need to cough. I focus on why I am coughing and address that issue. Cough syrup does almost nothing for me. Fix the sinus infection or whatever is insulting the airway.
- Guaifenesin (Expectorant)
- Dextromethorphan (Suppressant)
Radiation - I don't keep those superhero pills. Iodine is vital for good health though, so I supplement with Lugol's solution. Also,if you continually supplement, your thyroid is full of iodine anyway, and there is no reason to take the superhero pills. Plus many object to supplementing mildly with Lugol's yet think it is a good idea to megadose Iodine in an emergency, when the hospital can't fix you when you go into some thyroid storm or other thryroid emergency from these high dose pills.


- Potassium Iodate (KIO3)

Taking these pills after Fukishima caused several people to go to the hospital.
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/42135438/...-iodide-already-really-bad-idea/#.Wr8l2S7wbIU

https://emergency.cdc.gov/radiation/ki.asp
 

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• Rubbing alcohol
• Hydrogen peroxide
• Petroleum jelly
• Skin lotion
• Vinegar
• Baking soda
• Epsom salt
• Aloe-vera juice

Eye/Ear/Dental
• Eye ointment: yellow oxide of mercury 1% ophthalmic
• Eye anti-irritant: Tetrahydrozline drops (sterile solution of tetrahydrozoline hc1 .05%, sodium borate, boric acid, sodium chloride, benzalkonium chloride .01%, ethylene diamine tetraacetate .1%)
• Ear drops: Schein Otic drops (formulation of chloroxlenol, henzalkonlum chloride, acetic acid & glycerine)
• Tooth pain: Clove oil (Does burn slightly on application. Children might not use it very well or willingly)
• Dental: Eugenol or oil of cloves
• Dental: Powdered zinc oxide
• Toothache ointment: favorite brand, several
• Lip balm: favorite brand, several

• Antibiotic ointment: Triple Antibiotic Ointment (per gram: bacitracin-400 units, neomycin sulfate-5mg, polymyxin b sulfate-5000 units)


Pain/Inflammation- any.

Stomach/Intestine/Bowel
• Antacid: Dimacid tablets
• Anti-indigestion /nausea/diarrhea: Pepto-Bismol tablets(bismuth
• Anti-diarrhea: Imodium
• Metamucil: (adsorbs liquid)


Some doctor recommendations:
Skin treatments:
• Anti fungal: clotrimazole, miconazole (vaginal cream and ointment)

• Antibiotic: triple antibiotic (Polysporin)


Also- Worm Treatments?


Just my opinion.
great list Jerry. I quoted just a few of them wondered if any idea of shelf lives? Probably a lot of work to add this. ..
 

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POLICE DETECTIVE (ret)
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Did anyone at all see the part of the OP highlighted in red above? This is a list of medications to have on hand, IN CONJUNCTION WITH non-commercial DIY options such as herbals, which is a separate subject best addressed by someone that knows what they are doing.

Below are my thoughts on the subject, plus some suggestions made by an MD sympathetic to my request for guidance. His list should take precedence over mine if there are any conflicts.

Do you own due diligence research.

(I have included my thoughts on alternatives, just to prime the pump, so to speak. But the main thrust of the thread is not DIY, it is stocking medications and treatments available now.


My thoughts on stocking medications and treatments for the PAW

Items to keep in bulk (small containers, however)
• Rubbing alcohol
• Hydrogen peroxide
• Petroleum jelly
• Skin lotion
• Vinegar
• Baking soda
• Table salt
• Epsom salt
• Aloe-vera juice

Sun/Heat/Exposure
• Salt tablets: (Use with caution, and only with copious amounts of water)(It is much better to use formulated rehydration tablets, powders, or drinks.)
• Rehydration tablets/powder
• Sports type vitamin/mineral/electrolyte drink

Eye/Ear/Dental
• Eye ointment: yellow oxide of mercury 1% ophthalmic
• Eye anti-irritant: Tetrahydrozline drops (sterile solution of tetrahydrozoline hc1 .05%, sodium borate, boric acid, sodium chloride, benzalkonium chloride .01%, ethylene diamine tetraacetate .1%)
• Ear drops: Schein Otic drops (formulation of chloroxlenol, henzalkonlum chloride, acetic acid & glycerine)
• Tooth pain: Clove oil (Does burn slightly on application. Children might not use it very well or willingly)
• Dental: Eugenol or oil of cloves
• Dental: Powdered zinc oxide
• Toothache ointment: favorite brand, several
• Lip balm: favorite brand, several

Colds/Flu Symptoms
• Throat lozenges/cough drops: favorite brand/selection
• Cough medication (liquid): favorite brand/selection
• Cold remedy (liquid/tablet): favorite brand/selection
• Decongestant: Vicks vapor rub
• Vitamin C

Topical/Skin/Burns
• Anti-fungal: Tinactin cream (1% tolnaftate cream)
• Anti-inflammation/anti-itch: Hydrocortisone 1/2% cream
• Anti-burn/anti-itch/topical anesthetic: Dibucaine 1% ointment
• Antibiotic ointment: Triple Antibiotic Ointment (per gram: bacitracin-400 units, neomycin sulfate-5mg, polymyxin b sulfate-5000 units)
• Skin healant ointment: Vitamin A & D ointment (lanolin-petrolatum base) (1st degree burns, diaper rash, dry skin)
• Sun screen: zinc oxide ointment
• Burn irrigation solution: Mild saline solution
• Burn liquid loss replacement drink: sodium chloride/bicarbanate powder (mix w/water & drink after burns to help replace surface liquid loss)

Pain/Inflammation
• Pain/anti-inflammation: aspirin, Aspirin 325mg and 81mg
• Tylenol (be aware of liver problems
• Motrin 200 mg (therapeutic does is 2 every 4 hours, or 3 every 6 hours)
• Pain/muscle relaxant/tranquilizer: Percogesic tablets (325mg acetaminophen w/30mg phenyltoloxamine citrate)

Muscle Aches/Pains
• Heat balm: favorite brand, several

Breathing
• Antihistamine: chlorpheniramine maleate 4mg tablets
• Decongestant/vasoconstrictor: pseudoephedrine hydrochloride 30mg tablets
• Decongestant: Afrin nasal spray (oxymetazoline hydrochloride 0.05%)

Stomach/Intestine/Bowel
• Antacid: Dimacid tablets
• Anti-indigestion /nausea/diarrhea: Pepto-Bismol tablets(bismuth subsalicylate) (no sugar)
• Laxative: Bisacodyl 5mg tablets (Dulcolax, Thera-lax, Bon-o-Lax) (does not enter milk of nursing mothers)
• Anti-diarrhea: Imodium
• Metamucil: (adsorbs liquid)
• Anti-nausea/motion: meclizine hydrochloride 25mg tablets
• Vomit inducer (after poisoning): syrup of ipecac (check with your doctor as this has fallen out of favor) (not for use if strychnine, corrosives (alkalis [lye]) or strong acids), petroleum distillates such as kerosene, gasoline, coal oil, fuel oil, paint thinner or cleaning fluid have been ingested)

Female Specific
• PMS control medication: (several brands)
• Acidophilus pills (for women before taking antibiotics that could cause yeast infections)
• Miconazole (for yeast infections)
• Laxative: Bisacodyl 5mg tablets (Dulcolax, Thera-lax, Bon-o-Lax) (does not enter milk of nursing mothers)

Prescription Medications & Treatments
• Normal supply of current use prescriptions
• Normal supply of constant use non-prescription items (blood/urine test strips, etc.)

• 3-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items
• 14-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items
• 30-day reserve supply of current use prescriptions & constant use non-prescription items

• Post disaster emergency-use-only prescriptions (returned to doctor in sealed container periodically for inspection to verify non-abuse) (upon expiration date returned to doctor for disposal and issuance of new prescription)

• syringes (in areas where prescriptions are required)
• prescription dental extraction pain reliever (injectable)
• prescription local anesthetic (injectable)
• prescription multi-use narcotic (codeine)(oral/injectable)
• prescription severe pain reliever (oral/injectable)
• prescription muscle relaxant (oral/injectable)
• prescription tranquilizer (oral/injectable)
• prescription broad spectrum antibiotic (oral/injectable)
• IV solutions & equipment (D5W, saline, Ringer's lactate solution, glucose, blood expander, blood plasma)
• 50 cc 50% dextrose for hypoglycemia
• Other items as personal physician recommends and suggests for post disaster use

Specific RX possibilities
• Cipro 500 mg. Anti bacterial infection (x90)
• Morphine - pain
• Epinephrine - allergic reactions
• Lidocaine, injectable – dental/suturing pain
• Lidocaine, topical – skin surface pain/suturing pain
• Diazepam - sedative/muscle relaxant
• Ketamine - anasthetic
• Dexamethasone sod phos inj 4mg/ml - steroid anti-inflammatory
• Naproxin sulfate – anti-inflammatory
• Phenoxymethyl penicillin pen vk 500mg - antibiotic
• Clindamycin 300mg - anti biotic
• Codeine - many uses

Some doctor recommendations:
Skin treatments:
• Anti fungal: clotrimazole, miconazole (vaginal cream and ointment)
• Anti-inflammatory: cortisone 1%, calamine lotion
• Sun screen: UVA/UVB, SPF 30, & with avobenzone, or one of the occlusive, such as zinc oxide
• Antibiotic: triple antibiotic (Polysporin)
• Lip protection: choose high SPF, and moisturizer.

Burn treatments:
• Thermal burns: sterile saline for rinse, in pressurized cans, or the IV bottle. Cool sterile water can also be used.
• Dressings: I have used Silvadene, even though there is some controversy, hydrogel burn pads are effective, and today I would choose them.

Eye treatments:
• Neosporin ophthalmic
• Cipro ophthalmic
• Poly pred.

Ear treatments:
• Domeboro otic
• Neomycin and polymyxin b sulfates
• Hydrocortisone otic

Allergy treatments:
• Antihistamine: Benadryl oral (OTC) parental:50 mg diphenhydramine hydrochloride/milliliter
• steroids: Medrol dose pac (5 day decreasing dose of steroid), solu-cortef, (500 mg/2 ml) or solumedrol (500 mg/4 ml) for iv or im use in severe allergic reaction. These have to be made up in the vial-- dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, usp 4 mg/ml and 10 mg/ml, also has to be made up. (steroids can also be used as anti-inflammatories, either orally, by injection im, or by injection into a joint.)
• Epinephrine: epi-pen, or epinephrine 0.3 to 0.5 cc. Of 1:1,000 solution im. These are in ampules, and i have seen last 10 years.

Pain medications:
• Aspirin 325mg and 81mg strengths (pain and anti-inflammatory
• Tylenol
• Motrin 200 mg (therapeutic does is 2 every 4 hours, or 3 every 6 hours)
• Codeine--such as lortab 7.5/300
• Morphine sulfate er 15 mg oral, or morphine sulfate 10 mg/cc: 2.5-10 mg iv or 5 to 20 mg im or sub q.
• Demerol 50 mg po 50mg to 150 mg po q 4 hours, demerol 50 mg/ml iv for severe pain management.

• Ketamine--I have never used it. Normally it is used as an induction agent in humans – but it can be used for brief procedures. I have been given Versed for a number ofback procedures - such as intrathecal and epidural injections, as well as nerve ablation by RF or chemical means. I have had a number of major surgeries – and the anesthesia scares me far more than any procedure… (my last open heart was over 8 hours - and I was in post op ICU for a week...)

Muscle relaxants:
• Robaxan 750 mg
• Flexural 5 mg
• Valium 5 mg
• Xanax
• Atarax 25 mg (also used to potentiate other pain medications, as well as an anti-psychotic)

Heart/cardiac medications:
• Lasix 40 mg (diuretic)
• Nitroglycerine spray pump (the spray will last longer than the tablets – about 3 years.) Pills 6 months at the most. These are the only cardiac/ high BP drugs, I routinely put in kits. There are a number of classes more, which might be considered, but is this a goal of paw treatment?

Stomach/gastrointestinal:
• Acid blocker: Prilosec or Zantac, Imodium 2 mg
• Metamucil (wafers are easier to take, work both for constipation and diarrhea)
• Bentyl (anti spasmodic)
• Tums/Maalox
• Senokot

Antibiotics:
• Your list is fairly good. I would add:
• Doxycycline 100 mg
• Metronidazole 250 mg
• Amoxicillin 250 mg (used more in children)
• Ampicillin, 500mg (a number of simple infections respond)
• Sulfamethoxazole 800mg/trimethoprim/160mg, (commonly used for lower urinary tract infections, most commonly, but at least a dozen other serious conditions, better than the high cost, alternatives, including toxoplasmosis.)

Döterra essential oils:

On Guard (blend)
Lemon
Digestzen (blend)
Melaleuca
Helichrysum
Peppermint
Frankincense
Lavender
Oregano
Deep Blue (blend)
Terrashield (blend)
Breathe (blend)
Aromatouch (blend)
Purify (blend)
Clove
Lemongrass
Fractionated coconut carrier oil


Herbals and alternative medications:

Manuka honey
Local raw honey
Colloidal silver
Vitamin C
Basil
Cinnamon
Cayenne pepper
Clove
Echinacea
Garlic
Sage
Thyme
Astragalus
Cranberry
Elderberry
Ginger
Licorice
Oregano
St John’s Wort


Useful herbals for before, during, & after childbirth:
Shepherds purse (for hemorrhage)
Motherwort
Black and blue cohosh

I am not a doctor, pharmacist, or any other type of medical practitioner. For any thing medical related it is up to the person to do their own due diligence research, and confer with medical professionals before doing any treatment on oneself or others.

Just my opinion.

HOLY COW, WHAT A LIST! :eek::eek::eek:
 

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great list Jerry. I quoted just a few of them wondered if any idea of shelf lives? Probably a lot of work to add this. ..
Thanks sixtus.

I do know the shelf life of a few items. But I do not want the responsibility of someone depending only my lists blindly. So I do not include some types of information, as I really do want people to do the due diligence research on products I list so they will be fully informed and will make decisions based on what they have researched themselves, and therefore know what is right for them.

My lists, as always, are options lists, lists of possibilities, things to check, things to make people think, and to provide information or ideas that others might not think of due to simply not ever being exposed to some of the things I have.

Only when I add words to the effect "I would recommend" am I making a recommendation. If those words are not included, it is simply an item that a person might want to research. And if you notice, I very seldom use 'I would recommend". It is not like 'Just my opinion", which is my standard close. Because that is pretty much what all of my posts are. My opinions. And I feel like everyone should form their own opinion, based on their research. Sure, look at my stuff and consider it, but do not depend on it alone.

This is not a rant at you, sixtus. You just gave me a good opportunity to express my thoughts on they whys and wherefores of how I present information.


Oh. And the worm treatment: Spicy foods? (See? This is why one must do their own due diligence research.)
And of course, Just my opinion.
 

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My lists, as always, are options lists, lists of possibilities, things to check, things to make people think, and to provide information or ideas that others might not think of due to simply not ever being exposed to some of the things I have.
This 100%. Thank you, Jerry.
 
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