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[96] wks to off-grid esc
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Drive your routes. Maps are helpful, but the best way is to physically look at it, walk it over. Many areas, if blocked, would require a hike of several hours to get around the blockage.
Yes, basically this. Start with interstate highways, the obvious primary lines of drift, and just ink them in red. There was a great thread here recently where someone posted a study of lines of drift after Katrina. Interstates to the next big city, and everywhere in between caught something like 80% or more of drift. What Katrina showed us (in my assessment of that article) is that a destination is as important as a route when it comes to emigration. When New Orleans disappeared, people's minds turned to Atlanta and Houston. Many places (off the interstates) were completely bypassed. If I where to apply the same principals here in NM, I'd expect massive movement from Albuquerque to Phoenix, El Paso, Denver (of course there's an interstate highway towards each). It would be pretty easy to side step that mass here in the vastness of NM, especially since that mass is just a small fraction of people living back east.

Helping the assessment here in NM are pretty distinct chokepoints east-to-west through the Rocky Mountains . "The Santa Fe Trail" being an example, now Interstate25 at the Glorieta pass. Movement through most of the mountains in between the four main passes is worse than unrealistic for the VAST majority of people. It seems all bets are off back east, as it just looks like a huge grid of roads and towns to me, not sure there's enough topography to create choke points, but like you said, rivers and bridges probably the better focus in many regions.

One thing I'd look at hard is the railroads, which are kinda overlooked by most people. They are where they are for a good reason, and they don't always coordinate with major highways. As an example, there are at least twice as many railroad bridges across the Rio Grande as vehicle bridges, and I'd guess 99 of 100 people have no clue about that. Railroads could work for you (as a descreet way to "avoid the crowds") or against you though in the long run. I'm of the mind that the railroad will again become a much more significant component of everyday life in many SHTF scenarios, it may again become the only means of trade and travel across the continent in certain realistic scenarios (I think that Warren Buffet is a prepper, and certainly had a keen eye to the future when he bought up all the railroads and expanded it to two lanes from coast to coast). My point here is that I expect travel and drift to change from interstates to railroads over time in a prolonged SHTF.

Lots of folks living along the coast talk about taking to the sea on a boat. I've always dismissed it as a fairy tale idea, but can see the wisdom in considering using waterways as a means to GTFO of an area ahead of the herds. The Mississippi River was a primary travel route for over a century, a keen prepper could exploit waterways if he's prepped for it in advance.

Having said all that, I can get to my BOL from anywhere in NM without spending a single mile on pavement. I can get there from within 100 miles without spending a single mile on an actual public road.
 

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Homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, basically this. Start with interstate highways, the obvious primary lines of drift, and just ink them in red. There was a great thread here recently where someone posted a study of lines of drift after Katrina. Interstates to the next big city, and everywhere in between caught something like 80% or more of drift. What Katrina showed us (in my assessment of that article) is that a destination is as important as a route when it comes to emigration. When New Orleans disappeared, people's minds turned to Atlanta and Houston. Many places (off the interstates) were completely bypassed. If I where to apply the same principals here in NM, I'd expect massive movement from Albuquerque to Phoenix, El Paso, Denver (of course there's an interstate highway towards each). It would be pretty easy to side step that mass here in the vastness of NM, especially since that mass is just a small fraction of people living back east.

Helping the assessment here in NM are pretty distinct chokepoints east-to-west through the Rocky Mountains . "The Santa Fe Trail" being an example, now Interstate25 at the Glorieta pass. Movement through most of the mountains in between the four main passes is worse than unrealistic for the VAST majority of people. It seems all bets are off back east, as it just looks like a huge grid of roads and towns to me, not sure there's enough topography to create choke points, but like you said, rivers and bridges probably the better focus in many regions.

One thing I'd look at hard is the railroads, which are kinda overlooked by most people. They are where they are for a good reason, and they don't always coordinate with major highways. As an example, there are at least twice as many railroad bridges across the Rio Grande as vehicle bridges, and I'd guess 99 of 100 people have no clue about that. Railroads could work for you (as a descreet way to "avoid the crowds") or against you though in the long run. I'm of the mind that the railroad will again become a much more significant component of everyday life in many SHTF scenarios, it may again become the only means of trade and travel across the continent in certain realistic scenarios (I think that Warren Buffet is a prepper, and certainly had a keen eye to the future when he bought up all the railroads and expanded it to two lanes from coast to coast). My point here is that I expect travel and drift to change from interstates to railroads over time in a prolonged SHTF.

Lots of folks living along the coast talk about taking to the sea on a boat. I've always dismissed it as a fairy tale idea, but can see the wisdom in considering using waterways as a means to GTFO of an area ahead of the herds. The Mississippi River was a primary travel route for over a century, a keen prepper could exploit waterways if he's prepped for it in advance.

Having said all that, I can get to my BOL from anywhere in NM without spending a single mile on pavement. I can get there from within 100 miles without spending a single mile on an actual public road.
Some folks maybe don't know but many railroad bridges were at one time in certain places built to allow vehicular traffic. Also depending on the type of disaster, for example Dams failing on the Missouri or Mississippi anyone east of the Mississippi could very well be SOL. Many interstate roads also have methods of closing off access, gates etc. Good advice and insight thank you
 

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I do believe KSS expounded on my thoughts well. While we drive out to our property, I am constantly pointing out the natural choke points, falls/fouling zones, hiding/OP points and escape routes to my kids. We also go over the maps and compare to what we actually saw. My oldest was the first of them to point out that the newer maps did not show as many water sources (springs, stock tanks, seasonal flows etc). I looked at him and said; "They sure don't do they? Why do think I snatch up older maps when I find them, even if I already have a half dozen?" I then pointed out the missing roads and paths and compared them to the newer marked ones. He traced a few with his finger and smiled; "Cool."

Drive it, walk it, crawl it. Compare it to your maps. Compare it to older maps. It is incredible how much information has changed over the years, but the basic lay has remained the same. Most will not know that.
 
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