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Lets talk about urban survival / disaster preparedness plans.

Insurance - For my mom and dad in September of 2008, it was flood insurance. Their house was only about 6 feet above sea level. When Hurricane Ike pushed the storm surge into Bridge City, Texas their house got 9 feet of water in it. The flood insurance made sure they had money to rebuild with.

This picture was taken after the water had already gone down about 6 feet. Mom and dads house is to the right, just outside the view of the camera.



I live several miles from the nearest river, and 100 feet above sea level, so flood insurance is not a high on the list.

Water - My mom and dad have a well with a hand pump in their yard, I dont. So water is an important factor for me. One of my investments has been into a couple of Berkey water systems.

Here is a picture of the well at mom and dads house.



Mom and dad probably need a Berkey Water Filter like what I have, so that they can filter the water from their well - just to be on the safe side.

My brother has a private well, but no backup hand pump. If the power goes out, he is just out of luck. The good thing, he only lives about 1/2 mile from mom and dad. So he could walk to their house if he had to.


Food - Mom and dad live about 300 feet away from a marsh where there is some good fishing.

My brother has some land that he could farm, but its mostly salt marsh type of land. So I dont know how good stuff would grow there. But he is a good duck hunter and an excellent shot with rifle and shotgun. If nothing else, there are the alligators, fish, crabs and turtles in the marshes. One day he walked out to his car to go to work, and there was a 6 foot alligator under his car. My brother was going to shoot the gator, but his neighbor - who is about 60 years old - jumped on the gator, wrestled it around, and drug it off into the marsh. That is the story as it was told to me.

My nearest backup food source is a river about 5 miles from my house. The camp where I could go hunting is about 15 - 20 miles from my house.

Heat during the winter time - Mom and dad have a fireplace, while I have a kerosene space heater - this is a backup to the central air and heat.

My brother had a wood burning stove, but took it out after the Hurricane Ike flood.
 

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like most people who lived on the coast of Texas we all had our share of the bad weather down there ..i had at one time i think like 4 or 5 diff insurances on the house and the land ..

we had a well but the water could a little salty at times for it was a close surface well it was only about 20 ft down ..we where about 10 miles from coast and the gulf of mexico and 10 miles away from Corpus Christi Tx area ..so we saw our fair share of bad weather ..we allways had food and water stored in the house along with extras items my mom and dad thought we might need at times after a bad storm ..
 

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Lets talk about urban survival / disaster preparedness plans.

Insurance - For my mom and dad in September of 2008, it was flood insurance. Their house was only about 6 feet above sea level. When Hurricane Ike pushed the storm surge into Bridge City, Texas their house got 9 feet of water in it. The flood insurance made sure they had money to rebuild with.

This picture was taken after the water had already gone down about 6 feet. Mom and dads house is to the right, just outside the view of the camera.



I live several miles from the nearest river, and 100 feet above sea level, so flood insurance is not a high on the list.

Water - My mom and dad have a well with a hand pump in their yard, I dont. So water is an important factor for me. One of my investments has been into a couple of Berkey water systems.

Here is a picture of the well at mom and dads house.



Mom and dad probably need a Berkey Water Filter like what I have, so that they can filter the water from their well - just to be on the safe side.

My brother has a private well, but no backup hand pump. If the power goes out, he is just out of luck. The good thing, he only lives about 1/2 mile from mom and dad. So he could walk to their house if he had to.


Food - Mom and dad live about 300 feet away from a marsh where there is some good fishing.

My brother has some land that he could farm, but its mostly salt marsh type of land. So I dont know how good stuff would grow there. But he is a good duck hunter and an excellent shot with rifle and shotgun. If nothing else, there are the alligators, fish, crabs and turtles in the marshes. One day he walked out to his car to go to work, and there was a 6 foot alligator under his car. My brother was going to shoot the gator, but his neighbor - who is about 60 years old - jumped on the gator, wrestled it around, and drug it off into the marsh. That is the story as it was told to me.

My nearest backup food source is a river about 5 miles from my house. The camp where I could go hunting is about 15 - 20 miles from my house.

Heat during the winter time - Mom and dad have a fireplace, while I have a kerosene space heater - this is a backup to the central air and heat.

My brother had a wood burning stove, but took it out after the Hurricane Ike flood.
I'm originally from the Beaumont/Pt. Arthur/Orange area Kev and I know exactly what you are talking about brother.

I'm in Denton County now and the country is very close to the north as far as bugging out options are concerned. The lake I live very close to has some excellent areas to hunker down should leaving the house become necessary. The fishing on the lake is pretty good and plenty of small game to be had.
 

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I live out West, in the Pacific Northwest. Tacoma WA to be exact. We are surrounded by mountains and evergreen forests far higher than we are in elevation. Back in the 1800's the city fathers had no idea how much water the city might need in the future. They must have been big dreamers though because they secured such a large water shed and river system for the city that we supply 100% of our own needs as well as all our suburbs and a big chunk of Seattle's needs. Tacoma is fed by gravity to 95% of its area.

We also have many valleys with rivers that we have built Hydro-Electric projects on, and we produce 80% of our own power. All projects were built before 1965, and though they have been modernized, the original manual switch gear is still in place.

I still have a Berky and a Katadyn in case services falter a bit, but I am confident water for the garden and washing will be at the tap when needed. Though power may not be available 24/7, I'm sure there will be enough to have lights ai least 1/2 the day. Enough to recharge our rechargables to be sure. Water and some power, plus all my stuff with a familiar roof over my head, are the main reasons I will probably bug in if TSHTF.
 

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unless the well has very tight connections on all it's plumbing and equipment i would think a flood would make the water contaminated. as i also live in the PNW flooding is not a problem unless you live in the lowlands which more and more are doing to their great distress on a regular basis.
 

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I live at 7000 feet above sea level- no flood insurance needed. No lakes or rivers to fish in but alot of wildlife around if needed. Wood stove, pellet stove, kerosene heater and propane all as back up to natural gas forced air, I don't like to be cold. My well is over 600 feet deep so its power or windmill. 6500 watt genny and fuel for that. We do store 550 gallons of water on site with filters just in case. I need to get going with solar but so far I think 250 watt is minimum and its not affordable at this time.
 

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keep in mind wild edible supplements even in a marsh. Up north we had a handy succulent grass called salt wort. I'm not sure if its down here, but it was full of salty juice that was quite tasty on a salad. We als had lots of cat tails, and some parts of them are starchy and good.

My points is, the sooner you can replace or stretch out your stocked food- the more you have later on if a crop fails or something, so keep in mind of all you might use around you- even the marsh has some goodies.
 
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In East Texas my nearest food source is my fenced in back yard. (Before you do this, consult an expert or have a working knowledge of what you are doing) Serious, there are enough weeds/flowers/nuts/berries/etc. in the back to keep my family going for quite some time and I do not have that much of a yard. I could make lunch for my family without having to step off the back porch. Keep in mind some weeds have a high acid content so you dont want to eat to much of them for an extended period of time but they are easy to balance.
 

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I live in a suburb of Houston.

Insurance: We weathered Ike and other flood related incidents without water making it near the house. It has come up into the yard a couple of times, but mostly because the drains got clogged. We're above the 500 yr flood plain, so I don't feel the need for flood insurance.

Water: I'm on city water, so I expect it to go out. I'm building a storage of 5 gal water bottles, but realize this is finite. I need to get some form of water purification. There is a stream less than a mile from my house and a lake within 3.

But I know getting the water from these sources to my house is an issue. I plan on buying buckets and a heavy garden cart to haul it. (like the image attached) We have paved hiking trails that lead all the way to the stream or lake.

Food: I'm building a storage now. If I had to live off the land, there are lots of squirrels. There are also deer in my neighborhood or near by, though I expect them to get hunted out quickly. The lake provides fishing as well. I'll be planting a square foot garden as soon as it warms up.

Heat in the Winter: My home is old enough to actually have a real fireplace and we have fire wood. Luckily we don't have many cold days in Houston.
 

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Insurance- at 1,800" above sea level flood insurance is the last thing we need

Water- currently we have a well and we are working on putting up a wind turbine this spring or summer just to pump water and keep the fridge going. We also have a pond and a spring fed creek on our property.

Food- besides our preps we have a seed bank for at least 2-3 years. We live in between two of the Finger Lakes and a third is only 7 miles from here so fishing should be pretty good, we also have plenty of wild life. We also have started planting fruit trees and currently have over 50 hickory trees, sugar maples and an ungodly amount of blackberry and raspberry bushes. In worse case we always have the wild edibles to forage from.
Heat- We have a wood burning stove and firewood for 2 years, we are surrounded by miles and miles of woods.
Even with our advantages I still do not feel fully prepared and hope this year to add more fruit trees and chickens to our growing preps. We'd also like to dig a second pond that would be spring fed and fill it with fish but we'll have to see if that's within the budget this year ahhh if only I had a million $'s LOL.
 

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Insurance- at 3900 or so feet above sea level, last spring i watched several homes down hill from me flood last spring when water from the creek the were built next to over ran it's banks. it's not about how many feet you are above sea level, it's about weather or not you live in flood plane. now i am about 75 feet higher up in elevation and about 1/2 mile or so from there, so i don't need the insurance. but they sure did, and only a few had it.

also might want to check your home owners insurance to see if your covered in the event you have a water line bust or a sewage line break and backwash into your home. i used to work for a fire and flood restoration service in lewiston, idaho, and some of the jobs they had were being paid for out of the homeowners pocket for lack of coverage.

if you have a flood, and it it mixes up all the nasties (chemicals, garbage, dead animals, waste water treatment) in the area, you may want to skip fishing for awhile, or at least fish upstream from sorces of pollution.

just my $0.02
 
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