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Discussion Starter #1
Ello folks,

So, I've spent many a long hour perusing these forums and I have learned a lot... on paper.

I have to say that although many of the things I've seen are globally relevant, the boards are definately States-centric. I was wondering therefore if anyone knew of any UK based resources for similar topics? I had been thinking about pushing my boundaries out into the woods as I said in my greeting post, so thought about maybe heading off to one of those bushcraft courses for some basic skills, then working everything else out for myself... what do you folks think?

Just trying to expand my knowledge base a little in ways that don't have to include "hmm, what gun will I take with me today, the Walther or the Uzi?"
 

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V
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Ello folks,

So, I've spent many a long hour perusing these forums and I have learned a lot... on paper.

I have to say that although many of the things I've seen are globally relevant, the boards are definately States-centric. I was wondering therefore if anyone knew of any UK based resources for similar topics? I had been thinking about pushing my boundaries out into the woods as I said in my greeting post, so thought about maybe heading off to one of those bushcraft courses for some basic skills, then working everything else out for myself... what do you folks think?

Just trying to expand my knowledge base a little in ways that don't have to include "hmm, what gun will I take with me today, the Walther or the Uzi?"


Learning them on paper is fine and dandy, now git to dem woods. I know the theory of friction fire lighting (hand/ bow and plough) however I suck big ones in practice but I'm getting better :rolleyes:

I just got back from a nice hour or so with the kids making our Yule wreath for the front door :D:

I think a course as you suggest is well worth it for learning the basics, even for learning more than the basics if you have the money to spare. I dont so I learn as I go, if I read something and I've never seen or heard it before I'll pop down for an afternoon or day in the woods and give it ago.

Some things can even be practiced in the safety of your back garden, friction fire starting for instance, proper safe knife handling (in fact I recommend starting this at home as your easier for emergancy services to find if you mess up)


http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/ will help with the woodland/wilderness side of things just dont mention survivalism :thumb:
http://www.ludlowsurvivors.com/ is a good uk site I lost membership due to inactivity but its a good site with some level headed people on all the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Some things can even be practiced in the safety of your back garden, friction fire starting for instance, proper safe knife handling (in fact I recommend starting this at home as your easier for emergancy services to find if you mess up)
Point well taken! I don't think I'm in iminent danger of cutting off an arm with my SAK, and knife handling is a frequent part of my job, but a little combustion might not go a miss. Might get a slingshot and target and practice, then go "git me sum critters" - see if I can master the noble art of hunter-gathering!
 

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Point well taken! I don't think I'm in iminent danger of cutting off an arm with my SAK, and knife handling is a frequent part of my job, but a little combustion might not go a miss. Might get a slingshot and target and practice, then go "git me sum critters" - see if I can master the noble art of hunter-gathering!
Arm? Nah :rolleyes:
Slip while carving and open up an artery? well its been known :eek: lol.

Like I said mate you can practice on your own without the need for a course, although a course would be valuable.

If you do go on a course take pictures come back and give us a review and breakdown of how it went what you learned.

If you decide to go it alone and learn from your mistakes, could still make some interesting posts :thumb:;)
 

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Earthwalker.
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Id go visit a bushcraft forum as you will learn a hell of a lot more there than you ever will here.:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Id go visit a bushcraft forum as you will learn a hell of a lot more there than you ever will here.:thumb:
*leaves*

:D:

Seriously though, thanks for the feedback. Recently gave up smoking and I'm looking for a worthy cause to put the "look how much I'm saving" pot to - it's either a BC course or a Direct Access bike training/test.

Given how awful my sense of balance is, a week in a forest with some cutlery and a blanket is probably safer!
 

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Gott Mit Uns
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Arm? Nah :rolleyes:
Slip while carving and open up an artery? well its been known :eek: lol.

Like I said mate you can practice on your own without the need for a course, although a course would be valuable.

If you do go on a course take pictures come back and give us a review and breakdown of how it went what you learned.

If you decide to go it alone and learn from your mistakes, could still make some interesting posts :thumb:;)
Just food for thought, accidents will take on a whole new meaning post SHTF, a small cut with a knife will be a major issue with reduced sanitatin and no antibiotcs and health care. Pre-1940's simple little accidents killed with alarming regularity:rolleyes: PS nice to see ya aroung sticks hve not talked to ya in a while.
 

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Earthwalker.
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*leaves*

:D:

Seriously though, thanks for the feedback. Recently gave up smoking and I'm looking for a worthy cause to put the "look how much I'm saving" pot to - it's either a BC course or a Direct Access bike training/test.

Given how awful my sense of balance is, a week in a forest with some cutlery and a blanket is probably safer!
When i packed in smoking i started carving wood which is a great pass time and gives your hands something to do.
 

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Balance? Hiking sticks are useful, and may be used to pitch a small tarp.

I say start with your own backyard. Do you have one?

If not, go on a country walk. I understand UK allows it.

Lean to "stealth" camp. Property owners may live in the city. It isn't often easy to find a property owner. So walk, and camp overnight using a bivy and a small tarp and leave no trace.

When you camp out overnight, have a "maximum-minimum thermometer" to work out if you are a warm-sleeper or a cold-sleeper. Do this with a reputable rented sleeping bag, or a sleeping bag with a return policy if perfectly clean. Wear your first layer inside the sleeping bag. On the outside, have a bivy bag.

Have a tarp. Practice setting up a tarp, before the real use, until you can set it up properly in under 5 minutes so you can get out of rain in a reasonable amount of time.

Next, look at the expected high and low temperatures where you are and where you think you might be able to BOL. Weather services have this information. Record highs and record lows are also useful.

For example, at Point Reyes National Seashore, we have had 5 "one hundred year storms" in the last 30 years. That is because "one hundred year storm" is not a proper name. (note: Scientists are not pure, noble or superior thinkers and excellent people.)

Look at maps for where flood plains are. Do not locate there. Rain will wash out the BOL.

It is not likely, you could camp in a national park of course.

It is more likely, you could camp in a thicket. Really.

I suggest you abandon ideas of neolithic-era survival, unless you will eat rodents and bugs.

Meat or Fish only is not an adequate diet: you need fat. Break bones for the marrow. You need green vegetation. You need root vegetables.

Like that.

It is better to purchase food, put it in a cache or several cache.

It is better to start a garden, so you know how to have a productive garden.

If you are English and do not garden, hey, what's wrong with you?

Surreptitiously, plant root vegetables near the BOL you plan for.

I would not waste money on "bushcraft" lessons. Find a boyscout or scoutmaster. Ask for a demonstration of starting a fire with a stick and a bow you make. Then, be smart enough to carry a suitable bit of string in your EDC.

Didn't scouting start in UK? Lord Baden Powell was the founder, right?

Purchase sturdy shoes, sturdy socks, sturdy clothing. Hat, gloves.

Find out what clothing works best in the kind of weather you anticipate.

That's a start.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Balance? Hiking sticks are useful, and may be used to pitch a small tarp.
Balance... I was referring to the sanity of learning to ride a motorcycle when I don't have it. Thanks for the stick idea tho...:rolleyes:

I say start with your own backyard. Do you have one?
Yes, love. I have quite a large one.:D:

If not, go on a country walk. I understand UK allows it.
Yes, hiking is still a permitted activity, as long as we meet our societal upkeep quotient between jaunts.

Lean to "stealth" camp. Property owners may live in the city. It isn't often easy to find a property owner. So walk, and camp overnight using a bivy and a small tarp and leave no trace.
No worries here - I'll hop over my garden fence into the woods, or walk out of the hamlet to the top of the valley, for proper forestiness.

When you camp out overnight, have a "maximum-minimum thermometer" to work out if you are a warm-sleeper or a cold-sleeper. Do this with a reputable rented sleeping bag, or a sleeping bag with a return policy if perfectly clean. Wear your first layer inside the sleeping bag. On the outside, have a bivy bag.
After a fair few camping trips (of the family kind, rather than the tarp and camo kind) I'm reasonably certain I could sleep in a shallow pool of fox urine without too much discomfort, hot or cold. And I won't awake til I'm good and ready to, either... I sleep like a corpse!

Have a tarp. Practice setting up a tarp, before the real use, until you can set it up properly in under 5 minutes so you can get out of rain in a reasonable amount of time.
Good plan, thanks - I'll add it to my list!

Next, look at the expected high and low temperatures where you are and where you think you might be able to BOL. Weather services have this information. Record highs and record lows are also useful.

For example, at Point Reyes National Seashore, we have had 5 "one hundred year storms" in the last 30 years. That is because "one hundred year storm" is not a proper name. (note: Scientists are not pure, noble or superior thinkers and excellent people.)

Look at maps for where flood plains are. Do not locate there. Rain will wash out the BOL.

It is not likely, you could camp in a national park of course.

It is more likely, you could camp in a thicket. Really.
This is England, daaaaaahling. It will be cold and wet. Pretty straightforward - layer for Icelandic weather, and strip as appropriate.

I suggest you abandon ideas of neolithic-era survival, unless you will eat rodents and bugs.
*puts away caveman costume* :(

Meat or Fish only is not an adequate diet: you need fat. Break bones for the marrow. You need green vegetation. You need root vegetables.

Like that.
Thanks, I was already aware of the base dietary requirements for humanity ;) I have a great deal of experience in the eating bit, oft to excess I'm saddened to admit!

It is better to purchase food, put it in a cache or several cache.
I have a small cache at home and at work, but it's not high on my list of priorities (see below)

It is better to start a garden, so you know how to have a productive garden.

If you are English and do not garden, hey, what's wrong with you?

Surreptitiously, plant root vegetables near the BOL you plan for.
I have a large allotment, and the contents of my garden. Easily sufficient to feed three with the addition of fats and proteins if I can get meat. Interestingly, not all English people like to garden. Many prefer outbursts of xenophobic aggression and projectile vomiting on statues as a passtime.

I would not waste money on "bushcraft" lessons. Find a boyscout or scoutmaster. Ask for a demonstration of starting a fire with a stick and a bow you make. Then, be smart enough to carry a suitable bit of string in your EDC.
Now THAT is a very good plan! I know a scout master socially! Stupidly I made that mental link. I'm obviously a retard... I was a cubscout as a child and I loathed the experience so much I must be blocking it all out!

Didn't scouting start in UK? Lord Baden Powell was the founder, right?
Dunno!

Purchase sturdy shoes, sturdy socks, sturdy clothing. Hat, gloves.
Already sorted... you mean a wax coat and some wellies, right?:D:

Nah, seriously, my wardrobe is sorted - M65 with liner, poncho for the extra-wetness, good sturdy boots, cargo pants with thermals if needed, heddy, shemagh, beanie if needed and, if not, a rather dashing leather titfa!

Find out what clothing works best in the kind of weather you anticipate.

That's a start.
Don't really get the emphasis there, I must admit... but I'll endeavour to do some research. One sec...

Smudge, Sticks, UK peeps... what clothes should I wear when it's ****ing down in the middle of winter in the south east's balmy climate?
 

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Earthwalker.
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Balance... I was referring to the sanity of learning to ride a motorcycle when I don't have it. Thanks for the stick idea tho...:rolleyes:


Yes, love. I have quite a large one.:D:

Yes, hiking is still a permitted activity, as long as we meet our societal upkeep quotient between jaunts.


No worries here - I'll hop over my garden fence into the woods, or walk out of the hamlet to the top of the valley, for proper forestiness.


After a fair few camping trips (of the family kind, rather than the tarp and camo kind) I'm reasonably certain I could sleep in a shallow pool of fox urine without too much discomfort, hot or cold. And I won't awake til I'm good and ready to, either... I sleep like a corpse!

Good plan, thanks - I'll add it to my list!

This is England, daaaaaahling. It will be cold and wet. Pretty straightforward - layer for Icelandic weather, and strip as appropriate.


*puts away caveman costume* :(

Thanks, I was already aware of the base dietary requirements for humanity ;) I have a great deal of experience in the eating bit, oft to excess I'm saddened to admit!


I have a small cache at home and at work, but it's not high on my list of priorities (see below)


I have a large allotment, and the contents of my garden. Easily sufficient to feed three with the addition of fats and proteins if I can get meat. Interestingly, not all English people like to garden. Many prefer outbursts of xenophobic aggression and projectile vomiting on statues as a passtime.

Now THAT is a very good plan! I know a scout master socially! Stupidly I made that mental link. I'm obviously a retard... I was a cubscout as a child and I loathed the experience so much I must be blocking it all out!


Dunno!

Already sorted... you mean a wax coat and some wellies, right?:D:

Nah, seriously, my wardrobe is sorted - M65 with liner, poncho for the extra-wetness, good sturdy boots, cargo pants with thermals if needed, heddy, shemagh, beanie if needed and, if not, a rather dashing leather titfa!



Don't really get the emphasis there, I must admit... but I'll endeavour to do some research. One sec...

Smudge, Sticks, UK peeps... what clothes should I wear when it's ****ing down in the middle of winter in the south east's balmy climate?
I think you already know what cloths you will need LOL.:thumb:

By the way love your humour:D:
 

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defitnatly take a course it will give you the basics to build on.Beware of the philosphy pushed at some of these classes as some are taught by mental midgits.But the skills are whats important.Seek out a former military survival instructor.with documented experience.
 

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I would be careful practicing fire skills on your own. Some years ago I had a run in with a potty parent, who let his pre-teenagers loose trying to start a fire in an ancient woodland. It had been 90 degrees in the shade for weeks and the whole place was parched, and he wondered why I stood by and supervised them while he went of to get a beer. The police were called, by him, but luckily when I explained the problem he was given a warning.

Even some non-sheeple havent got the common sense they were born with.
 

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Id go visit a bushcraft forum as you will learn a hell of a lot more there than you ever will here.:thumb:
Ain't that the truth ;) I've been lurking more and more of late since there seems to be a rather drastic upsurge in what I like to call "mouth foamers" here at survivalist boards :rolleyes:

I sometimes question the value of pure bushcraft as a survivalist strategy. True, elements of it may well prove very useful, but Britain no longer has any proper untamed wildernesses where you could survive off the land indefinitely.

At the very least if the midden hits the windmill you're going to have to be dealing with a heck of a lot of desperate, displaced urbanites wherever you go.

Ray Mears doesn't say what to do about that:confused:
 

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Yeah, those blummin people who only start threads that bitch and moan about people and things. Why don't more UK people post threads and pictures about the stuff they do and like?
 

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Ello folks,

So, I've spent many a long hour perusing these forums and I have learned a lot... on paper.

I have to say that although many of the things I've seen are globally relevant, the boards are definately States-centric. I was wondering therefore if anyone knew of any UK based resources for similar topics? I had been thinking about pushing my boundaries out into the woods as I said in my greeting post, so thought about maybe heading off to one of those bushcraft courses for some basic skills, then working everything else out for myself... what do you folks think?

Just trying to expand my knowledge base a little in ways that don't have to include "hmm, what gun will I take with me today, the Walther or the Uzi?"
"Primitive skills" is a hobby that many people enjoy. It seems both a noble and wise pursuit. Ray Mears is what he is, a very knowledgeable man who is respected over continents.

Further thought can be taken into urban survival. Chiefly this will entail "preparations". The American model seems entirely suitable and a very "wise" course of action. They have far more experience pertaining to natural disasters than we do. Amongst other people on the web, Kevin the owner of this site has many interesting videos on this subject.

While we don't have the same types of "arms" choice that our American friends enjoy, there are other entirely legal substitutes that you could employ.

YB
 

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Earthwalker.
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Yeah, those blummin people who only start threads that bitch and moan about people and things. Why don't more UK people post threads and pictures about the stuff they do and like?
YB i used to post pictures,do threads and tutorials on bushcraft,knife making and so on on this forum but got very little interest shown.

Why would i waste my time posting my pictures here anymore when the forum has reached rock bottom.

I post the odd thread in the UK section now and then,infact not long ago i posted on a trip to the woods.

Ive all but gave up on this forum and have found other forums that are more suited to my personal skill set and pursuits.

I think some here think bushcraft is a joke but i see bushcraft as a high skill and a continuation of survival skills into not so much survival but living with the land and not just taking from it.

You could say this forum is Bear Grills and i want to be somewhere more Ray Mears.

So i will not be posting anymore pictures,tutorials or any of the knowledge i have gained over the years on this site.
 

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YB i used to post picture,do threads and tutorials on bushcraft,knife making and so on on this forum but got very little interest shown.

Why would i waste my time posting my pictures here anymore when the forum has reached rock bottom.

I post the odd thread in the UK section now and then,infact not long ago i posted on a trip to the woods.

Ive all but gave up on this forum and have found other forums that are more suited to my personal skill set and pursuits.

I think some here think bushcraft is a joke but i see bushcraft as a high skill and a continuation of survival skill into not so much survival but living with the land and not just taking from it.

You could say this forum is Bear Grills and i want to be somewhere more Ray Mears.

So i will not be posting anymore pictures,tutorials or any of the knowledge i have gained over the year on this site.
I'm keen to know what forums you now frequent - sounds like they might be my kind of thing.



I just want some good pointers on preserving food and survival!
 

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YB i used to post picture,do threads and tutorials on bushcraft,knife making and so on on this forum but got very little interest shown.

Why would i waste my time posting my pictures here anymore when the forum has reached rock bottom.

I post the odd thread in the UK section now and then,infact not long ago i posted on a trip to the woods.

Ive all but gave up on this forum and have found other forums that are more suited to my personal skill set and pursuits.

I think some here think bushcraft is a joke but i see bushcraft as a high skill and a continuation of survival skill into not so much survival but living with the land and not just taking from it.

You could say this forum is Bear Grills and i want to be somewhere more Ray Mears.

So i will not be posting anymore pictures,tutorials or any of the knowledge i have gained over the year on this site.
Know what you mean Sticks, and totally agree with you. I'm more into escaping into my local green spaces and the coast around here, without the extreme shoot 'em up worrying about EMP/Revolution stuff that seems to be the passion on the US side of this site.
And it is a bit boring really just reading religious stuff, and being called a submissive Brit all the time because "we let them take our guns".

I'm only preparing for things that are more "likely" to happen in my lifetime - storms/power outages/food distribution breakdowns etc...and my passion for nature/bushcraft is because I actually love doing it (especially with my son), my skills there are kind of secondary to any prep's though because any medium term plans with no food involve fishing, hunting and trapping to supplement my stores. That also includes if I ever lose my job and have to live on £64.30 a week JSA!

If you've found a forum that isn't filled with paranoia, guns, religion, and hatred for healthcare for everyone, but enjoys & respects the nature side whilst sharing a few skills without being called gay/liberal, I'd be grateful for a PM with a link?

Cheers mate, don't wanna lose the input I've enjoyed reading from you...and I'd like to order one of your "curvy" necklace fire-steels sometime as well :thumb:
 
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