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Low speed , High drag
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about getting a few large pots to boil water in for drinking. Need some suggestions on what brands to buy. I'm thinking anywhere from 4 to 10 gallon size.
 

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Low speed , High drag
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1,261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
that is going to take a lot of fuel to boil 4 - 10 gallons.

I would hit ebay or garage / estate sales.
Yea, garage sale season is almost upon us. :D:
 

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Low speed , High drag
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1,261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just use your water bath canning pot. You do have one of those don't you? No? May be time to get one, or two.
I'm really looking for some of the thicker ones.
 

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I would say it again, boiling drinking water is REAL inefficient. There are other ways like treating with chlorox or filtering.

But, big pots are good. Even if you just want a sponge bath, you need something bigger than a sauce pan. Harbor Freight sells a nesting set of stock pots.
 

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How about an old pressure canner? There are a lot of them in junk/antique shops/on eBay. I have a huge one with wooden handles. I wouldn't trust it to pressure can in as I don't know its history, and they don't make gaskets or a replacement gauge for it any more, but it's very thick and would boil a good amount of water. I can also use it as a water bath canner or sterilizer if I need to. I got mine for ~$28 on EBay 2 yrs ago and they threw in free shipping. By the way, NOW is the time to look for one. If you wait much longer, it'll be canning season and the prices will spike.
 

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I got a couple at a restaurant auction. The plates and silverware went for decent prices, even the pans and steam trays weren't cheap. The big pots, they were ridiculously low, unless you were starting a place you already have them and they take up a lot of space.
 

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Mourn, but survive
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616 Posts
Isn't it feasible to "make your own bleach as needed"? Consider this product on Ebay:

"Power Shock 68% Calcium Hypochlorite Swimming "Pool Shock" ( 2 X 1 lb. Bags) for $12.98 on Ebay. [LOTS AND LOTS of offerings for related products in different sizes--or buy it on Amazon...or your local pool store @ retail.]

See discussion about usage for water treatment here: http://www.emergencyhomepreparation.org/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=97


WARNING--LONG QUOTE:

"For granular calcium hypochlorite, 1oz = 50ml = 10.1 teaspoons

"To treat clear raw water with 65-70% calcium hypochlorite there are a couple of ways to do it. If you want to directly treat the water with calcium hypochlorite use the following:

"1 Gallon: add one grain, about the size of the period at the end of this sentence.
55 Gallons: add 1/8 teaspoon for a 5ppm solution.
400 Gallons: add 1 level teaspoon for a 5ppm solution.

"To make a 5% chlorine solution to be able to use the drop method for disinfecting water, add and dissolve add ½ teaspoon of 65-70% calcium hypochlorite to ¾ cup of water. This will decay at the same rate of purchased 5.25% bleach so don't make more than you will use in a fairly short time.

"Here is a detailed conversion chart for using calcium hypochlorite.
http://chppm-www.apgea.army.mil/documen ... ftTBMED577).pdf

"Remember, you want a residual, after treating, concentration of about 0.5 ppm so get "some pdp test material.

"Get a plastic ½ teaspoon and 1 pint - 1 qt plastic bottle and store with your calcium hypochlorite.

"1 pound of calcium chloride will treat about 65,000 gallons of water at an initial 5 ppm concentration.

"Calcium hypochlorite has the major benefit of extended shelf life. Providing it is kept dry, cool and in an airtight container, it may be stored up to 10 years with minimal degradation. If you want to keep chlorine in larger quantities or for a long time, this is the item to store." [END QUOTE]
 

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Closed for the Season.
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15,801 Posts
I don't have a brand recommendation but you can read reviews on Amazon. I like the heavy gauge aluminum ones when you get to the larger gallon sizes for better heat transfer over the stainless steel pots.

Having a few large pots for boiling water for a variety of tasks is a great prep item.
 

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Sgt. Oddball
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749 Posts
I'm really looking for some of the thicker ones.
Thicker takes more fuel to boil the water....if you're trying to retain the heat, thicker is better but you're not trying to cook the water, just boil it.

Not sure if "south of heaven" has restaurant supply stores but pasta pots or brew kettles will do nicely.

http://www.homebrewsupply.com/brewi...g-boiling-supplies/brew-kettles-and-pots.html

AND....after you boil your drinking water, you can do as they did in the Dark Ages and brew your own "drinking" water!
 

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reluctant sinner
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20,097 Posts
I have had a triple bottom stainless steel 16 or 20 quart stock pot with a lid on my wood stove for many years. I originally bought it for canning - I cook my salsa in it. This year I going to do applesauce too. It will also heat enough water to run a solar shower bag in one shot. It has earned its place in my INCH cart.

I also have a big stainless turkey fryer pot with a drain valve. No lid, was a scratch and dent unit. Valve is handy for filling solar shower bag or dish washing. I only use it for water as cleaning out the valve would be a pain.

Next there is a giant aluminum covered stock pot 20+ quart on the wood stove. I just use it to melt snow for doing dishes, showers, flushing the toilet.

Lastly a 4 quart stainless tea kettle.

Mine is different but any of these look good
Amazon.com: New Professional Commercial Grade 32 QT (Quart) Heavy Gauge Stainless Steel Stock Pot, 3-Ply Clad Base, Induction Ready, with Lid Cover NSF Certified Item: Industrial & Scientific

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CONCORD-80-QT-Stainless-Steel-Stockpot-3-Ply-Bottom-/140512602018

I'm guessing there is about 15 gallons of water on the wood stove. Makes a nice thermal mass.

I use the turkey fryer in my covered and screened porch - summer kitchen for canning.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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34,868 Posts
Iodine water purification.
Harbor Freight sells a cheap set of big stainless pots.

Boiling water will use an immense amount of wood or whatever fuel you use.

Also you will build scale on the pot inside (Calcium carbonate) and need to descale it periodically. (strong Acid or chip it out with a chisel or something.) If you still have natural gas, just use a water heater turned up high maybe? Need to see where the relief T/P valve is set first.
 
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