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regular
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen folding saws before, and had usually dismissed them. I do a lot of hiking and camping, and, I don't care where you are at, it isn't really camping without an evening camp fire.

I had never been one for the folding saw thing, small firewood, I would just break with my knee or foot. Larger stuff, just adjust every 15-20 minutes as the fire burns down.

Was helping a friend on his property last spring, and among some other things, he needed to clear some small brush and such, did that work with a small (10" to 12" estimate) hand held folding saw. The tool worked well for him, and, I re-evaluated my stance on the whole folding saw thing.

Anyway, to the meat of this thread, wondering if anyone has, has used, possibly has a place where one might purchase a significantly larger folding saw.

How large, I'm speculating approx. 1 yard/1 meter. Source.

Please reference this youtube video.


:17 thru :44 seconds in.

If you have one or have used one, wondering how practical a folding saw of this size might be. Especially, for someone who isn't as muscle bound as the bearer in the video.

I also searched Amazon for this, or something similar. Probably just putting in the wrong terms, but the largest my search terms turned up were around 15". Assuming that one of these large folding saws might be useful to add to my inventory, wondering if anyone else might have a source.

Thanks for looking.
 

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Thank you, Jerry.

Ouch, Pricey indeed. But man, would those have a mechanical advantage over a traditional bow saw. One of my major beefs with same over the years is the need to kneel in order to use one quite often. That and the short strokes and the limited diameter you could cut due to the 'throat' necessitated by the bow itself.

RR
 

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reluctant sinner
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17,912 Posts
I think a Buck Saw would do the job nicely. A 18" blade can cut threw a 9" log with 50% or more stroke at all times. I'm making one with Birdseye maple and white ash using Wyoming saw blades. The blades come in both wood and bone tooth pattern. I have the caring case made from 3" PVC with a screw on and glue on end cap. Will hold all the saw parts, extra blades, files, a 1" x 16" wood drill bit. Still need to design and build a bit holder that will attach to the storage tube to make a T handle. Will make a cricket to fit on the fixed cap so I can keep the teeth set. I will also have a 1 1/8" peg maker for pinning logs together for shelter construction.

You can make a field expedient bow saw with a saw blade and rings/cord using a sapling. Very light weight but works best only on the pull stroke. Doesn't work as well on thick logs unless you have access to all side.



I have a Swen Saw but I don't enjoy using it.
 

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Over and Out
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.....If you have one or have used one, wondering how practical a folding saw of this size might be. ..
Absolutely Recommend the 'Silky' line.. Yeah, they're 'pricey', but this is one case where you Do 'get what you pay for' - The Japanese steel / teeth-design is just outstanding, IMExperience, and cuts like butter.. Even the smaller '180'-size pocket-saw blows other past ones away (ie: Fiskars, etc) at Speed / staying sharp.. And even the 650 (gigantic..) is reasonable (weight-wise) to carry...

..The only 'down side' (if this can even be Considered-such..) is that Since it cuts on the Pull-stroke, only, you sort of have to 'reset your muscle-memory training' for that, vs a push-stroke, but.. Actually, I find you expend Less energy, that way - just Relax, and Let the saw do the work, and this pup Really-does.. :cool:

..We got ours from this guy (..and, Not 'endorsing him', per-se, but Pricing was better than US-suppliers - ended up being about $215. USD) and Free Shipping (since the Order is "over $250." (CAN) so.. Hard to beat this guy's Offering:

https://www.canadianpreparedness.com/products/katanaboy-650mm-long-term-off-grid-saw/ ..Freaking Love it, gotta say.. Veritable man-powered Chainsaw.. :thumb:

Fwiw..
jd
 

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Plus one for:

https://www.canadianpreparedness.com/

I am endorsing this guy, he is a small business guy, youtuber and prepper.

His youtube channel, so you can judge his character.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfgtuaUadGgOA-91geQ8Qog


As for the choice of saws I personally own the:

KatanBoy 500--as opposed to the 650 in the video.
Silky Bigboy XL teeth, and purchased the optional sheath.
Agawa Canyon folding bucksaw.
A big box store bowsaw for $30...it sucks and lets not discuss it further.

The Katanaboy is a basecamp saw, or to toss in the back of the jeep. I'm not a big guy, but with this tool I can cut down any tree that a chainsaw can cut down. I wear the sheath like a quiver, or tucked into the side pocket of my 48L backpack. It is however overkill for most jobs as the space required to operate the saw in the bush is tight. Again, it is best suited for a basecamp with a dedicated sawhorse for cutting wood.

The Silky Bigboy, is my preferred bushsaw. It has a slight curve on the blade which more than makes up for it's lack of blade length. It can cut fallen trees from the bottom up, even when the tree is very close to the ground, whereas the Katana and Canyon saws cannot even think about doing those things. Limbing trees is very easy, as the blade can sneak in among the branches and quickly do what needs to be done. It is my saw of choice for trail clearing.

The Agawa Canyon is the lightest of these saws, and I have also purchased a quiver style sheath for it. While it can do the work of the Bigboy in the bush, it is better suited to camp work while you have some sort of sawhorse, or similar style setup. It can still cut fairly large wood, and is the easiest to make one piece of wood into two pieces of wood....but the design does limit the diameter of the wood you can cut. I really like this for hot tenting in the winter, for its ergonomic design around camp.

To sum it up these three are all high quality saws that will last a long time, and do a superior job at cutting wood. I am extremely pleased with all of them, but the Katana is by far a luxury or long term survival item. The backpackers choice will be between the Bigboy or Canyon, depending on the task at hand.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Silky Katanaboy is worth checking on Ebay. Prices get down close to $100 instead of the typical $150 and up and up.

Otherwise look into the Bob Dustrude Quick Buck Saw. They fold up real nice and come in 21", 24", and 30" models. Built like a tank and run between $55 and $70 for the different sizes.
 

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As with most things, the best one is the one that's with you when you need it. This would be nice for a planned outing or to keep in a car or airplane.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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I have a $6 pruning/trimming saw I got from Ace Hardware. I have had it for years and years now, and use it every time I am out.

If I ever manage to break it, I may get a Silky or Bacho...but this cheap Ace hardware pruning saw is really light too. Has a pine handle that weighs like nothing.

I show it somewhere in the "Whats in my pack" video below.

 

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In Memory
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