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Super Moderator wearing a Cape
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
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Greetings fellow survivalists,

And yet again I have the distinct privilege of announcing a new contest here at SurvivalistBoards

The Setup:

Once again, the moderator team has been contacted by a long term members who wanted to share some good fortune with the membership by sponsoring a giveaway.

As before, this contest is not sponsored, endorsed or otherwise affiliated with Vertical Scope, Second Media, or any of the various owners, advertisers, and what have you.

The Contest:

For this contest, we are asking for a short essay of less than 500 words that answer these two questions.
1. What started you down the road to preparedness (why are you preparing)?
2. Who are you preparing for?

OPSEC of course is encouraged, but tell the story in a manner that the reader has a reason to start preparing themselves.

Punctuation and grammar are appreciated but have no bearing in the contest.

The Rules:
  • 1. UNLIKE previous contests, this one is being offered to all members in good standing regardless of location. The caveat to this is if your location has a restriction on shipping knives, we will have to substitute a prize of our choosing.
  • 2. The chosen winner will need to provide a Name and a Shipping Address to the Mod team (via PM). We will not share this with anyone outside of our team.
  • 3. One entry per individual per contest.
    4. The contest thread is for actual entries only, general comments will be removed.
  • 5. All regular forum rules apply.
  • 6. Failure to follow the rules will result in forfeiture of entry into the contest.
The Prize:

Winner gets to choose one of the following:

1) Cold Steel SRK
2) Ontario Knife Co. Spec Plus Alpha
3) Kabar USMC
4) Gerber Strongarm

Watch Rectangle Tool Everyday carry Knife






The Deadline:

This contest will run through Labor Day, September 5th 2022 and will conclude at 3pm PDT (-7 off Zulu)
All entries must be posted prior to 3pm PDT
Drawing and announcement of the winner will follow.
 

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Thanks Mr. Cannonfoddertfc. I'm new to your community.

What got me started in being prepared? The Boy Scouts. It's always been in my blood since I was a teenager and I'm 67 y/o now.
2. My wife and I are stocking for us, her 88 y/o mother ad the elderly couple who live next door. They're in their 80's and 90's.
I'd like to thank the mods for welcoming me to y'all's community
I'd also like to add something to my post above. Right or wrong, good or bad, left or right...It is of my humble opinion that prices of everything will spike after the up and coming midterms. I don't care who comes out on top.
You'd better prep now like there's no tomorrow. Kick it in the big gear. Just my 2 cents worth.
 

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Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum
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I guess I got started with Prepping around 2012 to 2013. North Korea was threatening to Nuke America on a daily basis as they were trying to develop long range Nuclear capabilities.

So I started by stockpiling food and learning about water purification and as I worked I bought various items that I thought I might need. Such as NBC suits and Protective masks. Medical supplies, and KI pills. An old Victoreen 715 Geiger Counter and different Military gear I have not used since my days in the Army.

I started prepping for my then wife and myself originally but then I started getting grandchildren and decided to prep for them as well. Luckily in my fears of a nuclear war breaking out, my preps carried over to the Pandemic that would hit us in 2020. I had plenty of food and water, Way more medical supplies than I used and had enough toilet paper stored to last me through the shortages.

Since I started participating in the discussions at Survivalist Boards, I have learned much more than I originally thought I might need. And my time there has taught me that no matter what gear you own, no tool is as valuable as Knowledge and experience. I still fear a Nuclear exchange between our country and another but now I am more rounded in my approach and place my skill set (Which is still developing) as the most valuable asset I own in my endeavor. I believe that I can survive almost any catastrophe that I could possibly face. I also take great pleasure in teaching my Girlfriend's son about survival techniques. He turned 16 this past August and never knew how to cast an open face real for fishing. I taught him how to do that and since then he has wanted to learn everything I can possibly teach him. I am going to start teaching him how to start and build a fire for cooking and warmth next week and I have shown him how to handle various wildlife that we have in our area. He loves it when I catch things like snakes and Opossums and then take them out to the woods and let them go. I let him take photos of the animals while I am still holding them, and when he feels brave enough, I let him touch each animal. I also teach him about the dangers that each animal has with it.

So now I prep for myself, My girlfriend, her son and my grandchildren. I look forward to learning new things from the fine folks at Survivalist Boards and also teach My future step son the things I learn while there.
 

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Self Sufficiency and abandoning modern culture.

I'm currently 22 at this date of age and live in greece, left poland couple of months ago and I'm half greek half pole.

The reason i started prepping is simple the reason people hunger and fail in their lives just because they don't prepare for the roadblocks ahead, sadly, here in europe people have the tendency to rely on the government and companies to live (one example would be germany where a friend of mine had to leave because the TAX on his business is so high that he is not making any profit, the reason for so high tax ? people only 20% of that tax goes to government affairs all else goes to feed the people that stay in their homes and rely on government funding because of their kids or whatever). Knowing my generation is doomed and the newer generation is will also be doomed just because almost everyone has forgotten the reality of living and live in the comfort that modern lives provide us. The system our cities and societies are build on are not solid they are not something i can wake up to tomorrow and say everything is the same, the rulers are humans too and they also have feeling make mistakes and have their own ways of stupid, but that doesn't mean me and others will have to suffer while they are playing with fire and we want a fruitful life or what we call the American/any other country dream.

Knowing all that and knowing I can actually do something to protect myself, my neighbor, my friend, and my future wife/kids makes me feel good it gives me some amount of security that no government can give me even if this means stocking up on food/making it, learning to use guns/other weapons, survival techniques like animal breeding and knowing how to live of the land what we call primitive human survival knowing what wild plant is going to kill me or not gives me a security that others in my generation wont have as they just complain about the problems that they cannot control but can control the outcome or at least make it easier for them and anyone else they care about.

Knowing all this and getting prepared in our current state of the world bring me back to times in history in my own bloodline where people where in trenches and endured only the souls know what and hard times arose allot of people died but times have changed you can take action and give it forward to the next generation your kids and so on preparing you, your offspring and anyone else give you the feeling that even if the world ends TEOTWAKI or anything else you will still be better of some people and will be able to help your self, and other that you don't care about to create strong bonds and create communities more powerful that any government can promise and fix anything that we could not control the reason of the happening.

This, is why i got into prepping.
 

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History repeats itself so, I started Preparing for the Repeats. For example, there is a 40% chance of a major earthquake here on the New Madrid fault in Eastern Missouri. The last major earthquake here was a SERIES of close to 9.0 quakes which literally made the Mississippi River flow backward and it had waterfalls in it. Just read eye-witness accounts, they thought it was the end of the World it was so bad. Ball-lightning, lakes disappearing and appearing, whole stands of very large forests disappearing below ground. Its coming around again but, this time with Nuclear Reactors in the area and a Nuclear Waste Dump buried under West St. Louis. Make no mistake, WHEN this happens again, a large amount of Elderly, sick, homeless and disaffected will die rapidly and the other 80% will historically struggle just to get water for tomorrow(HUGE maybe).
As for the second question, I Prep for myself. Trying to Prep for others I don't see as practical. I'd be someone going around with bags of Pool-Shock to treat water,that's about it.
Thanks Much
 

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The idea of being a prepper started when I was in the Boy Scouts. As an Eagle Scout I embraced the Boy Scout motto of "be preppared" to the extreme. I have been on many camping trips that nearly went horrible due to poor planning. Imagine 12 scouts going camping and I being the only one to bring a fire starter. Events like that opened my eyes to how badly others are preppared for even simple everyday things.

As of right now I am mostly prepping for my family of 3 and our two Border Collies. Prepping for a growing toddler is hard but prepping when she is also autistic makes it even more difficult. Trying to provide the same comforts that are need now to get through a day during the collapse is a challenge. Plus waste is way higher (just yesterday she shredded a whole roll of aluminum foil for fun).

I am also working on building up supplies for our neighbors. Such as simple bulk foods and informational resources. Also trying to be on good terms with all of them by being friendly and doing small favors for each other. Being surrounded by friends is worth the extra effort and money.

--------------------------------

The prizes look awesome. Thanks for the contest.
 

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As kid I was in the Boy Scouts of America and soon realized the advantage of being prepared .
They taught a broad based, practical preparedness to augment my everyday life.

I will never forget my first pocket knife.10 years old , a two blade Swiss army knife, given to me by my Dad.
At a pre teen age I was taught self reliance as a way of life. Having that pocket knife made me more
confident, more assured.
More Able.

I am 58 now and have evolved far beyond the pocket knife of my childhood.
The lessons of preparedness as a helpful tool in my life started as a boy and have continued to
enhance my and now my family's lives to this day.

Being prepared is being reliable. A great feeling for me.
A low key , non consuming , common sense prepared lifestyle.
Someone said to me once, begrudgingly "Everything comes easy to you".
I had no response this person would understand ,so I stayed quiet.

I believe Chance favors the prepared .
Best thing is to be kind to the less fortunate and hope they will come around.
What was the kids game hide and seek ( READY OR NOT, HERE I COME ) !!
It still applies. Everywhere, everyday.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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I grew up in a fairly outdoors type family hunting fishing camping small family farm etc. on the west coast. I was used to earthquakes and fires but as a kid I was not educated to the long term ramifications on what can happen. Only some basic kits and unrealized elder family knowledge.

It was Sept 89 and hurricane Hugo in my mid 20s that was my reality check. I knew it was coming, I saw the news/weather, but had never been near one or had much exposure to the aftereffects. I was in Givhans way inland so not too worried. I boarded up as best I could, and I didn’t want to be in the trailer. So I grabbed a water jug, some chips, and my blanket and pillow to ride it out in my truck. Don’t do this……

It came in the dark of the night, wind howling debris flying and even with headlights and wipers I could see nothing. At one point the wind was so loud and the truck shook like a train was on top of me. I didn’t sleep that night.

As the light broke I could see the damage, my truck wasn’t where I parked it tornadoes had been close and pushed me in the mud, my neighbor’s house was cut in half, my other neighbors trailer was exploded with nothing but pink insulation and a frame. Mine survived with only a broken window.

My driveway was under 4feet of water not going anywhere, no power no water. It took 4 days of road clearing and chainsaws to get back. It took almost a month before the power was restored in this back dirt road area.

I took rain showers, rinsed off with bottled water, depended on local help and helped as I could moving downed trees. Getting through this would entail a story of more than 500 words so another day.

That was my start to self-realization of what SHTF can be. I was lucky but it caused me to start my journey into self dependence and have passed on what I could to my family over the years. Not smooching for points but this site has let me take huge strides on this path and I enjoy passing on relevant information I have learned. As well and some darker humor

Its never too late to start and learn, it clicked on the light “be prepared” a scouting moto. This is not something that can be acquired overnight it is pilgrimage worth traveling.
 

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Always Loaded
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I started researching preparedness after the birth of my first child. I wanted to be capable of protecting and providing for her in every conceivable situation. My future wife and I were living in a tiny 2 bedroom apartment. I started reading, and learning on this very site. I quickly realized that the foundations of prepping had already been instilled in my as a child. Hunting, butchering, gardening, canning, foraging, were all part of my upbringing.

That little apartment was 12 years ago. I now have 5 more children and live in a 4 bedroom home with 3/4 acre. I have learned many skills in this 12 years. We grow a large percentage of our own vegetables and fruits. We raise rabbits and chickens. We learned to dehydrate, can, and ferment our crops. I learned to reload ammunition. To cast my own bullets. Basic gun smithing. To tap maple trees. Grow and cure tobacco. Taken first aid trauma classes and built a modest medical supply setup. Built water collection and filtration setups at our home, among many others things.

Preparedness, above all has improved the lives of my family. It has pushed us outside, to try new things, and to learn. It has built us into a stronger family. Contrary to the common belief that preppers are overwhelmed with anxiety, this has allowed us to be much more confident and at peace. The last two years provided a great example. We were not concerned at all about shortages and lock downs. We had everything we needed. I will remember the 8 week COVID "shut down" period in my area to be one of the best times in my memory. Time spent completely free of society and alone with my family.

Prepping is self reliance. Self reliance is the return to what God always intended. It is the return to normal.
 

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Hello, first of all thanks for the contest, the knives seems all awesome ! As I say in the text I am French, so I don't necessarily have all the "jargon" specific to English survivalism. I hope that this will not be too much of a problem, anyway here is my text:

I live in France, and here we have problems that other countries do not necessarily have. In particular terrorists attacks, which periodically strike the country, and which are always followed by moments of great tension.

Tension on the place of the act on one hand, as for example after the attack of Nice, or a train derailment, we saw groups of "French of paper" (I will remain correct) looting the bodies of the victims.

Community tensions on the other hand, since all these events tend to separate the population into two groups, which end up hating each other deeply and both considering themselves as victims. This is all part of the crowd mechanism, and there is nothing I can do about it.

However, the consequences of this are foreseeable, as they could eventually lead to a civil war in my opinion. Even our current president has recognized this.

I started preparing myself, after the attacks in Nice. First of all, it was only a physical and psychological preparation. Running, endurance, fighting. Crowd management, group management, risk management. Rediscovering the values of before as well. I made my own the old values of the early days of the Roman Republic, where even the best generals were only humble farmers in times of peace.

Fides - Pietas - Majestas - Virtus - Gravitas - Constantia - Frugalitas.

Faithfulness - devotion - dignity - courage - respect for tradition - stability - frugality.

All this made me a better “myself”, more accomplished and thoughtful. It wasn't really a preparation for a "collapse", but it’s still a first step.

Then, slowly but surely, I started to get interested in more global perspectives. It was probably my knowledge of economics that made me realize that the economic system was flawed, that it would probably collapse in my lifetime. Today, when the price of electricity has increased by 1000% (and still growing !), I know that I was right in my calculation, and that I have a considerable advantage over other French people to survive what is coming.

It's not too late for the others, but they have to realize that serious economic troubles are coming, that our people have a certain tendency to get rid of their ruler in such moments, and that this generates a lot of instability. And that it is in such moments that it is important to depend as much as possible on yourself or your team.

Today I managed to convince my brother of the need to prepare himself. So we are preparing together, and a little against the will of our parents. We will save them in spite of them, as I like to say.
Also, I know that my long-time girlfriend's father and brother are in the same mindset, so I'm not worried about her, and I think we will form a first group with their family.
We have a lot of documentation, knowledge and materials. They will learn when they see the need and become as prepared as we are.

We will save them against their will.
 

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1. What got me into prepping?

Back in 1996 I was an active duty US Army first lieutenant stationed at Fort Hood Texas and living in tiny town called Lampasas. My unit was tasked to complete a 30-day assignment in the Mojave Desert (Fort Irwin, CA).

My wife (a West German National) was very concerned for her safety because many homes had recently been broken into. To add insult to injury, when we married, she was very clear that she DID NOT want firearms on the house. We were essentially unarmed and I was leaving town.

As I was leaving, she once again conveyed her fears. I replied "too bad we don't own any guns." I pointed at our elderly, German shepherd mix dog and replied "Well... I gotta go. I hope Mino will take care of you." Mino looked up, yawned and went back to sleep.

Fast forward 30 years: She has her own collection of guns. (And I do too!). :)

2. Who are you prepping for?

Easy: My wife, me, and my community.

We have no kids and very little family. I am only truly only responsible for myself and my wife. Over the course of the past two years, I have become heavily involved in local politics. It's actually been an exciting experience and the local community has become part of my "inner circle".

Even though I serve in a low-level appointed position, the amount of positive change that I can bring is huge. Things that I think are easy, are very difficult for others. And vice versa. I have a skill set that my community needs; and we need them.

Prepping isn't a one man show. There's strength in numbers.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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I gotta give my dad credit for teaching me to be prepared for day to day situations. He not only explained the importance of having the right tools and equipment around but he set a daily example. He could always tackle a tough situation with little to no help. He planted the seed.

Then, when I married my first wife (late 1970s into the early 1980s), we ended up living with her very strict, Mormon parents up in Logan, UT. I was around 20 at the time. They were preppers to the max! They had the proverbial root cellar; livestock; chickens; stacks and stacks of firewood; crops; and they canned tons of food. Their house (that they built themselves) was surrounded by several acres of land in each direction. Although I didn't really understand the need to prep at the time, their tenacity made sense later on in my life and I was glad for the experience of actually participating in THEIR preps even if I didn't know what I was doing. They were good people.

Then Y2K came along and all the fearmongering and claims that the world was about to end literally got me into buying lots of canned goods, water, and silver. I was around 40 at the time. I started to see why prepping might be a good thing to do. I think some of this change in thinking came with age, experience, and maturity. When Y2K came and went and nothing happened ... I sort of slacked off and focused on other things. That is until the economic crash of 2008 (I was around 48). That's when I really started opening my eyes and taking things more seriously. It's when I found this forum and became a member.

There were also times in my life when I was nearly destitute and wondering what I was going to do next. There were times I had to improvise and just make the best of whatever situation I found myself in. I'm not a genius but I'm not stupid either. Sometimes basic common sense mixed with a little logic and whatever charm I could muster did the trick. Having a certain amount of faith doesn't hurt either.

I can never forget the major ice storm that occurred in Wheat Ridge, CO that knocked our power out for nearly three days. While everyone else was panicking, I had my propane heater; lanterns; extra food and water; and other survival tools and equipment to keep myself, my wife, and her son living in relative comfort. I was probably around 50 or so at the time.

So here we are. We all see what's on the horizon. I, for one, am grateful for what I've learned and what I've been able to accomplish in terms of prepping. I've learned how to freeze dry my own food (let alone have plenty of food on hand). I think this is the most valuable "talent" I've learned of late. But I also have every kind of bug-out equipment and survival tools a man can have. Most of my inspiration has come from this site but I'm also inspired (in a reverse sort of way) by all the people who haven't prepared at all. I feel sorry for them in a way. But their lack of preparedness inspires me to continue preparing. At 62 years old ... taking care of myself has never been more important.
 

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Very nice of you to offer this. Thanks. I don't need more knives, but I certainly would not turn down an SRK if offered.

1. Boy Scouts
2. Life is boring for the most part, and prepping is kinda like a chess match. How prepared can I be, and how little can I spend to do it. Will I win, or will SHTF beat me?
3. To help others that will not be prepared.
4. I like life, and I want to hold onto it.
5. My family.
 

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How I started.... I grew up with parents that were young adults of the 1930s, 1940s grandparents that were young adults of the 1890s, WW1 generation.. There parents immigrant homesteaders to the western mountains and prairies.. Fast forward to the approach of Y2K, a young family, our first computer and many other things.. This with the above background led to a need to prep for the times.... Having a spouse that did not understand, participate made it tough.. Even with the many small instances where prepping saved the day along the way.. Family grown, new spouse that is totally on board, and an amazingly knowledgeable and skilled prepper.. Much more so than I.. You look up the definition of "far north bush woman" and there will be a picture of Sweetie...


To answer the question ..who are we preparing for.. At this point in life that answer is Sweetie and I... We are retired, healthy all considered, comfortable in our location and set up where we have chosen, I think the new term is to "Alamo" That is to bunker into our nest here in the far north for the remainder of our earthly days...

 

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What started me down the road to prepping?:
Raised by a Depression Era father and a WWII Berlin survivor mother. Wanting to make sure my wife and myself could face the unknown with minimal worries.

Who am I prepping for?:
For myself now. My beautiful wife passed away last year and now I am on my own.
Mission is the same just have to make some adjustments.

Al
 

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I suppose I did not start down a path of preparedness, I was born into it. I grew up in a rural area where preparedness was part of every day life for my family and pretty much everyone else. We did not make daily trips to the grocery store or have all the modern conveniences of the era. We treated everything with respect, we immediately repaired anything in need, and we planned ahead for every contingency. We filled our freezer by hunting or by purchasing eggs, milk, and meat from local farmers/ranchers. We had a large garden which we supplemented by helping others with their even larger gardens. We canned our food and had a well stocked root cellar. We had more guns than average, or so it seemed, and we reloaded ammo all year long. Both my parents carried guns everywhere we went and it seemed odd to see a vehicle that did not have a couple long guns in the back window. Every event that happened, whether it be nature or caused by man, seemed like a minor inconvenience. I never saw fear in my parent's eyes. I saw people who were ready for whatever came their way.

When I left home I quickly discovered a world where community gave way to selfishness. Where people just threw away things that didn't work and ran to the hardware store for every thing little thing. Families who ate more often at a cafe than a kitchen table. Huge groceries store where vegetables came in a can and meat in a tube. Where hunting was bad because someone watched the movie "Bambi" and thought it was real. People who begged for money and others who felt entitled to something without working for it. And a darkness that I never saw or felt back home. A creepy underbelly that I believe has grown and expanded 10x over since then. But as bad as that darkness was/is, even worse was how the way these people lived was so fragile than any disruption was going to result in panic. Panic that could, and sometimes did, result in catastrophe.

My work took me to places that were even worse. Places where it seemed like they were already living a post-apocalyptic life. Where simple survival required non-stop effort and often times the mercy or grace of others. I have spent much of my life on watch, contemplating how the world we live in has devolved into something so much less than it was. How people worship actors and athletes, stare at screens all day long, and live posh and cushy lives. And they do so with a single thought or care for the blood, sweat, and tears of others. Some that came before and some that are protecting them or providing for them this very minute.

Now, other than the occasional contract job, I stay home. Home where preparedness is about being adaptable, educated, adequately stocked, and fully awake. Awake to what can happen in the world to interrupt or end our current way of life without notice. Awake to the powers that be and their disregard for you, me, and life itself. Awake to a world designed to make us dependant and dumb. I live a life that emphasizes self preservation and survival through time tested methodologies. I live a life of freedom and self-sufficiency. I am prepared because I was born it to it. I am awake because of the path I have travelled. I will survive because I refuse not to. I do this for myself. I do this for anyone that is like-minded and resides within my circle of trust.
 

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I've had survivalism in my blood, to some extent, for as long as I can remember. When I was very young I lived on a ranch and I would stay gone all day (until my parents freaked out and hunted me down) doing as I pleased, and eating only what I could gather outside. Fruit off the trees, walnuts, blackberries, horse grain. When I became a little older my dad taught me to fish. I would fish for koi in the horse troughs with hooks made out of baling wire and worms scavenged from under the lumber pile. I would burrow into the composting manure pile on frosty winter mornings to keep warm.

Looking back on those days, I think the single biggest influence in my prepper ways was my dad. He taught me about camping, making a fire, fishing and shooting. I learned to read the rivers of the Pacific Northwest and how to drive boats in them. I was taught that when I drove into the mountains to always fill the gas tank up first. To keep a flashlight and some extra water and a jacket handy.

Now I'm an adult and my dad, who was once an avid outdoorsman, has become increasingly sedentary and unprepared. I think that when we both lost our homes in the wildfire back in 2018 it took something from him. I have my own children now, and we often check in on my dad in his old age. He has been stubborn about not keeping more than a few days worth of food in his home. All his camping gear burned in the fire and he didn't replace it. So I secretly stock extra at my house, along with stores for myself and my kids. Although he doesn't realize it, I prep for 4 instead of just myself and kiddos. And in this way, we come full circle. As he ages, it's my turn to prepare for his well being instead of him preparing for my well being.
 

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The road which started my journey into preparedness started early in life. After moving from middle class normalities.
Parents chosen poverty came slowly into view. Of course, as a very young child this aspect is not identified until entering the school system. Even then, it took several years in the rural area I was raised. Recognition of the difference inspired me to begin working at the age of ten. In doing so I gained a tangible amount of independence. Skipped the comic books, BMX bikes, moon boots etc and purchased needed I would not be receiving from parents.

Later enjoyed living on the edge, traveling, different high risk employment, pay check to pay check sometimes. But began to remember my Grandfathers basement store. He was born 1918, and saw plenty of less, before plenty of more, became American. Thus had reserves of needed, shelved in the basement like a store. I loved seeing the food and supplies on hand. Instantly ready when kitchen cupboard supply was depleted. Wisely, Grandad only went to the store once a week, and it was only a ten minute drive.

Now I enjoy my own store. The shelving is taller and deeper. The diversity is far greater and selectively organic and natural (non-GMO) foods when applicable. Additionally the store has what people need for "if and when". Plenty of toiletries long before the Pandemic TP Run. From power outages to snowstorms we are, girlfriend and grown boys, a local hardware without the cashier's counter. For me and ones now accustomed to such. This is invaluable peace of mind. Easily gained at a minimal cost when frequently purchasing on sale. Peace of mind can propagate... more peace of mind and healthfully reasoned pursuit thereof.
 

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Super Moderator wearing a Cape
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ok folks, I have to ask you to bear with me... for those that are familiar with the expression "herding cats", that is what it is like trying to pin down the 10 judges we set up for this contest.

And of course to further confuse the situation, nobody... and I do mean nobody can derail a conversation better than a group of moderators.

Facepalm.png



Based on current rate of movement... we should be announcing the winner this next weekend...

Hang tight, we will get it done.
 
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