Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got this recipe at a different forum. It looked so tasty!!! I love Quince! So here you go! :) :thumb:

-------------------------------------------

Kweepeergelei is simply "Quince Jelly" in dutch. I made some quince jelly last year, but it turned out yellowish and thin. The jam on the other hand was dry and extremely thick. This year, I resolved to do it differently.

The quinces were cut into small pieces, placed in a large pot and boiled for three hours.



Next the pulp was ladled out of the liquid and placed in a collander lined with a thin cloth.



It was allowed to sit for three hours and drip until the pulp was dry. Some folks leave the pulp to drip overnight.



We then tossed the pulp into the bin and poured the liquid back into the pot that the pulp had been boiled in originally. --Some folks use this pulp to make Membrillo. Membrillo is the Spanish word for quince, I believe...but the paste that they make they use differently than I do.

The fluid is brought back to a boil and then an equal amount of sugar is added while stirring.



Once boiling, the liquid jelly is poured into sterile pots and capped.

**At this point some people add a sprig of Rosemary into the pot before pouring the boiling jelly in. I am not ready for Rosemary early in the morning, but if one uses quince jelly with Rosemary for meats--then it's a whole other thing. Tasty.



The leftover jelly was put into a little "restaurant jelly container" for using on toast at the breakfast table.



**I do not believe that one needs to use pectin if they boil the liquid down a bit (by not more than 1/3).

This year I am delighted with how the quince jelly turned out and while I would recommend it to anyone, I must say that the jelly does have a distinct aeromatic quality that makes me think of lokum (Turkish Delight). For that reason it's worth sampling before making a large amount. I find the flavour delightful, but everyone's taste can be different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
That's a good recipe and I make a similar one. You can use other fruit very successfully like this too, eg tart apples or crab apples as 4gunny suggests, and plums, the sourer the better.
Here's an easy recipe for PERFECT QUINCE JELLY
4lb (about 8) quinces, firm, not too ripe
4lb sugar
4pints water
Wash the quinces. Dissolve the sugar in the water. Simmer the WHOLE quinces in the sugar syrup for exactly 4 hours. Remove the quinces and eat them hot or cold with cream. Pour the hot jelly into sterilized jars and seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Quinces should grow anywhere that crab apples grow. They are considered an old-fashioned fruit here, but they are making a bit of a comeback. They are usually available here at the end of autumn to early winter.
 

·
Silent Defender
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
The quice jam I made a couple weeks ago, I used the bush variety. I minced them up really fine and left them in the mix for an added texture. I also added zest from one lemon and the juice from half of it. It is delicious!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Yes, the variety I prefer to use is the smaller bush or wild quinces. They seem to have more flavour and pectin. I used to live in a country town that had quinces, pears, figs and mulberries growing wild alongside the roads and creeks and in the national park. Gee, I miss that place!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top