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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in another thread but thought this would get more eyeballs with it's own thread.
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Any recommendations for a fool proof knife sharpener? I have one of these and it works fine but I'd like something better, I'm not good with a stone.
 

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I have a lansky sharpener. It does good, holds everything tight and has holes for getting the right angle

 

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I collect this kind of sharpener, just to show people how useless they are. get on youtube and find one of the hundreds of videos on how to use a set of stones.

lifelong observation: people who think they know how to sharpen a knife don't have a clue. butchers, wood carvers, people who need a sharp knife to perform a task, learn how to sharpen a knife as as a step to another skill. they are the ones to ask, not people who think sharpening the knife is an end to the task.

if the person who claims to be an expert does not vary the angle from the straight part through the curve, he's a bull**** artist. so those sticks that hold the blade at a fixed angle are a joke. you want the curve sharp enough to cut the crossword puzzle from a newspaper without tearing the paper.

if they demonstrate how sharp a knife is by slicing a tomato ninja style, they are a bull**** artist. if they slash a piece of paper and get a massive cut with no tearing, they got it right.

in re oil: if you have stones only for utility knives, use ATF for oil. any is better than none, because none clogs the pores of the stones. if you have stones resevred for food preparation knives, either buy waterstones, or use cooking oil, to keep the knives food safe.

if a stone lets oil puddle in the middle, use another stone to lap it flat.
 

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Those units in the OP aren’t “sharpeners” IMHO, they are just modern versions of the old steel. I have Gerbers, Smiths, Camillus, Rapala....but they’re all just Chinese stuff in the end. I like the Camillus Glide one because it includes Torx drivers and a flathead on the unit.

They are good for aligning the blade during use, but eventually, you still need to get on a stone and sharpen the thing.

I have a large double sided water stone. It works well.
If you aren’t good at it,,,,well, it’s a skill. Buy a cheap knife and a stone, and practice until you can do it right. It’s a good investment in yourself.
 

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Get a stone. Those V shaped things that you drag your edge through are total junk. I have a small diamond flat sharpener but the diamonds get worn down. A water stone is the only real way to get a sharp knife. Brand dosnt really matter but the japanese make good ones. A dual sided one with say 1000/3000 is a prety decent start. Granted since you have been useing that thing in the original post you may want to start with something more course than 1000 grit.
 

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I like the Worksharp as well. Have the Ken Onion edition.

Have a metric crap ton of knives that needed sharpening, and did about a half dozen pretty quick. There is a short learning curve, and I could get a bit better at it, but managed to get them mostly shaving sharp without the final stropping belt.
 

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DMT stones work well for most jobs and are easy enough for beginners to use! Arkansas and waterstones are where you end up if you’re serious about it!

A Ceramic stone or two mixed with a DMT stone or two will do more than most ever ask of them! Spend the time researching and learning how to use them!

SD
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Get a stone. Those V shaped things that you drag your edge through are total junk. I have a small diamond flat sharpener but the diamonds get worn down. A water stone is the only real way to get a sharp knife. Brand dosnt really matter but the japanese make good ones. A dual sided one with say 1000/3000 is a prety decent start. Granted since you have been useing that thing in the original post you may want to start with something more course than 1000 grit.
Some great suggestion thanks to all, I was hoping for something easy but it may be worth getting better with using the stone. I currently have a 100/240 grit I'm thinking of getting another either 400/1000 or 1000/6000.
 

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We have a couple hand held sharpeners with carbide inserts that came from the marine store by the fish cannery...

They work very well..
 

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I use the lansky for my basic work. i have lots of flat water stones to do touch up stuff. those V blocks car ruin your blade. The ones which use a carbide wedge will vibrate and put a wavy edge on your blade. the ones using a round crock stick will do a bit of touch up but only a few times. My vote is for natural water stones and learn to keep the angle constant. sharpening is an art, you can learn it in 5 minutes.
 

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Ive used Lanskys since they first showed up and they work great and are well worth the money. Once you get the initial edge set, touchup is quick and easy, and will shave the hair off your arm every time.

I more recently picked up one of the Work Sharp machines. They work, but I dont find they put as fine an edge on the blade as the Lanskys do. I also find I have to sharpen the knife more too.

The Lansky puts more of a chisel type edge on the blade, where the WS a concave edge.

The WS guides arent as positive/repetitive as the Lanskys, and there seems to be more error there due to it. I think thats why you dont always get that shaving edge with it. They get the knife sharp, but no always shaving sharp.
 

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I use the Chefs Choice manual sharpener for my kitchen knives. They're made in USA, don't require electricity and work well.

I have a variety of others for hunting, fishing, survival knives. Not naming brands, or what's best.

I believe it's in the technique and learning how to properly sharpen something. I can make a 5$ knife shaving sharp on a car window.
 

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There is a guy on YouTube Pete with a channel called (Cedric and Ada) who has a Tormec, a Lansky and a KME and he uses the KME for almost everything. He sharpens and tests knives. The KME is not the best kit out there but they have a wide variety of stones and abrasives. The KME is a decent starter kit and will cost a couple of hundred with 5 stones.

If you are looking for one of the best guided systems they are called Wicked Edge, but they start at around $300+ and go to around $1100.
 

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I have a couple of these, Smith Sharp diamond laps.
It's a decent diamond lap for general sharpening. It'll give you a serviceable edge but is not going to put a razor edge on a blade. For that you'll need a hard Arkansas stone and strop.

Even with all the modern knife sharpening widgets and gadget available it still pays to learn how to sharpen a knife, the old fashioned way.

When sharpening a knife on a stone, I prefer a non toxic oil (like mineral oil) to a petroleum based oil. Especially if I'm going to using the knife for processing food.

With a diamond lap, I use them dry or with a little water.
 
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