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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering the purchase of a knife that would be good for survival, bush-craft, and defense against animals and humans. My budget is a bit tight. I noticed three knives that got my interest. The first below is the Glock, which has a 6.5" blade. The second one is the Ontario SP-1 with a 7" blade. The last 2 are also Ontarios with about a 5" blade. Which am I best off with?

Also, generally speaking, how many inch blade is best for survival/bushcraft, and how many inch blade is best for defense against animals like bear, cougars, and humans?

https://www.amazon.com/Glock-KB1728...000W32PIK/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...75NNTTH3/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_sims?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...JJ12WQEC409&psc=1&refRID=7H36FA5ZBJJ12WQEC409

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Forc...4PV8413RK9P&psc=1&refRID=FD8ZJZCBJ4PV8413RK9P
 

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I have the SP 1 it's a decent knife .I reprofieled the blade gave it a 35° angle so I could get it sharp enough to shave arm hair the idea behind that was that if I had to I could skin a critter make feather sticks etc.i also sharpend the false edge so if I needed use it for self defence It would make it easier for deeper penatration .I think it's a solid knife I don't know for sure but I've heard it has a thicker tang the a KA-Bar marine knife .from the reviews I have read and seen on YouTube the Glock knife is a good knife it's rugged and decent quality knife for the price .I have thought about buying the Glock 81just there is nowhere in my area that I can get a look at one to really check it out .

Sent from my A503DL using Tapatalk
 

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Comic, not your lawyer!
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You aren't going to be killing a bear. And all these knives will be rough equivalents for human or other animal defense.

From your list, probably the Glock or the Ontario SP1 with 6 inch blade. I don't know the steel it uses however. Probably a good knife. I have a similar Ontario from about 20 years ago, a Kbar clone. Good knife. Not a main knife but a good knife.

I'm going to make an alternate suggestion. Schrade 5" blade from 1095 steel. Good ergos and good sheath. $27. So right at your price range. I think this is as good or better than all your picks. Thicker blade. Features a lanyard hole, which is important for not losing it while doing bushcraft stuff or crossing water. You can remove the handles to make a spear if necessary (for fishing, or emergency hunting tool). And it comes with a sharpening stone, and pouch, and ferro rod for fire starting. Pommel can be used to strike and break glass.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PGZ0130/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_9?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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I own a lot of Schrade knives.
they are thicker blades, which I now view as a big negative. They are way thicker than necessary. So if you plan on carrying the knife much, you will be carrying almost double the weight.

If defense is one of the roles, I would prefer the false edge shape of the SP1. It also has less belly than the Schrade SCFH36. Again, it depends on what you want to use the knife for.

For woodcrafting I would prefer the shape of the Schrade.
For an all purpose knife, I would pick the Ontario SP1

The SP1 is 1075 steel, which the comments say is tougher to handle more abuse without chipping.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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For a good Schrade comparison option, I would suggest this beast.
SCFH3N



https://www.amazon.com/Schrade-SCHF...knife&qid=1581846110&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-11

The only knife I liked enough to buy a 2nd time. and a 3rd time. One of them is the serrated version, which I didn't care for so much. Ended up grinding that part down a good bit which actually turned out pretty good, but not something you should need to do. (Their serrations were rather strange compared to others).

A person or 2 in the comments managed to break theirs, but they figured it was just a bad heat treatment and Schrade sent them a replacement. But Chinese quality in action I guess.

The micarta handles are cool, but it will be harder on your hands than kraton.

Ontario is made in the US I believe. So I would trust it more, even with a thinner blade.
 

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I'm considering the purchase of a knife that would be good for survival, bush-craft, and defense against animals and humans. My budget is a bit tight. I noticed three knives that got my interest. The first below is the Glock, which has a 6.5" blade. The second one is the Ontario SP-1 with a 7" blade. The last 2 are also Ontarios with about a 5" blade. Which am I best off with?

Also, generally speaking, how many inch blade is best for survival/bushcraft, and how many inch blade is best for defense against animals like bear, cougars, and humans?

https://www.amazon.com/Glock-KB1728...000W32PIK/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...75NNTTH3/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_sims?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...JJ12WQEC409&psc=1&refRID=7H36FA5ZBJJ12WQEC409

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Forc...4PV8413RK9P&psc=1&refRID=FD8ZJZCBJ4PV8413RK9P
I’ve had several great survival outings with my Becker BK-2 for bushcrafting, or what I define as bushcraft.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You aren't going to be killing a bear. And all these knives will be rough equivalents for human or other animal defense...
I read about a guy who killed a 500 lb bear that attacked him. He only used a knife. He was very busted up by the encounter, however.

I love bears and would never want to be in a situation like above.
 

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Fenced In
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See if you can track down an Ontario SP-25. It is a discontinued model that combines the steel pommel (butt cap?) of the 499 with the handle material of the SP-2, while sharing the blade style of the two. I own all three, as well as an SP-1, and the SP-25 is my favorite.
 

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I love this *****
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I'm considering the purchase of a knife that would be good for survival, bush-craft, and defense against animals and humans. My budget is a bit tight. I noticed three knives that got my interest. The first below is the Glock, which has a 6.5" blade. The second one is the Ontario SP-1 with a 7" blade. The last 2 are also Ontarios with about a 5" blade. Which am I best off with?

Also, generally speaking, how many inch blade is best for survival/bushcraft, and how many inch blade is best for defense against animals like bear, cougars, and humans?

https://www.amazon.com/Glock-KB1728...000W32PIK/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...75NNTTH3/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_sims?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Knif...JJ12WQEC409&psc=1&refRID=7H36FA5ZBJJ12WQEC409

https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Forc...4PV8413RK9P&psc=1&refRID=FD8ZJZCBJ4PV8413RK9P

It's hard to beat the Bark River Bravo 1. It's my number one bush-craft knife. Perfect length; full tang; hefty spine; high quality carbon steel; convex grind.


 

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Aside the SP-1, the others were strictly for laughs right?

For a really tight budget, and retaining a fighting option, only the Schf45 fits the bill afaik...:



Most cheap fighting fixed blades are so incredibly dull (like all those you listed), so that getting them sharp through REK would make them unrecognizable...

But if you must go smaller, then let me suggest a SOG Super Bowie, which is still reasonable for what it is.

Bark Rivers are thin edged, so for a fighting option they also do work.

Just for their hollow grind, my suggestions beat most of what is out there, including Ontario's SP stuff, which isn't even stainless, so those will look like crap immediately after use, while the Schrade and SOG will look pratically heirloom level, even after years of hard work...

Gaston
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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For a tight budget and retaining a fighting option, only the Schf45 fits the bill afaik...:
https:



Just for the hollow grind it beats a lot that is out there, including Ontario's SP stuff, which isn't even stainless, so those will look like crap after use, while the Schrade is pratically heirloom level even after use...

Gaston
Never saw that one before. Nice!

 

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Comic, not your lawyer!
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Aside the SP-1, the others were strictly for laughs right?

For a really tight budget, and retaining a fighting option, only the Schf45 fits the bill afaik...:




Just for their hollow grind, my suggestions beat most of what is out there, including Ontario's SP stuff, which isn't even stainless, so those will look like crap immediately after use, while the Schrade and SOG will look pratically heirloom level, even after years of hard work...

Gaston
I literally just purchased, and highly recommend, that SCHF45. I bought 4 of them! Excellent feel, and the confidence with this as a backup weapon in the bush is quite high. It's nearly a short sword, with excellent design and balance. For under $40...
 

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I have a couple of the Glock knives (1 with saw back and 1 without), the 499 and the SP2. The Sp2 and the 499 are excellent knives with the sp2 having a more comfortable handle but the 499 having the benefit of the ability to hammer with the pommel. The Glock is well balanced for throwing. excellent steel and sheath. Almost indestructible. I would choose the Sp2 for a bushcraft knife and the Glock for an all around survival knife. The Glock would need the spine or a portion thereof filed flat to use a ferro rod. That all being said the 499 is the one I have in a sealed hardcase with 100 rounds of ammo and a handgun, ferro rod and a lighter as an oh **** throw it in back of truck and go right now. I have no experience with the SP1.
 

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See if you can save an extra $40 and get the Ontario Spec Plus Gen II SP-53 bolo. I am a fan of drop points for field use, as Bowie tips are more fragile.

The SP-53 is made of 5160 steel. If you are unaware, that is the same steel the leaf springs under your car are made of. All of the Spec Plus series are full tang, and made from 1/4" steel. If you can break a full-tang knife made of 1/4" leaf-spring steel, I would LOVE to know how you managed that.

The only downside to the Spec Plus series is that the sheaths could be better.

Edited to add: Ontario-knife-store.com (my go-to for all things Ontario) has them for $59.95 and $5 shipping.
 

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The last 5 years I was in the Army I used an Ontario Marine bowie.
Gave it to my kid sis, she still uses it for search and rescue.
I will never say a bad thing about any of their stuff.

Looking at your selections. The saw blades on top are not good for self defense. Once in, it will not come back out without taking a lot of stuff with it.

May I suggest you look at the SP-8. I use it for what you want too, and carry a Mora around my neck for fine work.

I modded mine up. The back edge has ripples on it. They are slight enough not to grab on the way out. But this is a wicked slicer, not a jabber.
The front chisel edge is a bark stripper and door opened.
Its also kind of Rambo-isk if you like that sort of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The price of the SP1 went up. I think it is $10 more on Amazon. On another site I saw it for even more.
 

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Regards length, if it helps, coming from a background of sticking hogs in my country, and its a major sport here(using dogs to bail or hold the pigs of course), the game experts recommend you dont go shorter than 7" blade. 6" can work but on bigger hogs you will start to have failures to take out vitals from tough angles. 8" is better, 9" works but any bigger and things get more cumbersome.

You see similar breakup for the worlds modern bayonets. In the day they were much longer of course, partly a holdover from the musket era, and also with bolt actions and single shots, foot charges were still working so really long guns and bayonets were the order of the day.

I cant speak about cougars etc but I think these lengths are a good idea to stick with( excusing the pun) if knifing things is part of the plan. In Australia most dedicated pig knifers will use what we call dedicated 'stickers' basically a long simple dagger of the lengths above. Any other tasks fall to other knives. That said the kaybar drop points and slimmer light bowies can work as well. I would not try it with any real heavy 9-10" bowie stuff, its just to hard to get them in, keeping in mind the blade can hang up on bones, sinew or ribs.

Also I see serrations as a gimmick personally, they dont cut well, they dont let air in and out like some manufacturers claim.

As to skinning, general survival, etc and combining tasks are all personal choices. Generally I find a drop point like a kabar or my knife the becker camp magnum you can do some skinning, sticking, basic butchery, opening cans and levering out tent pegs which is mostly all I use my knife for anyway
 
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